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Mandate Search for Observer Engagement

                         MAS Observers

Over the past decades, Parties to the UNFCCC have continuously enhanced engagement of observer organizations in the UN climate change intergovernmental process. Information on past decisions and conclusions pertaining to observer engagement is available in this online search tool. It allows easy access to relevant official documents searchable by body and/or theme.


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FCCC/SBI/2016/2 Technical/virtual participation 45. Table 2 45. Table 2
FCCC/SBI/2016/2 Interventions 45. Table 2 45. Table 2
FCCC/SBI/2016/2 Admission/observer status 44. The number of applications for admission to the UNFCCC process is therefore expected to remain high. In order to be able to continue ensuring the effective participation of more than 2,000 admitted organizations, the secretariat will take necessary administrative measures. They include requesting regular updates from these organizations of the contact details and registration certificates that indicate their interest and eligibility to remain admitted. To improve efficiency, the secretariat may remove contacts from the database whose information is no longer valid. 44. The number of applications for admission to the UNFCCC process is therefore expected to remain high. In order to be able to continue ensuring the effective participation of more than 2,000 admitted organizations, the secretariat will take necessary administrative measures. They include requesting regular updates from these organizations of the contact details and registration certificates that indicate their interest and eligibility to remain admitted. To improve efficiency, the secretariat may remove contacts from the database whose information is no longer valid.
FCCC/SBI/2016/2 Registration 45. Table 2 45. Table 2
FCCC/SBI/2016/2 Submissions and inputs 40. The SBI has also taken various steps to enhance observer engagement in the intergovernmental process. As evidenced in table 2, qualitative input in to the process by observer organizations through submissions, technical and background papers, workshop presentations, etc., has increased so much that it is almost impossible to quantify all of it.
45. Table 2
40. The SBI has also taken various steps to enhance observer engagement in the intergovernmental process. As evidenced in table 2, qualitative input in to the process by observer organizations through submissions, technical and background papers, workshop presentations, etc., has increased so much that it is almost impossible to quantify all of it.
45. Table 2
FCCC/SBI/2016/2 Workshops participation 40. The SBI has also taken various steps to enhance observer engagement in the intergovernmental process. As evidenced in table 2, qualitative input in to the process by observer organizations through submissions, technical and background papers, workshop presentations, etc., has increased so much that it is almost impossible to quantify all of it.
45. Table 2
40. The SBI has also taken various steps to enhance observer engagement in the intergovernmental process. As evidenced in table 2, qualitative input in to the process by observer organizations through submissions, technical and background papers, workshop presentations, etc., has increased so much that it is almost impossible to quantify all of it.
45. Table 2
FCCC/SBI/2016/2 Values of participation 40. In this context, the SBI has repeatedly reaffirmed the fundamental value of effective participation by observers and the value of contributions from observer organizations to deliberations on substantive issues 40. In this context, the SBI has repeatedly reaffirmed the fundamental value of effective participation by observers and the value of contributions from observer organizations to deliberations on substantive issues
FCCC/SBI/2016/2 Size of the venue 45. Table 2 45. Table 2
FCCC/SBI/2014/6 Technical/virtual participation 32. One of the areas that can be drastically improved is the use of technology for virtual participation. 32. One of the areas that can be drastically improved is the use of technology for virtual participation.
FCCC/SBI/2014/6 Briefings by presiding officers and ES 30. These improvements include the availability of draft negotiation texts to observers, improved access to observer submissions on the UNFCCC website, observer participation in intersessional limited-access meetings, opportunities to make presentations at workshops, use of observer inputs for the preparation of background documentation and publications, host country engagement of stakeholders in the lead-up to the sessions of the COP/CMP and open dialogues or briefings with presiding officers, such as the series of ADP Co-Chairs’ special events with observers. 30. These improvements include the availability of draft negotiation texts to observers, improved access to observer submissions on the UNFCCC website, observer participation in intersessional limited-access meetings, opportunities to make presentations at workshops, use of observer inputs for the preparation of background documentation and publications, host country engagement of stakeholders in the lead-up to the sessions of the COP/CMP and open dialogues or briefings with presiding officers, such as the series of ADP Co-Chairs’ special events with observers.
FCCC/SBI/2014/6 Interventions 31. In addition, it is noteworthy that there has been an increase in stakeholder events within conference venues focusing on specific themes, such as business, parliamentarians, the new market mechanism, women, cities, youth and civil society in general. Some were organized by observer organizations and others were held jointly with the COP/CMP Presidency and/or the secretariat and included high-level speakers. 31. In addition, it is noteworthy that there has been an increase in stakeholder events within conference venues focusing on specific themes, such as business, parliamentarians, the new market mechanism, women, cities, youth and civil society in general. Some were organized by observer organizations and others were held jointly with the COP/CMP Presidency and/or the secretariat and included high-level speakers.
FCCC/SBI/2014/6 Submissions and inputs 30. These improvements include the availability of draft negotiation texts to observers, improved access to observer submissions on the UNFCCC website, observer participation in intersessional limited-access meetings, opportunities to make presentations at workshops, use of observer inputs for the preparation of background documentation and publications, host country engagement of stakeholders in the lead-up to the sessions of the COP/CMP and open dialogues or briefings with presiding officers, such as the series of ADP Co-Chairs’ special events with observers. 30. These improvements include the availability of draft negotiation texts to observers, improved access to observer submissions on the UNFCCC website, observer participation in intersessional limited-access meetings, opportunities to make presentations at workshops, use of observer inputs for the preparation of background documentation and publications, host country engagement of stakeholders in the lead-up to the sessions of the COP/CMP and open dialogues or briefings with presiding officers, such as the series of ADP Co-Chairs’ special events with observers.
FCCC/SBI/2014/6 Workshop presentation 30. These improvements include the availability of draft negotiation texts to observers, improved access to observer submissions on the UNFCCC website, observer participation in intersessional limited-access meetings, opportunities to make presentations at workshops, use of observer inputs for the preparation of background documentation and publications, host country engagement of stakeholders in the lead-up to the sessions of the COP/CMP and open dialogues or briefings with presiding officers, such as the series of ADP Co-Chairs’ special events with observers. 30. These improvements include the availability of draft negotiation texts to observers, improved access to observer submissions on the UNFCCC website, observer participation in intersessional limited-access meetings, opportunities to make presentations at workshops, use of observer inputs for the preparation of background documentation and publications, host country engagement of stakeholders in the lead-up to the sessions of the COP/CMP and open dialogues or briefings with presiding officers, such as the series of ADP Co-Chairs’ special events with observers.
FCCC/SBI/2014/6 Workshops participation 30. These improvements include the availability of draft negotiation texts to observers, improved access to observer submissions on the UNFCCC website, observer participation in intersessional limited-access meetings, opportunities to make presentations at workshops, use of observer inputs for the preparation of background documentation and publications, host country engagement of stakeholders in the lead-up to the sessions of the COP/CMP and open dialogues or briefings with presiding officers, such as the series of ADP Co-Chairs’ special events with observers. 30. These improvements include the availability of draft negotiation texts to observers, improved access to observer submissions on the UNFCCC website, observer participation in intersessional limited-access meetings, opportunities to make presentations at workshops, use of observer inputs for the preparation of background documentation and publications, host country engagement of stakeholders in the lead-up to the sessions of the COP/CMP and open dialogues or briefings with presiding officers, such as the series of ADP Co-Chairs’ special events with observers.
FCCC/SBI/2013/4 Financial support 35.The table below provides an update on the implementation of the SBI conclusions where the secretariat is in a position to report. Theresults highlight the concerted efforts of the presiding officers, host countries and secretariat, despite resource constraints. The SBI may wish to provide guidance on the way forward for observer engagement in the UNFCCC process. 35.The table below provides an update on the implementation of the SBI conclusions where the secretariat is in a position to report. Theresults highlight the concerted efforts of the presiding officers, host countries and secretariat, despite resource constraints. The SBI may wish to provide guidance on the way forward for observer engagement in the UNFCCC process.
FCCC/SBI/2013/4 Briefings by presiding officers and ES 35.The table below provides an update on the implementation of the SBI conclusions where the secretariat is in a position to report. Theresults highlight the concerted efforts of the presiding officers, host countries and secretariat, despite resource constraints. The SBI may wish to provide guidance on the way forward for observer engagement in the UNFCCC processn 35.The table below provides an update on the implementation of the SBI conclusions where the secretariat is in a position to report. Theresults highlight the concerted efforts of the presiding officers, host countries and secretariat, despite resource constraints. The SBI may wish to provide guidance on the way forward for observer engagement in the UNFCCC processn
FCCC/SBI/2013/4 Interventions 32. Observer organizations continue to take advantage of opportunities to address the joint high-level segment of the COP and the CMP. Twenty-four observer organizations spoke on behalf of various intergovernmental organizations and non-governmental organization (NGO)constituencies at COP 18and CMP 8. In that context, the President of COP 18 and CMP 8 has encouraged all Parties to send at least one representative from their delegation to the plenary hall in order to listen to observer statements. 32. Observer organizations continue to take advantage of opportunities to address the joint high-level segment of the COP and the CMP. Twenty-four observer organizations spoke on behalf of various intergovernmental organizations and non-governmental organization (NGO)constituencies at COP 18and CMP 8. In that context, the President of COP 18 and CMP 8 has encouraged all Parties to send at least one representative from their delegation to the plenary hall in order to listen to observer statements.
FCCC/SBI/2013/4 Admission/observer status
29. At COP 18 and CMP 8, the number of observer organizations admitted to the UNFCCC process reached a total of 1,719 organizations, which represents a 65 per cent increase from the 2008 level. In 2012, the secretariat extended the provisional status of the farmers constituency, on the basis of consultation with the constituency. 29. At COP 18 and CMP 8, the number of observer organizations admitted to the UNFCCC process reached a total of 1,719 organizations, which represents a 65 per cent increase from the 2008 level. In 2012, the secretariat extended the provisional status of the farmers constituency, on the basis of consultation with the constituency.
FCCC/SBI/2013/4 Contact groups 35.The table below provides an update on the implementation of the SBI conclusions where the secretariat is in a position to report. Theresults highlight the concerted efforts of the presiding officers, host countries and secretariat, despite resource constraints. The SBI may wish to provide guidance on the way forward for observer engagement in the UNFCCC processn 35.The table below provides an update on the implementation of the SBI conclusions where the secretariat is in a position to report. Theresults highlight the concerted efforts of the presiding officers, host countries and secretariat, despite resource constraints. The SBI may wish to provide guidance on the way forward for observer engagement in the UNFCCC processn
FCCC/SBI/2013/4 Presidency's engagement 35.The table below provides an update on the implementation of the SBI conclusions where the secretariat is in a position to report. Theresults highlight the concerted efforts of the presiding officers, host countries and secretariat, despite resource constraints. The SBI may wish to provide guidance on the way forward for observer engagement in the UNFCCC processn 35.The table below provides an update on the implementation of the SBI conclusions where the secretariat is in a position to report. Theresults highlight the concerted efforts of the presiding officers, host countries and secretariat, despite resource constraints. The SBI may wish to provide guidance on the way forward for observer engagement in the UNFCCC processn
FCCC/SBI/2013/4 Registration 35.The table below provides an update on the implementation of the SBI conclusions where the secretariat is in a position to report. Theresults highlight the concerted efforts of the presiding officers, host countries and secretariat, despite resource constraints. The SBI may wish to provide guidance on the way forward for observer engagement in the UNFCCC processn 35.The table below provides an update on the implementation of the SBI conclusions where the secretariat is in a position to report. Theresults highlight the concerted efforts of the presiding officers, host countries and secretariat, despite resource constraints. The SBI may wish to provide guidance on the way forward for observer engagement in the UNFCCC processn
FCCC/SBI/2013/4 Constituencies 29. At COP 18 and CMP 8, the number of observer organizations admitted to the UNFCCC process reached a total of 1,719 organizations, which represents a 65 per cent increase from the 2008 level. In 2012, the secretariat extended the provisional status of the farmers constituency, on the basis of consultation with the constituency. 29. At COP 18 and CMP 8, the number of observer organizations admitted to the UNFCCC process reached a total of 1,719 organizations, which represents a 65 per cent increase from the 2008 level. In 2012, the secretariat extended the provisional status of the farmers constituency, on the basis of consultation with the constituency.
