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Press Headlines
The "press headlines" is a daily compilation providing a general overview of international media coverage of climate change-related issues, that does not purport to be exhaustive. The information contained in the compilation is taken as is from sources external to the UNFCCC secretariat, that are freely available on the Internet. No evaluation on the part of the UNFCCC secretariat has been done in terms of the information that they contain. The UNFCCC secretariat makes no warranty, either express or implied, as to the accuracy, reliability or content of such information.
updated: 27 January 2015 10:18More headlines >>
India must pursue economic growth in a clean way: Christiana Figueres, UN climate change head
Christiana Figueres, executive secretary of the United Nations Framework on Climate Change, says developing countries have to break the myth that economic growth is not possible without fossil fuels and that there will more action on the renewable energy front through the year. ET caught up with the UN climate change boss ahead of 2015's first round of negotiations for the global agreement to be finalised in Paris.
The Economic Times (India)
 
New York governor says massive storms are 'part of the changing climate'
Massive snowstorms such as the one sweeping into the US north-east on Monday are “part of the changing climate”, New York’s governor, Andrew Cuomo, declared at a press conference announcing a state of emergency.
Cuomo said on Monday that “there is a pattern of extreme weather that we’ve never seen before” – reiterating his comments in the wake of hurricane Sandy, when he said that “anyone who says there’s not a dramatic change in weather patterns is probably denying reality.”
Guardian
 
Study: Global warming 'doubles risk' of extreme weather
Extreme weather arising from a climate phenomenon in the Pacific Ocean will get much worse as the world warms, according to climate modelling. Parts of the world will have weather patterns that switch between extremes of wet and dry, say scientists. The US will see more droughts while flooding will become more common in the western Pacific, research suggests.
BBC
 
Climate change could impact the poor much more than previously thought
It’s widely accepted that climate change will have bigger negative impacts on poorer countries than wealthy ones. However, a new economic modeling study finds that the economic impacts on these poorer countries could be much larger than previous estimates.
Guardian
 
Australia temperatures rising faster than rest of the world: official report
(Reuters) - Australia faced a rise in temperature of potentially more than 5 degrees celsius (41 degrees fahrenheit) by the end of the century, an increase that would outpace global warming worldwide, the country's national science agency said on Tuesday.
Reuters
 
The Climate Science Behind New England’s Historic Blizzard
Another epic blizzard is bearing down on New England. There is a “big part” played by “human-induced climate change,” especially warming-fueled ocean temperatures, according to Dr. Kevin Trenberth, former head of the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.
ThinkProgress
 
On climate change, 'not a scientist' not enough for some U.S. Republicans
(Reuters) - Rick Perry's farewell speech to the Texas legislature listed the accomplishments expected from an outgoing Republican governor of the country's largest oil-producing state. But his Jan. 15 speech also did something less predictable: touting his environmental record, from lowering Texas' carbon emissions to turning the state into a global leader in wind energy production.
Reuters
 
 
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