FCCC/SBI/2013/4 Side Events and Exhibits 30. During sessions, side events and exhibits are the main modes of observer engagement in the UNFCCC process. 30. During sessions, side events and exhibits are the main modes of observer engagement in the UNFCCC process.
FCCC/SBI/2012/11 Publicity stunts 35. Media actions and demonstrations provide observers with another avenue in which to express their views. Although not permitted in other United Nations premises, certain activities are facilitated during UNFCCC sessions in close cooperation with United Nations Security, with a view to achieving a higher level of engagement of advocacy NGOs. At COP 16/CMP 16 and COP 17/CMP 7, an average of about 55 media events and actions took place. 35. Media actions and demonstrations provide observers with another avenue in which to express their views. Although not permitted in other United Nations premises, certain activities are facilitated during UNFCCC sessions in close cooperation with United Nations Security, with a view to achieving a higher level of engagement of advocacy NGOs. At COP 16/CMP 16 and COP 17/CMP 7, an average of about 55 media events and actions took place.
FCCC/SBI/2012/11 Access and Transparency 37. To promote greater transparency, the SBI, at its thirty-fourth session, recommended that, in the event that there is no contact group for an agenda item, at least the first and last meetings of informal consultations may be opened to observer organizations, recognizing the right of Parties to keep informal meetings closed. Implementation of this practice since the Panama Climate Change Conference in 2011 has been widely welcomed by observers. 37. To promote greater transparency, the SBI, at its thirty-fourth session, recommended that, in the event that there is no contact group for an agenda item, at least the first and last meetings of informal consultations may be opened to observer organizations, recognizing the right of Parties to keep informal meetings closed. Implementation of this practice since the Panama Climate Change Conference in 2011 has been widely welcomed by observers.
FCCC/SBI/2012/11 Technical/virtual participation 34. In keeping with the SBI conclusions calling for the enhancement of technical means of participation, a number of... 34. In keeping with the SBI conclusions calling for the enhancement of technical means of participation, a number of...
FCCC/SBI/2012/11 Interventions 38. Observer organizations continue to make use of other means of participation during sessions, such as interventions in formal meetings and meetings with the COP/CMP President, the Chairs of the Convention bodies and the Executive Secretary in order to directly feed their inputs into the process. 38. Observer organizations continue to make use of other means of participation during sessions, such as interventions in formal meetings and meetings with the COP/CMP President, the Chairs of the Convention bodies and the Executive Secretary in order to directly feed their inputs into the process.
FCCC/SBI/2012/11 Admission/observer status
32. The total number of organizations with observer status currently amounts to 1,635, a 57 per cent increase from the 2008 level. 32. The total number of organizations with observer status currently amounts to 1,635, a 57 per cent increase from the 2008 level.
FCCC/SBI/2012/11 Contact groups 37. To promote greater transparency, the SBI, at its thirty-fourth session, recommended that, in the event that there is no contact group for an agenda item, at least the first and last meetings of informal consultations may be opened to observer organizations, recognizing the right of Parties to keep informal meetings closed. Implementation of this practice since the Panama Climate Change Conference in 2011 has been widely welcomed by observers. 37. To promote greater transparency, the SBI, at its thirty-fourth session, recommended that, in the event that there is no contact group for an agenda item, at least the first and last meetings of informal consultations may be opened to observer organizations, recognizing the right of Parties to keep informal meetings closed. Implementation of this practice since the Panama Climate Change Conference in 2011 has been widely welcomed by observers.
FCCC/SBI/2012/11 Registration 33. With the successful introduction of the online registration system to facilitate the participation at UNFCCC sessions, the registration of observers is regulated in accordance with the total capacity of the premises and the safety and security of all participants. It is noteworthy that the requests for registration for attendance remained high, at approximately 12,000 for both COP 16/CMP 6 and COP 17/CMP 7, while the actual number of registrations was set at approximately 7,000. 33. With the successful introduction of the online registration system to facilitate the participation at UNFCCC sessions, the registration of observers is regulated in accordance with the total capacity of the premises and the safety and security of all participants. It is noteworthy that the requests for registration for attendance remained high, at approximately 12,000 for both COP 16/CMP 6 and COP 17/CMP 7, while the actual number of registrations was set at approximately 7,000.
FCCC/SBI/2012/11 Submissions and inputs 39. ... At the same session, the SBI agreed to examine, at its thirty-sixth session, options for new channels for observer organizations to provide formal inputs into the high-level segment of the sessions of the COP and the CMP.,
41. During the special event, participants highlighted the guiding principles for any new channels to enhance observer inputs, including: keeping inclusivity and openness as an
overarching goal; recognizing that constituencies need different approaches to maximize their inputs; coordinating any new formal inputs with existing means for informal inputs;
and allowing sufficient space for observer inputs to reach a level of sophistication appropriate for ministers, rather than limiting their inputs to brief plenary statements.
39. ... At the same session, the SBI agreed to examine, at its thirty-sixth session, options for new channels for observer organizations to provide formal inputs into the high-level segment of the sessions of the COP and the CMP.,
41. During the special event, participants highlighted the guiding principles for any new channels to enhance observer inputs, including: keeping inclusivity and openness as an
overarching goal; recognizing that constituencies need different approaches to maximize their inputs; coordinating any new formal inputs with existing means for informal inputs;
and allowing sufficient space for observer inputs to reach a level of sophistication appropriate for ministers, rather than limiting their inputs to brief plenary statements.
FCCC/SBI/2012/11 Workshops
participation
36. Observer organizations show continued interest in intersessional workshop participation having made, separately and jointly, 170 substantive submissions in 2011. 36. Observer organizations show continued interest in intersessional workshop participation having made, separately and jointly, 170 substantive submissions in 2011.
FCCC/SBI/2012/11 Constituencies 32. In 2011, the secretariat granted formal status to two additional constituencies: women and gender, and youth. With the constituency of farmers still in a
provisional status, the nine UNFCCC constituencies correspond to the nine major groups recognized by Agenda 21.
32. In 2011, the secretariat granted formal status to two additional constituencies: women and gender, and youth. With the constituency of farmers still in a
provisional status, the nine UNFCCC constituencies correspond to the nine major groups recognized by Agenda 21.
FCCC/SBI/2012/11 Good practices 43. It was also noted that the upcoming United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20 Conference) would also hold round table discussions with observers, which could provide additional examples of good practice. 43. It was also noted that the upcoming United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20 Conference) would also hold round table discussions with observers, which could provide additional examples of good practice.
FCCC/SBI/2012/11 Side Events and Exhibits 34. ...Other innovations at COP 17/CMP 7 address the high demand for a limited number of side event and exhibit slots, such as… 34. ...Other innovations at COP 17/CMP 7 address the high demand for a limited number of side event and exhibit slots, such as…
FCCC/SBI/2012/15 Access and Transparency 234. ...The SBI also stressed the importance of the principles of transparency and inclusiveness in the lead-up to and during COP 18 and CMP 8.
242. The SBI recalled the conclusions from its thirty-fourth session agreeing that the existing means of engagement of observer organizations could be further enhanced, in the spirit of fostering openness, transparency and inclusiveness, through various ways as set out in the conclusions,and requested the presiding officers, the hosts of future sessions of the COP and the CMP, all Parties and the secretariat to bear in mind these conclusions in engaging stakeholders.
234. ...The SBI also stressed the importance of the principles of transparency and inclusiveness in the lead-up to and during COP 18 and CMP 8.
242. The SBI recalled the conclusions from its thirty-fourth session agreeing that the existing means of engagement of observer organizations could be further enhanced, in the spirit of fostering openness, transparency and inclusiveness, through various ways as set out in the conclusions,and requested the presiding officers, the hosts of future sessions of the COP and the CMP, all Parties and the secretariat to bear in mind these conclusions in engaging stakeholders.
FCCC/SBI/2012/15 Briefings by presiding officers and ES 241. The SBI suggested that the hosts of future sessions of the COP and the CMP and the secretariat explore the possibility of holding high-level events, such as a briefing and a round table with observer organizations, including high-level representatives of the private sector, civil society and other stakeholders, in line with existing practices, during the high-level segment of the COP and the CMP, subject to the availability of financial resources. 241. The SBI suggested that the hosts of future sessions of the COP and the CMP and the secretariat explore the possibility of holding high-level events, such as a briefing and a round table with observer organizations, including high-level representatives of the private sector, civil society and other stakeholders, in line with existing practices, during the high-level segment of the COP and the CMP, subject to the availability of financial resources.
FCCC/SBI/2012/15 Interventions 232. The SBI recommended that arrangements be made to organize the high-level segment from 4 to 7 December such that statements are delivered by ministers, heads of delegation and representatives of intergovernmental organizations and NGOs, 233. The SBI agreed that arrangements should be made for the delivery of concise national statements by ministers and other h
eads of delegation, with a recommended time limit of three minutes, and also concise statements by representatives of intergovernmental organizations and NGOs, with a recommended time limit of two minutes, in the joint meetings of the COP and the CMP during the high-level segment.
232. The SBI recommended that arrangements be made to organize the high-level segment from 4 to 7 December such that statements are delivered by ministers, heads of delegation and representatives of intergovernmental organizations and NGOs, 233. The SBI agreed that arrangements should be made for the delivery of concise national statements by ministers and other h
eads of delegation, with a recommended time limit of three minutes, and also concise statements by representatives of intergovernmental organizations and NGOs, with a recommended time limit of two minutes, in the joint meetings of the COP and the CMP during the high-level segment.
FCCC/SBI/2012/15 Values of participation 240. The SBI recalled the conclusions from its thirty-fourth session reaffirming the fundamental value of effective participation by observers and the value of contributions from observer organizations to deliberations on substantive issues, while recognizing the recent exponential increase of participants from observer organizations 240. The SBI recalled the conclusions from its thirty-fourth session reaffirming the fundamental value of effective participation by observers and the value of contributions from observer organizations to deliberations on substantive issues, while recognizing the recent exponential increase of participants from observer organizations
FCCC/SBI/2011/6 Interventions 39. During sessions, observer organizations continue to make use of opportunities to intervene in formal meetings and to meet the COP/CMP President and the Chairs of the Convention bodies in order to directly feed inputs into the process. Dialogue between the secretariat and constituency focal points has become institutionalized. 39. During sessions, observer organizations continue to make use of opportunities to intervene in formal meetings and to meet the COP/CMP President and the Chairs of the Convention bodies in order to directly feed inputs into the process. Dialogue between the secretariat and constituency focal points has become institutionalized.
FCCC/SBI/2011/6 Admission/observer status
37. The current number of intergovernmental organizations and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) with observer status with the UNFCCC is 1,495, which is a 45 per cent increase from 2008. 37. The current number of intergovernmental organizations and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) with observer status with the UNFCCC is 1,495, which is a 45 per cent increase from 2008.
FCCC/SBI/2011/6 Registration 38. Attendance in the last five years has steadily increased from 2,933 observer participants at COP 12/CMP 2 to 13,482 at COP 15/CMP 5. In August 2010 the secretariat introduced an online registration system to facilitate and better manage the participation of observer participants at UNFCCC sessions. 38. Attendance in the last five years has steadily increased from 2,933 observer participants at COP 12/CMP 2 to 13,482 at COP 15/CMP 5. In August 2010 the secretariat introduced an online registration system to facilitate and better manage the participation of observer participants at UNFCCC sessions.
FCCC/SBI/2011/6 Submissions and inputs 33. The SBI, at its thirty-third session, considered submissions from Parties and observer organizations and information provided in a synthesis report prepared by the secretariat on ways to enhance the engagement of observer organizations., 41. 41. Between and in preparation for sessions, observer organizations show continued interest in attending workshops and making submissions. Observer organizations separately and jointly, made 109 submissions in 2009, 51 in 2010 and 90 so far in 2011, including those reflected in the synthesis report referred to in paragraph 33 above. 33. The SBI, at its thirty-third session, considered submissions from Parties and observer organizations and information provided in a synthesis report prepared by the secretariat on ways to enhance the engagement of observer organizations., 41. 41. Between and in preparation for sessions, observer organizations show continued interest in attending workshops and making submissions. Observer organizations separately and jointly, made 109 submissions in 2009, 51 in 2010 and 90 so far in 2011, including those reflected in the synthesis report referred to in paragraph 33 above.
FCCC/SBI/2011/6 Workshops participation 41. Between and in preparation for sessions, observer organizations show continued interest in attending workshops and making submissions. Observer organizations separately and jointly, made 109 submissions in 2009, 51 in 2010 and 90 so far in 2011, including those reflected in the synthesis report referred to in paragraph 33 above. 41. Between and in preparation for sessions, observer organizations show continued interest in attending workshops and making submissions. Observer organizations separately and jointly, made 109 submissions in 2009, 51 in 2010 and 90 so far in 2011, including those reflected in the synthesis report referred to in paragraph 33 above.
FCCC/SBI/2011/6 Values of participation 33. A number of submissions from Parties and observer organizations emphasized the value of participation by and dialogue with observer organizations, and called for improved measures to enhance information exchange between observer organizations and the Parties. 33. A number of submissions from Parties and observer organizations emphasized the value of participation by and dialogue with observer organizations, and called for improved measures to enhance information exchange between observer organizations and the Parties.
FCCC/SBI/2011/6 Constituencies 37. In 2009, the secretariat granted provisional status to three additional constituencies, namely, farmers, women and gender, and youth. With these three additional constituencies, the nine UNFCCC constituencies would correspond to the nine major groups recognized by Agenda 21. 37. In 2009, the secretariat granted provisional status to three additional constituencies, namely, farmers, women and gender, and youth. With these three additional constituencies, the nine UNFCCC constituencies would correspond to the nine major groups recognized by Agenda 21.
FCCC/SBI/2011/6 Good practices 34. In addition, the SBI recognized the need to take into account best practices from other processes within the United Nations system., 36. The SBI may wish to provide guidance on ways to enhance the engagement of observer organizations in the intergovernmental process, with a view to adopting conclusions or a draft decision for adoption by the COP at its seventeenth session. The SBI may also wish to consider ways to enable observer organizations to participate more formally in the process such as through advisory panels or channels similar to practices in other processes in the United Nations system. 46. A number of United Nations processes permit civil society observers to participate in meetings of their governing bodies. Examples can be found in the rules of procedure of the Aarhus Convention, the Codex Alimentarius Commission, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed Consent Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade, the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants and UNEP. 34. In addition, the SBI recognized the need to take into account best practices from other processes within the United Nations system., 36. The SBI may wish to provide guidance on ways to enhance the engagement of observer organizations in the intergovernmental process, with a view to adopting conclusions or a draft decision for adoption by the COP at its seventeenth session. The SBI may also wish to consider ways to enable observer organizations to participate more formally in the process such as through advisory panels or channels similar to practices in other processes in the United Nations system. 46. A number of United Nations processes permit civil society observers to participate in meetings of their governing bodies. Examples can be found in the rules of procedure of the AarhusConvention, the Codex Alimentarius Commission, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed Consent Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade, the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants and UNEP.
FCCC/SBI/2011/6 Aarhus Convention 46. A number of United Nations processes permit civil society observers to participate in meetings of their governing bodies. Examples can be found in the rules of procedure of the Aarhus Convention, the Codex Alimentarius Commission, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed Consent Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade, the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants and UNEP. 46. A number of United Nations processes permit civil society observers to participate in meetings of their governing bodies. Examples can be found in the rules of procedure of the Aarhus Convention, the Codex Alimentarius Commission, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed Consent Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade, the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants and UNEP.
FCCC/SBI/2011/INF.7 Access and Transparency 9. She outlined the range of means currently available for UN organizations, intergovernmental organizations and NGOs to engage in the UNFCCC process, including participation in meetings and contact groups, written submissions and side events. 9. She outlined the range of means currently available for UN organizations, intergovernmental organizations and NGOs to engage in the UNFCCC process, including participation in meetings and contact groups, written submissions and side events.
FCCC/SBI/2011/INF.7 Code of Conduct 13. The representative of business and industry NGOs (BINGOs) stressed the need to preserve and strengthen practices that have worked well and said the current guidelines for participation should be retained. 13. The representative of business and industry NGOs (BINGOs) stressed the need to preserve and strengthen practices that have worked well and said the current guidelines for participation should be retained.
FCCC/SBI/2011/INF.7 Financial support 19. The representative of the women and gender constituency called for additional financial resources for the capacity-building of civil society in order to facilitate effective public participation ..., 26. He also supported a participation fund for developing countries and leaders of social movements. 19. The representative of the women and gender constituency called for additional financial resources for the capacity-building of civil society in order to facilitate effective public participation ..., 26. He also supported a participation fund for developing countries and leaders of social movements.
FCCC/SBI/2011/INF.7 Technical/virtual participation 13. She suggested increased use of new technologies, such as newsflashes to inform constituencies, a dedicated web-page for each constituency and putting all documents online as soon as they become available. ,
25. To set the stage for the discussion, the secretariat provided an update on the current status of “virtual participation”, whereby ...
13. She suggested increased use of new technologies, such as newsflashes to inform constituencies, a dedicated web-page for each constituency and putting all documents online as soon as they become available. ,
25. To set the stage for the discussion, the secretariat provided an update on the current status of “virtual participation”, whereby ...
FCCC/SBI/2011/INF.7 Interventions 14. The representative of environmental NGOs (ENGOs) called for increased interventions during plenary meetings, contact groups and other negotiating sessions and cited practices from the Aarhus Convention as an example of good practice. 15. The representative of indigenous peoples organizations (IPOs) recalled Articles 41 and 42 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007) and called for priority interventions in areas of work with direct impacts on indigenous peoples including finance, adaptation and REDD-plu 14. The representative of environmental NGOs (ENGOs) called for increased interventions during plenary meetings, contact groups and other negotiating sessions and cited practices from the Aarhus Convention as an example of good practice. 15. The representative of indigenous peoples organizations (IPOs) recalled Articles 41 and 42 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007) and called for priority interventions in areas of work with direct impacts on indigenous peoples including finance, adaptation and REDD-plu
FCCC/SBI/2011/INF.7 Admission/observer status
9. To set the stage for the discussion, the representative of the secretariat presented an overview of observer participation in the UNFCCC process and highlighted the tremendous growth in the number of admitted organizations over the past 16 years. … 9. To set the stage for the discussion, the representative of the secretariat presented an overview of observer participation in the UNFCCC process and highlighted the tremendous growth in the number of admitted organizations over the past 16 years. …
FCCC/SBI/2011/INF.7 Contact groups 22. Some speakers emphasized the need for improved access to informal groups and reiterated that it is common practice in other processes to allow observers in first and then close the meeting if necessary. Others noted that increased access is not only about providing transparency, but also about playing a constructive role in building the capacity of some Parties. 22. Some speakers emphasized the need for improved access to informal groups and reiterated that it is common practice in other processes to allow observers in first and then close the meeting if necessary. Others noted that increased access is not only about providing transparency, but also about playing a constructive role in building the capacity of some Parties.
FCCC/SBI/2011/INF.7 Submissions and inputs 9. She outlined the range of means currently available for UN organizations, intergovernmental organizations and NGOs to engage in the UNFCCC process, including participation in meetings and contact groups, written submissions and side events. 9. She outlined the range of means currently available for UN organizations, intergovernmental organizations and NGOs to engage in the UNFCCC process, including participation in meetings and contact groups, written submissions and side events.
FCCC/SBI/2011/INF.7 Workshops participation 11 . He called for greater use of workshops and technical meetings, including observer inputs, as they provide a constructive setting for informal exchanges. He proposed a creative use of informal avenues, such as constituency interaction with delegations and major negotiating groups. 11 . He called for greater use of workshops and technical meetings, including observer inputs, as they provide a constructive setting for informal exchanges. He proposed a creative use of informal avenues, such as constituency interaction with delegations and major negotiating groups.
FCCC/SBI/2011/INF.7 Values of participation 17. ...She stressed the importance of the participation of observers with a science or social science background who can assist with the interpretation of scientific issues and help assess the likely effects of different policy choices. 17. ...She stressed the importance of the participation of observers with a science or social science background who can assist with the interpretation of scientific issues and help assess the likely effects of different policy choices.
FCCC/SBI/2011/INF.7 Good practices 9. She also highlighted good practices of other United Nations processes relating to participation and reviewed recent secretariat initiatives such as the Climate Change Studio and the Blogger’s Loft. 14. The representative of environmental NGOs (ENGOs) called for increased interventions during plenary meetings, contact groups and other negotiating sessions and cited practices from the Aarhus Convention as an example of good practice. 9. She also highlighted good practices of other United Nations processes relating to participation and reviewed recent secretariat initiatives such as the Climate Change Studio and the Blogger’s Loft. 14. The representative of environmental NGOs (ENGOs) called for increased interventions during plenary meetings, contact groups and other negotiating sessions and cited practices from the AarhusConvention as an example of good practice.
FCCC/SBI/2011/INF.7 Aarhus Convention 14. The representative of environmental NGOs (ENGOs) called for increased interventions during plenary meetings, contact groups and other negotiating sessions and cited practices from the Aarhus Convention as an example of good practice. 14. The representative of environmental NGOs (ENGOs) called for increased interventions during plenary meetings, contact groups and other negotiating sessions and cited practices from the Aarhus Convention as an example of good practice.
FCCC/SBI/2011/INF.7 Side Events and Exhibits 9. She outlined the range of means currently available for UN organizations, intergovernmental organizations and NGOs to engage in the UNFCCC process, including participation in meetings and contact groups, written submissions and side events. 9. She outlined the range of means currently available for UN organizations, intergovernmental organizations and NGOs to engage in the UNFCCC process, including participation in meetings and contact groups, written submissions and side events.
FCCC/SBI/2011/L.19 Access and Transparency 23. The SBI agreed that the existing means of engagement of observer organizations could be further enhanced, in the spirit of fostering openness, transparency and inclusiveness through: 23. The SBI agreed that the existing means of engagement of observer organizations could be further enhanced, in the spirit of fostering openness, transparency and inclusiveness through:
FCCC/SBI/2011/L.19 Technical/virtual participation 20. The SBI further welcomed the efforts made by the secretariat to use technical means of participation, including the ongoing redesign of the UNFCCC website and the examination of virtual participation for intersessional informal consultations, in-session side events and press conferences. The SBI requested the secretariat to continue the development of technical means of participation, subject to the availability of resources. , 23 (e, ii) Increase the number of meetings that are webcast. 20. The SBI further welcomed the efforts made by the secretariat to use technical means of participation, including the ongoing redesign of the UNFCCC website and the examination of virtual participation for intersessional informal consultations, in-session side events and press conferences. The SBI requested the secretariat to continue the development of technical means of participation, subject to the availability of resources. , 23 (e, ii) Increase the number of meetings that are webcast.
FCCC/SBI/2011/L.19 Briefings by presiding officers and ES 23 (a, iii) Increase opportunities for regular briefings and debriefings as a means for dialogue for observer organizations with presiding officers and Parties. 23 (a, iii) Increase opportunities for regular briefings and debriefings as a means for dialogue for observer organizations with presiding officers and Parties.
FCCC/SBI/2011/L.19 Interventions 23 (a, i) Seek opportunities for observer organizations to make interventions; 23 (a, i) Seek opportunities for observer organizations to make interventions;
FCCC/SBI/2011/L.19 National level engagement 18. The SBI welcomed the efforts made by the Government of Mexico, before and during its Presidency of the COP and the CMP, in engaging stakeholders, including the local civil society, in the lead up to and during COP 16 and CMP 6, as well as its continued commitment to observer engagement in 2011. 19. The SBI also welcomed the commitments of the Government of South Africa to maintain open engagement with civil society in the lead up to and during COP 17 and CMP 7. 18. The SBI welcomed the efforts made by the Government of Mexico, before and during its Presidency of the COP and the CMP, in engaging stakeholders, including the local civil society, in the lead up to and during COP 16 and CMP 6, as well as its continued commitment to observer engagement in 2011. 19. The SBI also welcomed the commitments of the Government of South Africa to maintain open engagement with civil society in the lead up to and during COP 17 and CMP 7.
FCCC/SBI/2011/L.19 Presidency's engagement 17. The SBI welcomed the current efforts by the Chairs of the subsidiary bodies and the President of the COP and the CMP to hold in-session briefings and dialogue sessions. It invited the Chairs of the subsidiary bodies and the President of the COP and the CMP to increase these efforts, and encouraged observer organizations to take advantage of these opportunities as a platform for direct dialogue with the President of the COP and the CMP and the Chairs of the subsidiary bodies. 17. The SBI welcomed the current efforts by the Chairs of the subsidiary bodies and the President of the COP and the CMP to hold in-session briefings and dialogue sessions. It invited the Chairs of the subsidiary bodies and the President of the COP and the CMP to increase these efforts, and encouraged observer organizations to take advantage of these opportunities as a platform for direct dialogue with the President of the COP and the CMP and the Chairs of the subsidiary bodies.
FCCC/SBI/2011/L.19 Registration 23 (e, i) Enable the replacement of names of nominated representatives of admitted observer organizations in the online registration system before and during sessions in exceptional circumstances; 23 (e, i) Enable the replacement of names of nominated representatives of admitted observer organizations in the online registration system before and during sessions in exceptional circumstances;
FCCC/SBI/2011/L.19 inputs for background documents 23 (d, ii) Make use of observer inputs, including scientific and technical, for the preparation of background documentation. 23 (d, ii) Make use of observer inputs, including scientific and technical, for the preparation of background documentation.
FCCC/SBI/2011/L.19 Submissions and inputs 23 (d, i) Post submissions from observer organizations on the UNFCCC website in a way that makes them accessible to Parties; 23 (d, i) Post submissions from observer organizations on the UNFCCC website in a way that makes them accessible to Parties;
FCCC/SBI/2011/L.19 Workshop presentation 21. The SBI agreed that existing means of engagement in workshops should be enhanced. Recalling its conclusions at its seventeenth session on attendance by observer organizations in intersessional workshops, the SBI encouraged the chairs of workshops and expert meetings to invite, time permitting, observer organizations to make presentations, while maintaining the balance of participation between Parties and observer organizations. In this context, the SBI welcomed the practices of the recent mitigation workshops, at which observers could make presentations when time allowed. 21. The SBI agreed that existing means of engagement in workshops should be enhanced. Recalling its conclusions at its seventeenth session on attendance by observer organizations in intersessional workshops, the SBI encouraged the chairs of workshops and expert meetings to invite, time permitting, observer organizations to make presentations, while maintaining the balance of participation between Parties and observer organizations. In this context, the SBI welcomed the practices of the recent mitigation workshops, at which observers could make presentations when time allowed.
FCCC/SBI/2011/L.19 Workshops participation 21. The SBI agreed that existing means of engagement in workshops should be enhanced. Recalling its conclusions at its seventeenth session on attendance by observer organizations in intersessional workshops, the SBI encouraged the chairs of workshops and expert meetings to invite, time permitting, observer organizations to make presentations, while maintaining the balance of participation between Parties and observer organizations. In this context, the SBI welcomed the practices of the recent mitigation workshops, at which observers could make presentations when time allowed. , 23 (a, ii) Make greater use of observer inputs in workshops and technical meetings in accordance with the conclusions of the SBI at its seventeenth session in 2002 21. The SBI agreed that existing means of engagement in workshops should be enhanced. Recalling its conclusions at its seventeenth session on attendance by observer organizations in intersessional workshops, the SBI encouraged the chairs of workshops and expert meetings to invite, time permitting, observer organizations to make presentations, while maintaining the balance of participation between Parties and observer organizations. In this context, the SBI welcomed the practices of the recent mitigation workshops, at which observers could make presentations when time allowed. , 23 (a, ii) Make greater use of observer inputs in workshops and technical meetings in accordance with the conclusions of the SBI at its seventeenth session in 2002
FCCC/SBI/2011/L.19 Values of participation 14. The SBI recalled the conclusions at its thirty-third session recognizing that the range and value of observer organization engagement is diverse, broad and rich, and that the role and contributions of observer organizations in the UNFCCC process should be enhanced.
15. The SBI recognized the need to engage a broad range of stakeholders at the global, regional, national and local levels, be they government, including subnational and local government, private business or civil society, including youth and persons with disability, and that gender equality and the effective participation of women and indigenous peoples are important for effective action on all aspects of climate change.
16. The SBI reaffirmed the fundamental value of effective participation by observers and the value of contributions from observer organizations to deliberations on substantive issues while recognizing the recent significant increase in the number of participants from observer organizations.
14. The SBI recalled the conclusions at its thirty-third session recognizing that the range and value of observer organization engagement is diverse, broad and rich, and that the role and contributions of observer organizations in the UNFCCC process should be enhanced.
15. The SBI recognized the need to engage a broad range of stakeholders at the global, regional, national and local levels, be they government, including subnational and local government, private business or civil society, including youth and persons with disability, and that gender equality and the effective participation of women and indigenous peoples are important for effective action on all aspects of climate change.
16. The SBI reaffirmed the fundamental value of effective participation by observers and the value of contributions from observer organizations to deliberations on substantive issues while recognizing the recent significant increase in the number of participants from observer organizations.
FCCC/SBI/2011/L.19 Good practices 13. The SBI took note of the information provided by the secretariat on observer organizations in the UNFCCC process and on the good practices from other processes in the United Nations system,
and of the report of the in-session workshop to further develop ways to enhance the engagement of observer organizations in the UNFCCC process
13. The SBI took note of the information provided by the secretariat on observer organizations in the UNFCCC process and on the good practices from other processes in the United Nations system,
and of the report of the in-session workshop to further develop ways to enhance the engagement of observer organizations in the UNFCCC process
FCCC/SBI/2011/L.19 Size of the venue 23 (b, i) Consider, in their planning, and organization, the size of the venue, the distance between buildings and the need to facilitate the participation of all Parties and admitted observer organizations, recalling the conclusions of the SBI at its thirty-second session 23 (b, i) Consider, in their planning, and organization, the size of the venue, the distance between buildings and the need to facilitate the participation of all Parties and admitted observer organizations, recalling the conclusions of the SBI at its thirty-second session
FCCC/SBI/2011/7 Access and Transparency 178. The SBI agreed that the existing means of engagement of observer organizations could be further enhanced, in the spirit of fostering openness, transparency and inclusiveness, through: … 178. The SBI agreed that the existing means of engagement of observer organizations could be further enhanced, in the spirit of fostering openness, transparency and inclusiveness, through: …
FCCC/SBI/2011/7 Technical/virtual participation 178 (e, ii) Increase the number of meetings that are webcast. 178 (e, ii) Increase the number of meetings that are webcast.
FCCC/SBI/2011/7 Briefings by presiding officers and ES 172. The SBI welcomed the current efforts by the Chairs of the subsidiary bodies and the President of the COP and the CMP to hold in-session briefings and dialogue sessions. It invited the Chairs of the subsidiary bodies and the President of the COP and the CMP to increase these efforts, and encouraged observer organizations to take advantage of these opportunities as a platform for direct dialogue with the President of the COP and the CMP and the Chairs of the subsidiary bodies.
178 (a, iii) Increase opportunities for regular briefings and debriefings as a means for dialogue for observer organizations with presiding officers and Parties;
172. The SBI welcomed the current efforts by the Chairs of the subsidiary bodies and the President of the COP and the CMP to hold in-session briefings and dialogue sessions. It invited the Chairs of the subsidiary bodies and the President of the COP and the CMP to increase these efforts, and encouraged observer organizations to take advantage of these opportunities as a platform for direct dialogue with the President of the COP and the CMP and the Chairs of the subsidiary bodies.
178 (a, iii) Increase opportunities for regular briefings and debriefings as a means for dialogue for observer organizations with presiding officers and Parties;
FCCC/SBI/2011/7 Interventions 178 (a, i) Seek opportunities for observer organizations to make interventions; 178 (a, i) Seek opportunities for observer organizations to make interventions;
FCCC/SBI/2011/7 National level engagement 178 (c) Encouraging all Parties to further engage stakeholders at the national level, including information dissemination and consultation; 178 (c) Encouraging all Parties to further engage stakeholders at the national level, including information dissemination and consultation;
FCCC/SBI/2011/7 Presidency's engagement 178. b. (ii) Engage stakeholders in the lead up to and during the sessions of the COP and the CMP; 178. b. (ii) Engage stakeholders in the lead up to and during the sessions of the COP and the CMP;
FCCC/SBI/2011/7 Registration 178 (e, i). Enable the replacement of names of nominated representatives of admitted observer organizations in the online registration system before and during sessions in exceptional circumstances; 178 (e, i). Enable the replacement of names of nominated representatives of admitted observer organizations in the online registration system before and during sessions in exceptional circumstances;
FCCC/SBI/2011/7 Submissions and inputs 178 (d, i) Post submissions from observer organizations on the UNFCCC website in a way that makes them accessible to Parties;
178 (d, ii) Make use of observer inputs, including scientific and technical, for the preparation of background documentation;
178 (d, i) Post submissions from observer organizations on the UNFCCC website in a way that makes them accessible to Parties;
178 (d, ii) Make use of observer inputs, including scientific and technical, for the preparation of background documentation;
FCCC/SBI/2011/7 Workshop presentation 176. The SBI agreed that existing means of engagement in workshops should be enhanced. Recalling its conclusions from its seventeenth session on attendance by observer organizations at intersessional workshops, the SBI encouraged the chairs of workshops and expert meetings to invite, time permitting, observer organizations to make presentations, while maintaining the balance of participation between Parties and observer organizations. 176. The SBI agreed that existing means of engagement in workshops should be enhanced. Recalling its conclusions from its seventeenth session on attendance by observer organizations at intersessional workshops, the SBI encouraged the chairs of workshops and expert meetings to invite, time permitting, observer organizations to make presentations, while maintaining the balance of participation between Parties and observer organizations.
FCCC/SBI/2011/7 Workshops participation 176. The SBI agreed that existing means of engagement in workshops should be enhanced. Recalling its conclusions from its seventeenth session on attendance by observer organizations at intersessional workshops, the SBI encouraged the chairs of workshops and expert meetings to invite, time permitting, observer organizations to make presentations, while maintaining the balance of participation between Parties and observer organizations.
178 (a, ii) Make greater use of observer inputs in workshops and technical meetings in accordance with the conclusions of the SBI at its seventeenth session in 2002;
176. The SBI agreed that existing means of engagement in workshops should be enhanced. Recalling its conclusions from its seventeenth session on attendance by observer organizations at intersessional workshops, the SBI encouraged the chairs of workshops and expert meetings to invite, time permitting, observer organizations to make presentations, while maintaining the balance of participation between Parties and observer organizations.
178 (a, ii) Make greater use of observer inputs in workshops and technical meetings in accordance with the conclusions of the SBI at its seventeenth session in 2002;
FCCC/SBI/2011/7 Values of participation 169. The SBI recalled the conclusions from its thirty-third session recognizing that the range and value of observer organization engagement is diverse, broad and rich, and that the role and contributions of observer organizations in the UNFCCC process should be enhanced.
171. The SBI reaffirmed the fundamental value of effective participation by observers and the value of contributions from observer organizations to deliberations on substantive issues, while recognizing the recent significant increase in the number of participants from observer organizations.
169. The SBI recalled the conclusions from its thirty-third session recognizing that the range and value of observer organization engagement is diverse, broad and rich, and that the role and contributions of observer organizations in the UNFCCC process should be enhanced.
171. The SBI reaffirmed the fundamental value of effective participation by observers and the value of contributions from observer organizations to deliberations on substantive issues, while recognizing the recent significant increase in the number of participants from observer organizations.
FCCC/SBI/2011/7 Good practices 168. The SBI took note of the information provided by the secretariat on observer organizations in the UNFCCC process and on the good practices from other processes in the United Nations system,and of the report on the in-session workshop to further develop ways to enhance the engagement of observer organizations in the UNFCCC process. 168. The SBI took note of the information provided by the secretariat on observer organizations in the UNFCCC process and on the good practices from other processes in the United Nations system,and of the report on the in-session workshop to further develop ways to enhance the engagement of observer organizations in the UNFCCC process.
FCCC/SBI/2011/7 Size of the venue 178 (b, i) Consider, in their planning and organization, the size of the venue, the distance between buildings and the need to facilitate the participation of all Parties and admitted observer organizations, recalling the conclusions of the SBI at its thirty-second session; 178 (b, i) Consider, in their planning and organization, the size of the venue, the distance between buildings and the need to facilitate the participation of all Parties and admitted observer organizations, recalling the conclusions of the SBI at its thirty-second session;
FCCC/SBI/2011/7 Decision that Oos can attend CMP 167. The SBI recalled the conclusions from its thirty-second session that recommended that the secretariat, in organizing future sessional periods, follow the practice of holding no more than two meetings of plenary and/or contact groups concurrently, with the total number of meetings held concurrently, including informals, not exceeding six, to the extent possible. The SBI noted the existing practices with regard to informals. In the event that there is no contact group for an agenda item, the SBI recommended that at least the first and the last meetings of the informals may be open to observer organizations, recognizing the right of Parties to keep informal meetings closed 167. The SBI recalled the conclusions from its thirty-second session that recommended that the secretariat, in organizing future sessional periods, follow the practice of holding no more than two meetings of plenary and/or contact groups concurrently, with the total number of meetings held concurrently, including informals, not exceeding six, to the extent possible. The SBI noted the existing practices with regard to informals. In the event that there is no contact group for an agenda item, the SBI recommended that at least the first and the last meetings of the informals may be open to observer organizations, recognizing the right of Parties to keep informal meetings closed
FCCC/SBI/2010/L.31 Technical/virtual participation 12. The SBI agreed to continue to address further ways to enhance the existing means of participation for observer organizations, particularly ways to increase opportunities for interventions and other substantive inputs. Efforts should also be made to enhance the use of technical means for participation. 12. The SBI agreed to continue to address further ways to enhance the existing means of participation for observer organizations, particularly ways to increase opportunities for interventions and other substantive inputs. Efforts should also be made to enhance the use of technical means for participation.
FCCC/SBI/2010/L.31 Briefings by presiding officers and ES 11. The SBI recommended that, to enhance information sharing, chairs provide briefings for observer organizations at each session in order to keep them informed of the issues being discussed and of progress being made in informal discussions. 11. The SBI recommended that, to enhance information sharing, chairs provide briefings for observer organizations at each session in order to keep them informed of the issues being discussed and of progress being made in informal discussions.
FCCC/SBI/2010/L.31 National level engagement 8. The SBI expressed its appreciation to the Government of Mexico for its efforts to engage in discussions with observer organizations in the preparations leading up to and during the sixteenth session of the Conference of the Parties and the sixth session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol. 8. The SBI expressed its appreciation to the Government of Mexico for its efforts to engage in discussions with observer organizations in the preparations leading up to and during the sixteenth session of the Conference of the Parties and the sixth session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol.
FCCC/SBI/2010/L.31 Submissions and inputs 10. The SBI recalled its conclusions at its twentieth session that requests for submission of information and views could be extended to non-governmental organizations where appropriate and on the understanding that such submissions would not be issued as official documents, in order not to expand the volume of documentation, but would be made available on the UNFCCC website. The SBI requested the secretariat to continue its efforts to make thesesubmissions more accessible on the UNFCCC website. 10. The SBI recalled its conclusions at its twentieth session that requests for submission of information and views could be extended to non-governmental organizations where appropriate and on the understanding that such submissions would not be issued as official documents, in order not to expand the volume of documentation, but would be made available on the UNFCCC website. The SBI requested the secretariat to continue its efforts to make thesesubmissions more accessible on the UNFCCC website.
FCCC/SBI/2010/L.31 Values of participation 2. The SBI recalled the conclusions at its twentieth session recognizing the fundamental value of effective participation by observers, both in the intergovernmental process and in responding to climate change, and the value of contributions from observer organizations to deliberations on substantive issues. 5. The SBI recognized the important role and value of the participation of all
stakeholders, both governmental and non-governmental, in the UNFCCC process in accordance with Article 7, paragraph 6, of the Convention.
2. The SBI recalled the conclusions at its twentieth session recognizing the fundamental value of effective participation by observers, both in the intergovernmental process and in responding to climate change, and the value of contributions from observer organizations to deliberations on substantive issues. 5. The SBI recognized the important role and value of the participation of all
stakeholders, both governmental and non-governmental, in the UNFCCC process in accordance with Article 7, paragraph 6, of the Convention.
FCCC/SBI/2010/L.31 Constituencies 4. The SBI recalled that there are currently nine observer constituencies under the
UNFCCC process, consistent with the major groups defined as stakeholders in Agenda 21
4. The SBI recalled that there are currently nine observer constituencies under the
UNFCCC process, consistent with the major groups defined as stakeholders in Agenda 21
FCCC/SBI/2010/L.31 Good practices 13. The SBI also recognized the need to take into account best practices from other processes within the United Nations system. The SBI requested the secretariat to keep under review good practices relating to observer organizations in the United Nations system, with a view to benefitting from the experiences of other forums to further enhance the participation of observer organizations in the UNFCCC process. The SBI requested the secretariat to report back on these practices to the SBI at its thirty-fourth session. 13. The SBI also recognized the need to take into account best practices from other processes within the United Nations system. The SBI requested the secretariat to keep under review good practices relating to observer organizations in the United Nations system, with a view to benefitting from the experiences of other forums to further enhance the participation of observer organizations in the UNFCCC process. The SBI requested the secretariat to report back on these practices to the SBI at its thirty-fourth session.
FCCC/SBI/2010/L.21 Interventions 4. The SBI agreed that arrangements be made for the delivery of concise national statements by ministers and other heads of delegation, with a recommended time limit of three minutes, and also concise statements by representatives of intergovernmental organizations and non-governmental
organizations, with a recommended time limit of two minutes, in the joint meetings of the COP and the CMP during the high-level segment.
4. The SBI agreed that arrangements be made for the delivery of concise national statements by ministers and other heads of delegation, with a recommended time limit of three minutes, and also concise statements by representatives of intergovernmental organizations and non-governmental
organizations, with a recommended time limit of two minutes, in the joint meetings of the COP and the CMP during the high-level segment.
FCCC/SBI/2010/L.21 Submissions and inputs 19. In order to facilitate these discussions, the SBI invited Parties and observer organizations to submit their views on this matter to the secretariat no later than 16 August 2010. 19. In order to facilitate these discussions, the SBI invited Parties and observer organizations to submit their views on this matter to the secretariat no later than 16 August 2010.
FCCC/SBI/2010/L.21 Values of participation 18. The SBI affirmed the value of the engagement of observer organizations as contained in Article 7, paragraph 2 (l), of the Convention, and acknowledged the important role of civil society re presentation in the intergovernmental process 18. The SBI affirmed the value of the engagement of observer organizations as contained in Article 7, paragraph 2 (l), of the Convention, and acknowledged the important role of civil society re presentation in the intergovernmental process
FCCC/SBI/2010/L.21 Constituencies 18. The SBI welcomed the continued interest of observer organizations and noted that the UNFCCC process now covers all nine major groups in Agenda 21. 18. The SBI welcomed the continued interest of observer organizations and noted that the UNFCCC process now covers all nine major groups in Agenda 21.
FCCC/SBI/2010/L.21 Size of the venue 18. The SBI encouraged hosts of future sessions of the COP and the CMP to consider, in their planning and organization, the size of the venue and the need to facilitate the participation of all Parties and admitted observer organizations. 18. The SBI encouraged hosts of future sessions of the COP and the CMP to consider, in their planning and organization, the size of the venue and the need to facilitate the participation of all Parties and admitted observer organizations.
FCCC/SBI/2010/27 Technical/virtual participation 150. ...Efforts should also be made to enhance the use of technical means for participation. 150. ...Efforts should also be made to enhance the use of technical means for participation.
FCCC/SBI/2010/27 Briefings by presiding officers and ES 149. The SBI recommended that, in order to enhance information sharing, chairs provide briefings for observer organizations at each session in order to keep them informed of the issues being discussed and of the progress being made in informal discussions. 149. The SBI recommended that, in order to enhance information sharing, chairs provide briefings for observer organizations at each session in order to keep them informed of the issues being discussed and of the progress being made in informal discussions.
FCCC/SBI/2010/27 Presidency's engagement 146. The SBI expressed its appreciation to the Government of Mexico for its efforts to engage in discussions with observer organizations in the preparations leading up to and 146. The SBI expressed its appreciation to the Government of Mexico for its efforts to engage in discussions with observer organizations in the preparations leading up to and
FCCC/SBI/2010/27 inputs for background documents 150. The SBI agreed to continue to address further ways to enhance the existing means of participation for observer organizations, particularly ways to increase opportunities for interventions and other substantive inputs 150. The SBI agreed to continue to address further ways to enhance the existing means of participation for observer organizations, particularly ways to increase opportunities for interventions and other substantive inputs
FCCC/SBI/2010/27 Submissions and inputs 139. The SBI considered the submissions from Parties and observer organizations…
148. The SBI recalled its conclusions at its twentieth session that requests for submission of information and views could be extended to NGOs where appropriate and on the understanding that such submissions would not be issued as official documents, in order not to expand the volume of documentation, but would be made available on the UNFCCC website.
139. The SBI considered the submissions from Parties and observer organizations…
148. The SBI recalled its conclusions at its twentieth session that requests for submission of information and views could be extended to NGOs where appropriate and on the understanding that such submissions would not be issued as official documents, in order not to expand the volume of documentation, but would be made available on the UNFCCC website.
FCCC/SBI/2010/27 Values of participation 140. The SBI recalled the conclusions at its twentieth session recognizing the fundamental value of effective participation by observers...,
141. The SBI recognized that the range and value of observer organization engagement is diverse, broad and rich, and that the role and contributions of observer organizations should be enhanced in the UNFCCC intergovernmental process.
140. The SBI recalled the conclusions at its twentieth session recognizing the fundamental value of effective participation by observers...,
141. The SBI recognized that the range and value of observer organization engagement is diverse, broad and rich, and that the role and contributions of observer organizations should be enhanced in the UNFCCC intergovernmental process.
FCCC/SBI/2010/27 Constituencies 142. The SBI recalled that there are currently nine observer constituencies under the UNFCCC process, consistent with the major groups defined as stakeholders in Agenda 21 142. The SBI recalled that there are currently nine observer constituencies under the UNFCCC process, consistent with the major groups defined as stakeholders in Agenda 21
FCCC/SBI/2010/27 Good practices 151. In addition, the SBI recognized the need to take into account best practices from other processes within the United Nations system. It requested the secretariat to keep under
review good practices relating to observer organizations in the United Nations system, with a view to benefitting from the experiences of other forums to further enhance the ...
151. In addition, the SBI recognized the need to take into account best practices from other processes within the United Nations system. It requested the secretariat to keep under
review good practices relating to observer organizations in the United Nations system, with a view to benefitting from the experiences of other forums to further enhance the ...
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Publicity stunts 33. Demonstrations: Some submissions considered the current approach to controlling demonstrations and actions to be vague and overly restrictive. 33. Demonstrations: Some submissions considered the current approach to controlling demonstrations and actions to be vague and overly restrictive.
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Access and Transparency 16. ... It was widely recognized that the participation of civil society is essential to ensure transparency, strengthen accountability and keep the issue of climate change high on the public agenda.
17. ...Organizations may attend formal meetings as observers and, in accordance with decision 18/CP.4, the presiding officers of Convention bodies may invite observer organizations to attend contact groups.
25. NGOs included in Party delegations...
29. Access to negotiation sessions: many submissions...
16. ... It was widely recognized that the participation of civil society is essential to ensure transparency, strengthen accountability and keep the issue of climate change high on the public agenda.
17. ...Organizations may attend formal meetings as observers and, in accordance with decision 18/CP.4, the presiding officers of Convention bodies may invite observer organizations to attend contact groups.
25. NGOs included in Party delegations...
29. Access to negotiation sessions: many submissions...
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Code of Conduct 38. A number of the submissions addressed the guidelines for participation… 39. In this context, some submissions addressed the subject of sanctions for ... 38. A number of the submissions addressed the guidelines for participation… 39. In this context, some submissions addressed the subject of sanctions for ...
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Financial support 40. (c) Financial support for observers and the secretariat... 40. (c) Financial support for observers and the secretariat...
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Technical/virtual participation 27. webcast and CCTV...40.(d) Technology fair... 27. webcast and CCTV...40.(d) Technology fair...
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Briefings by presiding officers and ES 28. Briefings: To keep observers organizations informed… 28. Briefings: To keep observers organizations informed…
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Interventions 17. ...They also deliver statements, access official documentation and distribute their own documents. 20. ...Interventions: Some submissions called for increased opportunities for constituencies to make interventions and actively engage in the negotiations, while others called for guaranteed opportunities to do so. Some also called for a more flexible approach whereby each constituency, or at least a minimum number thereof, has the opportunity to be included on the list of speakers to enable them to intervene in every session, in the same manner as Parties. This would also require flexibility with regard to timing. However, other submissions did not support the idea of increasing the opportunities for interventions, as this would take up too much negotiating time and sessions already frequently run long. 17. ...They also deliver statements, access official documentation and distribute their own documents. 20. ...Interventions: Some submissions called for increased opportunities for constituencies to make interventions and actively engage in the negotiations, while others called for guaranteed opportunities to do so. Some also called for a more flexible approach whereby each constituency, or at least a minimum number thereof, has the opportunity to be included on the list of speakers to enable them to intervene in every session, in the same manner as Parties. This would also require flexibility with regard to timing. However, other submissions did not support the idea of increasing the opportunities for interventions, as this would take up too much negotiating time and sessions already frequently run long.
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Contact groups 17. ...Organizations may attend formal meetings as observers and, in accordance with decision 18/CP.4, the presiding officers of Convention bodies may invite observer organizations to attend contact groups. 17. ...Organizations may attend formal meetings as observers and, in accordance with decision 18/CP.4, the presiding officers of Convention bodies may invite observer organizations to attend contact groups.
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Presidency's engagement 19. ...Furthermore, support was expressed for the Government of Mexico for its dialogue with observer organizations in preparation for COP 16 and CMP 6. 19. ...Furthermore, support was expressed for the Government of Mexico for its dialogue with observer organizations in preparation for COP 16 and CMP 6.
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Registration 30. Registration: The submissions generally called for an expedited, flexible and client-friendly nomination and registration system…. 30. Registration: The submissions generally called for an expedited, flexible and client-friendly nomination and registration system….
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Submissions and inputs 22. Written submissions: It was suggested that civil society should be permitted to make submissions on all substantive issues, even without a formal request. It was further proposed that all submissions made by civil society should be issued as official UNFCCC documents and be included in the document database on the UNFCCC website. 22. Written submissions: It was suggested that civil society should be permitted to make submissions on all substantive issues, even without a formal request. It was further proposed that all submissions made by civil society should be issued as official UNFCCC documents and be included in the document database on the UNFCCC website.
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Workshops participation 17. ...Observers are also active during intersessional periods and are normallyinvited to participate in workshops.
24. Workshops: Some submissions noted…
17. ...Observers are also active during intersessional periods and are normallyinvited to participate in workshops.
24. Workshops: Some submissions noted…
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Constituencies 32.Constituency focal points: Some submissions called for additional focal points within each constituency…
34. NGOs have formed themselves into constituencies…
35. A number of the submissions called for the official recognition of new constituency groups....
36. A number of the submissions called for an enhanced role for specific constituencie...
37. In addition, some submissions noted that any changes to the role of the constituencies...
32.Constituency focal points: Some submissions called for additional focal points within each constituency…
34. NGOs have formed themselves into constituencies…
35. A number of the submissions called for the official recognition of new constituency groups....
36. A number of the submissions called for an enhanced role for specific constituencie...
37. In addition, some submissions noted that any changes to the role of the constituencies...
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Good practices 18. ...The submissions also highlighted studies undertaken by the secretariat on ways to enhance observer participation and draw on best practices from other processes within the United Nations system. 18. ...The submissions also highlighted studies undertaken by the secretariat on ways to enhance observer participation and draw on best practices from other processes within the United Nations system.
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Aarhus Convention 21. ...Also highlighted was the Aarhus process, in which NGOs have the same speaking rights as Parties and form part of drafting groups producing negotiating text during meetings of the Parties. 21. ...Also highlighted was the Aarhus process, in which NGOs have the same speaking rights as Parties and form part of drafting groups producing negotiating text during meetings of the Parties.
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Size of the venue 31. Venues: Many submissions underscored that… 31. Venues: Many submissions underscored that…
FCCC/SBI/2010/16 Side Events and Exhibits 23. Side events: A number of the submissions supported the approach of clustering side events based on topic, target group or stakeholder group…. 23. Side events: A number of the submissions supported the approach of clustering side events based on topic, target group or stakeholder group….
FCCC/SBI/2010/10 Values of participation 166. The SBI affirmed the value of the engagement of observer organizations as contained in Article 7, paragraph 2(l), of the Convention, and acknowledged the important role of civil society representation in the intergovernmental process. 166. The SBI affirmed the value of the engagement of observer organizations as contained in Article 7, paragraph 2(l), of the Convention, and acknowledged the important role of civil society representation in the intergovernmental process.
FCCC/SBI/2010/10 Constituencies 166. The SBI welcomed the continued interest of observer organizations and noted that the UNFCCC process now covers all nine major groups in Agenda 21 166. The SBI welcomed the continued interest of observer organizations and noted that the UNFCCC process now covers all nine major groups in Agenda 21
FCCC/SBI/2010/10 Size of the venue 166. ...The SBI encouraged hosts of future sessions of the COP and the CMP to consider, in their planning and organization, the size of the venue and the need to facilitate the participation of all Parties and admitted observer organizations. 166. ...The SBI encouraged hosts of future sessions of the COP and the CMP to consider, in their planning and organization, the size of the venue and the need to facilitate the participation of all Parties and admitted observer organizations.
FCCC/SBI/2010/8 Interventions 34. Observer organizations continue to make use of the opportunity to make interventions at sessions and… 34. Observer organizations continue to make use of the opportunity to make interventions at sessions and…
FCCC/SBI/2010/8 Admission/observer status
33. Applications for admission in 2009 alone were nearly seven times the average annual number of applications received between 2003 and 2008, taking
the total cumulative number of NGOs admitted by 2009 to 1,372.
33. Applications for admission in 2009 alone were nearly seven times the average annual number of applications received between 2003 and 2008, taking
the total cumulative number of NGOs admitted by 2009 to 1,372.
FCCC/SBI/2010/8 Registration 36. With regard to logistics, registration and access, and taking into account the Copenhagen conference, the secretariat is undertaking an assessment of these issues, with a view to avoiding, in collaboration with the host country, repetition at future conferences of the problems faced in Copenhagen. 36. With regard to logistics, registration and access, and taking into account the Copenhagen conference, the secretariat is undertaking an assessment of these issues, with a view to avoiding, in collaboration with the host country, repetition at future conferences of the problems faced in Copenhagen.
FCCC/SBI/2010/8 Values of participation 33. Article 7, paragraph 2 (l), of the Convention recognizes the value of the engagement of NGOs, and Parties have acknowledged the important role of civil society representation in the process. 33. Article 7, paragraph 2 (l), of the Convention recognizes the value of the engagement of NGOs, and Parties have acknowledged the important role of civil society representation in the process.
FCCC/SBI/2010/8 Constituencies 35. ...A further development among the NGOs admitted is the provisional recognition of three additional constituencies, namely Farmers, Women and Gender, and Youth…. 35. ...A further development among the NGOs admitted is the provisional recognition of three additional constituencies, namely Farmers, Women and Gender, and Youth….
FCCC/SBI/2010/8 Side Events and Exhibits 34. ...Numerous side events, exhibits and press briefings are organized in order to inform those involved in the process of their views and works...
37. ... the importance of side events and exhibits as a major vehicle for the engagement of observer organizations;
34. ...Numerous side events, exhibits and press briefings are organized in order to inform those involved in the process of their views and works...
37. ... the importance of side events and exhibits as a major vehicle for the engagement of observer organizations;
FCCC/SBI/2009/L.10 Values of participation 12. The SBI took note of the information on the positive developments in the practices for the participation of observer organizations in the UNFCCC process, contained in document FCCC/SBI/2009/7. 12. The SBI took note of the information on the positive developments in the practices for the participation of observer organizations in the UNFCCC process, contained in document FCCC/SBI/2009/7.
FCCC/SBI/2009/8 Values of participation 121. The SBI took note of the information on the positive developments in the practices for the participation of observer organizations in the UNFCCC process, contained in document FCCC/SBI/2009/7. 121. The SBI took note of the information on the positive developments in the practices for the participation of observer organizations in the UNFCCC process, contained in document FCCC/SBI/2009/7.
FCCC/SBI/2009/7 Interventions 35. During sessions, observer organizations continue to make use of the opportunity to make interventions and to meet officials of the Convention bodies in order to feed inputs into the process. Side events, exhibits and press briefings are organized in order to inform those involved in the process of their views and works. 35. During sessions, observer organizations continue to make use of the opportunity to make interventions and to meet officials of the Convention bodies in order to feed inputs into the process. Side events, exhibits and press briefings are organized in order to inform those involved in the process of their views and works.
FCCC/SBI/2009/7 inputs for background documents 34. ... A total of 45 submissions by observer organizations were incorporated into the document and may serve as input to future texts. 34. ... A total of 45 submissions by observer organizations were incorporated into the document and may serve as input to future texts.
FCCC/SBI/2009/7 Constituencies 32. ...However, there have been a number of positive developments within the UNFCCC process, such as the establishment of a sixth constituency, inclusion of views from observers in official documents and making greater use of side events. 33. In December 2008, the secretariat established a sixth constituency, for the trade union non-governmental organizations. 32. ...However, there have been a number of positive developments within the UNFCCC process, such as the establishment of a sixth constituency, inclusion of views from observers in official documents and making greater use of side events. 33. In December 2008, the secretariat established a sixth constituency, for the trade union non-governmental organizations.
FCCC/SBI/2009/7 Good practices 31. The SBI, at its twenty-sixth session, requested the secretariat to monitor and incorporate into its current practices any relevant development of good practices within the United Nations system in order to further enhance the participation of observer organizations, and to report back to the SBI as appropriate or at the latest at its thirtieth session 31. The SBI, at its twenty-sixth session, requested the secretariat to monitor and incorporate into its current practices any relevant development of good practices within the United Nations system in order to further enhance the participation of observer organizations, and to report back to the SBI as appropriate or at the latest at its thirtieth session
FCCC/SBI/2009/7 Side Events and Exhibits 36. The number of applications to hold side events doubled in 2007 and tripled in 2008 compared with 2006. In order to maximize the use of limited resources and the number of organizations participating in side events at COP 14, the secretariat requested applicants to consolidate their side event proposals. In the case of the United Nations bodies and conventions, their proposals were consolidated into thematic groups following a decision by the Chief Executives Board of the United Nations. This provided a more constructive and focused approach to their side events, and elicited a positive response from both organizers and participants. 36. The number of applications to hold side events doubled in 2007 and tripled in 2008 compared with 2006. In order to maximize the use of limited resources and the number of organizations participating in side events at COP 14, the secretariat requested applicants to consolidate their side event proposals. In the case of the United Nations bodies and conventions, their proposals were consolidated into thematic groups following a decision by the Chief Executives Board of the United Nations. This provided a more constructive and focused approach to their side events, and elicited a positive response from both organizers and participants.
FCCC/SBI/2007/15 Good practices 135. The SBI took note of the information contained in document FCCC/SBI/2007/9 and requested the secretariat to monitor and incorporate into its current practices any relevant development of good practices within the United Nations system in order to further enhance the participation of observer organizations, and to report back to the SBI as appropriate or at the latest at its thirtieth session. 135. The SBI took note of the information contained in document FCCC/SBI/2007/9 and requested the secretariat to monitor and incorporate into its current practices any relevant development of good practices within the United Nations system in order to further enhance the participation of observer organizations, and to report back to the SBI as appropriate or at the latest at its thirtieth session.
FCCC/SBI/2007/L.7 Good practices 9. The SBI took note of the information contained in document FCCC/SBI/2007/9 and requested the secretariat to monitor and incorporate into its current practices any relevant development of good practices within the United Nations system in order to further enhance the participation of observer organizations, and to report back to the SBI as appropriate or at the latest at its thirtieth session (June 2009). 9. The SBI took note of the information contained in document FCCC/SBI/2007/9 and requested the secretariat to monitor and incorporate into its current practices any relevant development of good practices within the United Nations system in order to further enhance the participation of observer organizations, and to report back to the SBI as appropriate or at the latest at its thirtieth session (June 2009).
FCCC/SBI/2007/9 Financial support 21. The United Nations Development Group established a Working Group on Civil Society to take forward the recommendations of the Secretary-General to establish civil society focal points in each United Nations country office and to establish a United Nations Civil Society Trust Fund. The focal points will coordinate civil society engagement by the United Nations at the country level. The Trust Fund will focus on actions to stimulate and implement innovative initiatives and strategies for greater engagement between the United Nations and civil society organizations. 21. The United Nations Development Group established a Working Group on Civil Society to take forward the recommendations of the Secretary-General to establish civil society focal points in each United Nations country office and to establish a United Nations Civil Society Trust Fund. The focal points will coordinate civil society engagement by the United Nations at the country level. The Trust Fund will focus on actions to stimulate and implement innovative initiatives and strategies for greater engagement between the United Nations and civil society organizations.
FCCC/SBI/2007/9 Interventions 24. Observer organizations regularly use the opportunity, as far as their resources allow, to participate in the growing number of workshops, provide submissions and make interventions on matters of concern during sessions 24. Observer organizations regularly use the opportunity, as far as their resources allow, to participate in the growing number of workshops, provide submissions and make interventions on matters of concern during sessions
FCCC/SBI/2007/9 National level engagement 21. The focal points will coordinate civil society engagement by the United Nations at the country level. 21. The focal points will coordinate civil society engagement by the United Nations at the country level.
FCCC/SBI/2007/9 Submissions and inputs 24. Observer organizations regularly use the opportunity, as far as their resources allow, to participate in the growing number of workshops, provide submissions and make interventions on matters of concern during sessions 24. Observer organizations regularly use the opportunity, as far as their resources allow, to participate in the growing number of workshops, provide submissions and make interventions on matters of concern during sessions
FCCC/SBI/2007/9 Workshops participation 24. Observer organizations regularly use the opportunity, as far as their resources allow, to participate in the growing number of workshops, provide submissions and make interventions on matters of concern during sessions 24. Observer organizations regularly use the opportunity, as far as their resources allow, to participate in the growing number of workshops, provide submissions and make interventions on matters of concern during sessions
FCCC/SBI/2007/9 Good practices 19. ...The SBI agreed to consider, at its twenty-sixth session, the participation of observer organizations in the Convention process, based on a report from the secretariat on the experience gained from current arrangements and any relevant developments of good practice within the United Nations system. The SBI agreed to consider, at its twenty-sixth session, the participation of observer organizations in the Convention process, based on a report from the secretariat on the experience gained from current arrangements and any relevant developments of good practice within the United Nations system. 19. ...The SBI agreed to consider, at its twenty-sixth session, the participation of observer organizations in the Convention process, based on a report from the secretariat on the experience gained from current arrangements and any relevant developments of good practice within the United Nations system. The SBI agreed to consider, at its twenty-sixth session, the participation of observer organizations in the Convention process, based on a report from the secretariat on the experience gained from current arrangements and any relevant developments of good practice within the United Nations system.
FCCC/SBI/2007/9 Aarhus Convention 22. Further developments have taken place under the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters (Aarhus Convention) of 1998. In May 2005, the Parties to the Aarhus Convention adopted the Almaty Guidelines, which promote the principles of access to information, public participation and access to justice in international forumsdealing with matters relating to the environment. A task force has been established by the Parties to the Aarhus Convention to consult with international forums to gain their views on the Almaty Guidelines and to learn from any relevant experience 22. Further developments have taken place under the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters (Aarhus Convention) of 1998. In May 2005, the Parties to the Aarhus Convention adopted the Almaty Guidelines, which promote the principles of access to information, public participation and access to justice in international forumsdealing with matters relating to the environment. A task force has been established by the Parties to the Aarhus Convention to consult with international forums to gain their views on the Almaty Guidelines and to learn from any relevant experience
FCCC/KP/CMP/2005/8/ Admission/observer status
2. c (i). Organizations admitted as observers to previous sessions of the Conference of the Parties would be admitted to the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol at its first session;
2. c (ii). A single process would be used for the admission of observer organizations to sessions of the Conference of the Parties and of the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol, with decisions on admission of observer organizations being taken by the Conference of the Parties.
2. c (i). Organizations admitted as observers to previous sessions of the Conference of the Parties would be admitted to the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol at its first session;
2. c (ii). A single process would be used for the admission of observer organizations to sessions of the Conference of the Parties and of the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol, with decisions on admission of observer organizations being taken by the Conference of the Parties.
FCCC/KP/CMP/2005/8/Ad Access and Transparency IV. E. Rule 26. Subject to the need to protect confidential in formation, the principle of transparency should apply to all the work of the Executive Board, encompassing the timely public availability of documentation and channels through which external comments by all Parties and all UNFCCC accredited observers and stakeholders can be submitted for consideration by the Board. The posting of the Board’s meetings on the Internet is one way to ensure transparency.
IV. E. Rule 27. 1.Meetings of the Executive Board shall be open to attendance, as observers, by all Parties and by all UNFCCC accredited observers and stakeholders, except where otherwise decided by the Executive Board.
IV. E. Rule 27. 2. In the context of paragraph 1 above, the Executive Board may decide, in the interest of economy and efficiency, to limit attendance at its meetings to members, alternate members and secretariat support staff. In such instances, the Executive Board shall take all practicable steps to accommodate in other ways the interests of Parties, non-Parties to the Kyoto Protocol that are Parties to the Convention and accredited UNFCCC observers and stakeholders to observe its proceedings, except when the Executive Board decides to close all or a portion of a meeting.
IV. E. Rule 26. Subject to the need to protect confidential in formation, the principle of transparency should apply to all the work of the Executive Board, encompassing the timely public availability of documentation and channels through which external comments by all Parties and all UNFCCC accredited observers and stakeholders can be submitted for consideration by the Board. The posting of the Board’s meetings on the Internet is one way to ensure transparency.
IV. E. Rule 27. 1.Meetings of the Executive Board shall be open to attendance, as observers, by all Parties and by all UNFCCC accredited observers and stakeholders, except where otherwise decided by the Executive Board.
IV. E. Rule 27. 2. In the context of paragraph 1 above, the Executive Board may decide, in the interest of economy and efficiency, to limit attendance at its meetings to members, alternate members and secretariat support staff. In such instances, the Executive Board shall take all practicable steps to accommodate in other ways the interests of Parties, non-Parties to the Kyoto Protocol that are Parties to the Convention and accredited UNFCCC observers and stakeholders to observe its proceedings, except when the Executive Board decides to close all or a portion of a meeting.
FCCC/KP/CMP/2005/8/Ad Interventions IV. E. Rule 27. 3. Observers may, upon invitation by the Board, make presentations relating to matters under consideration by the Board. IV. E. Rule 27. 3. Observers may, upon invitation by the Board, make presentations relating to matters under consideration by the Board.
FCCC/SBI/2005/Misc.1 Financial support 1. The Subsidiary Body for Implementation, at its twentieth session, agreed to continue its consideration of effective participation in the intergovernmental process at its twenty-second session on the basis of submissions received before 31 January 2005 (FCCC/SBI/2004/10, para. 99). 1. The Subsidiary Body for Implementation, at its twentieth session, agreed to continue its consideration of effective participation in the intergovernmental process at its twenty-second session on the basis of submissions received before 31 January 2005 (FCCC/SBI/2004/10, para. 99).
FCCC/SBI/2005/Misc.1 Submissions and inputs pdf-icon Final draft. CAN Submission on Promoting Effective Participation in the Convention Process January 2005 (LINK) pdf-icon Final draft. CAN Submission on Promoting Effective Participation in the Convention Process January 2005 (LINK)
FCCC/SBI/2005/10 SG recommendations 69. The SBI took note of the information provided by the secretariat on relevant initiatives in the United Nations focused on enhancing the relationship between the United Nations system and civil society, including the report of the Secretary-General in response to the report by the Panel of Eminent Persons on United Nations–Civil Society Relations.
70. The SBI noted that many of the steps recommended by the Secretary-General are already part of established UNFCCC practice to promote observer participation. In this context, the SBI recalled the related conclusions adopted at its twentieth session and agreed that the consideration of steps to further enhance the participation of observer organizations would take into account experience with current practice. 71. The SBI requested the secretariat to identify possible ways to further enhance the participation of observer organizations in the Convention process, drawing on the outcomes of the consideration by the General Assembly of the recommendations of the Secretary-General.
69. The SBI took note of the information provided by the secretariat on relevant initiatives in the United Nations focused on enhancing the relationship between the United Nations system and civil society, including the report of the Secretary-General in response to the report by the Panel of Eminent Persons on United Nations–Civil Society Relations.
70. The SBI noted that many of the steps recommended by the Secretary-General are already part of established UNFCCC practice to promote observer participation. In this context, the SBI recalled the related conclusions adopted at its twentieth session and agreed that the consideration of steps to further enhance the participation of observer organizations would take into account experience with current practice. 71. The SBI requested the secretariat to identify possible ways to further enhance the participation of observer organizations in the Convention process, drawing on the outcomes of the consideration by the General Assembly of the recommendations of the Secretary-General.
FCCC/SBI/2005/10 Good practices 72. The SBI agreed to consider, at its twenty-sixth session (May 2007), the participation of observer organizations in the Convention process, based on a report from the secretariat on the experience gained from current arrangements and any relevant developments of good practice within the United Nations system. 72. The SBI agreed to consider, at its twenty-sixth session (May 2007), the participation of observer organizations in the Convention process, based on a report from the secretariat on the experience gained from current arrangements and any relevant developments of good practice within the United Nations system.
FCCC/SBI/2005/5 Access and Transparency 15. NGOs participate actively in the Convention process. All meetings of the COP and its subsidiary bodies are open to attendance by NGOs, as are contact groups. Representatives of NGOs are often given the opportunity to make interventions on behalf of groups of NGOs in plenary meetings, including of the COP. They are also invited to address the high-level segment of the COP. Representatives of NGOs are also invited to participate in workshops, albeit in limited numbers. Meetings between NGOs and presiding officers are organized during sessions to exchange views. 15. NGOs participate actively in the Convention process. All meetings of the COP and its subsidiary bodies are open to attendance by NGOs, as are contact groups. Representatives of NGOs are often given the opportunity to make interventions on behalf of groups of NGOs in plenary meetings, including of the COP. They are also invited to address the high-level segment of the COP. Representatives of NGOs are also invited to participate in workshops, albeit in limited numbers. Meetings between NGOs and presiding officers are organized during sessions to exchange views.
FCCC/SBI/2005/5 Code of Conduct 23. The Secretary-General suggested that Member States could consider drawing up a code of conduct to reinforce the adherence by NGOs to the aims of the Charter of the United Nations and to act in accordance with the intergovernmental character of the organization. 25. The secretariat has developed guidelines for the participation of representatives of NGOs at meetings of the UNFCCC bodies6. These guidelines seek to provide information reflecting current practice regarding attendance of observers at sessions and meetings of the UNFCCC. They are in line with those governing NGO participation at sessions of other bodies in the United Nations system. They can be found on the UNFCCC web site. 23. The Secretary-General suggested that Member States could consider drawing up a code of conduct to reinforce the adherence by NGOs to the aims of the Charter of the United Nations and to act in accordance with the intergovernmental character of the organization. 25. The secretariat has developed guidelines for the participation of representatives of NGOs at meetings of the UNFCCC bodies6. These guidelines seek to provide information reflecting current practice regarding attendance of observers at sessions and meetings of the UNFCCC. They are in line with those governing NGO participation at sessions of other bodies in the United Nations system. They can be found on the UNFCCC web site.
FCCC/SBI/2005/5 Financial support 20. The unbalanced participation of NGOs from developing countries in intergovernmental processes was highlighted. The Secretary-General pledged to establish a single trust fund incorporating and expanding existing funds to support travel and accommodation of representatives of accredited NGOs from developing countries to attend intergovernmental meetings. 21. The SBI, at its twentieth session, recognized that NGO participation, although extensive, was not geographically balanced, with fewer NGOs attending from developing countries and countries with economies in transition (EIT countries). The SBI also recognized the importance of more globally representative participation in sessions and workshops and encouraged interested Parties to support attendance by NGOs from developing countries and EIT countries that lack the necessary resources 20. The unbalanced participation of NGOs from developing countries in intergovernmental processes was highlighted. The Secretary-General pledged to establish a single trust fund incorporating and expanding existing funds to support travel and accommodation of representatives of accredited NGOs from developing countries to attend intergovernmental meetings. 21. The SBI, at its twentieth session, recognized that NGO participation, although extensive, was not geographically balanced, with fewer NGOs attending from developing countries and countries with economies in transition (EIT countries). The SBI also recognized the importance of more globally representative participation in sessions and workshops and encouraged interested Parties to support attendance by NGOs from developing countries and EIT countries that lack the necessary resources
FCCC/SBI/2005/5 SG recommendations 12. On-going activities to strengthen relationships with NGOs are being implemented in the United Nations system, including in the General Assembly, Security Council and Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC). The Secretary-General suggested: (a) Expanding and standardizing some mechanisms, such as the format for interactive hearings between representatives of NGOs and Member States;
(b) Strengthening the relationship of the Security Council with civil society e.g. conducting some form of assessment, with input from selected NGOs, on completion of each peace
mission;
(c) Initiating multi-stakeholder task forces on specific issues. 29. The Secretary-General welcomed the emphasis on increased engagement of NGOs with the United Nations system at the country level and recommended two sets of actions, one focused on enhancing the capacity of NGOs at the country level and the other on enhancing the ability of the United Nations resident coordinator system to engage with civil society. The pursuit of the Millennium Development Goals, the preparation of the common country assessments and the United Nations Development Assistance Framework are expected to strengthen relationships between civil society and the United Nations. 31. As part of the Secretary-General’s second reform package from 2002, a Partnerships Office will be established by merging the United Nations Fund for International Partnerships (UNFIP) and the Global Compact Office. 33. (a) Maintaining a systematic and sustained dialogue with the NGO community(b) Incorporating constituency engagement and partnership concerns into the United Nations human resources processes, including the provision of training opportunities for all staff to improve their skills and to learn to factor NGO considerations into their work.
12. On-going activities to strengthen relationships with NGOs are being implemented in the United Nations system, including in the General Assembly, Security Council and Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC). The Secretary-General suggested: (a) Expanding and standardizing some mechanisms, such as the format for interactive hearings between representatives of NGOs and Member States;
(b) Strengthening the relationship of the Security Council with civil society e.g. conducting some form of assessment, with input from selected NGOs, on completion of each peace
mission;
(c) Initiating multi-stakeholder task forces on specific issues. 29. The Secretary-General welcomed the emphasis on increased engagement of NGOs with the United Nations system at the country level and recommended two sets of actions, one focused on enhancing the capacity of NGOs at the country level and the other on enhancing the ability of the United Nations resident coordinator system to engage with civil society. The pursuit of the Millennium Development Goals, the preparation of the common country assessments and the United Nations Development Assistance Framework are expected to strengthen relationships between civil society and the United Nations. 31. As part of the Secretary-General’s second reform package from 2002, a Partnerships Office will be established by merging the United Nations Fund for International Partnerships (UNFIP) and the Global Compact Office. 33. (a) Maintaining a systematic and sustained dialogue with the NGO community(b) Incorporating constituency engagement and partnership concerns into the United Nations human resources processes, including the provision of training opportunities for all staff to improve their skills and to learn to factor NGO considerations into their work.
FCCC/SBI/2005/5 Technical/virtual participation 12(a) Expanding and standardizing some mechanisms, such as the format for interactive hearings between representatives of NGOs and Member States; 26. The Secretary-General recommended improvements in the United Nations Secretariat’s dialogue with NGOs, including through the use of Internet-based techniques to survey public opinion, to raise awareness and to monitor global commitments. Other suggestions included the establishment of a central database of NGOs, maintaining information on best practices relating to NGOs, and improved access to documents. The secretariat is making efforts to enhance its web-based tools to disseminate information and to provide a focus for NGO-related climate change exchanges. 28. The secretariat is making efforts to enhance its web-based tools to disseminate information and to provide a focus for NGO-related climate change exchanges. Some progress was possible in the context of the relaunch of the UNFCCC web site in 2004 (see also paragraph 16 above on submissions from NGOs). The secretariat points to its clean development mechanism web pages as a good example of what can be achieved through intensive investment to facilitate effective NGO participation. 12(a) Expanding and standardizing some mechanisms, such as the format for interactive hearings between representatives of NGOs and Member States; 26. The Secretary-General recommended improvements in the United Nations Secretariat’s dialogue with NGOs, including through the use of Internet-based techniques to survey public opinion, to raise awareness and to monitor global commitments. Other suggestions included the establishment of a central database of NGOs, maintaining information on best practices relating to NGOs, and improved access to documents. The secretariat is making efforts to enhance its web-based tools to disseminate information and to provide a focus for NGO-related climate change exchanges. 28. The secretariat is making efforts to enhance its web-based tools to disseminate information and to provide a focus for NGO-related climate change exchanges. Some progress was possible in the context of the relaunch of the UNFCCC web site in 2004 (see also paragraph 16 above on submissions from NGOs). The secretariat points to its clean development mechanism web pages as a good example of what can be achieved through intensive investment to facilitate effective NGO participation.
FCCC/SBI/2005/5 Admission/observer status
22. The Panel made five proposals:
(a) NGOs be accredited to participate in the work of the General Assembly
(b) A single accreditation process be established for all United Nations forums
(c) A committee of the General Assembly be given the responsibility to review all NGO applications for accreditation
(d) The process of accreditation be streamlined
(e) The rights and responsibilities pertaining to NGO participation be reviewed and harmonized. 38. The SBI is invited to complete the discussion of admission procedures which was initiated at SBI 20. In this context, it may wish to consider the information provided and invite the secretariat to review changes in the accreditation of NGOs in the United Nations system, with a view to incorporating any good practices into the working procedures currently used by the secretariat.
22. The Panel made five proposals:
(a) NGOs be accredited to participate in the work of the General Assembly
(b) A single accreditation process be established for all United Nations forums
(c) A committee of the General Assembly be given the responsibility to review all NGO applications for accreditation
(d) The process of accreditation be streamlined
(e) The rights and responsibilities pertaining to NGO participation be reviewed and harmonized. 38. The SBI is invited to complete the discussion of admission procedures which was initiated at SBI 20. In this context, it may wish to consider the information provided and invite the secretariat to review changes in the accreditation of NGOs in the United Nations system, with a view to incorporating any good practices into the working procedures currently used by the secretariat.
FCCC/SBI/2005/5 Registration 15. NGOs participate actively in the Convention process. All meetings of the COP and its subsidiary bodies are open to attendance by NGOs, as are contact groups. Representatives of NGOs are often given the opportunity to make interventions on behalf of groups of NGOs in plenary meetings, including of the COP. They are also invited to address the high-level segment of the COP. 16. Following the conclusions of SBI 20, NGOs are now able to submit information and views on issues where such views have been requested from Parties. These submissions are posted on the UNFCCC web site but, in order not to expand the volume of documentation, are not issued as official documents. 15. NGOs participate actively in the Convention process. All meetings of the COP and its subsidiary bodies are open to attendance by NGOs, as are contact groups. Representatives of NGOs are often given the opportunity to make interventions on behalf of groups of NGOs in plenary meetings, including of the COP. They are also invited to address the high-level segment of the COP. 16. Following the conclusions of SBI 20, NGOs are now able to submit information and views on issues where such views have been requested from Parties. These submissions are posted on the UNFCCC web site but, in order not to expand the volume of documentation, are not issued as official documents.
FCCC/SBI/2005/5 Submissions and inputs 3. … Submissions from observer organizations have been posted on the UNFCCC web site. 16. Following the conclusions of SBI 20, NGOs are now able to submit information and views on issues where such views have been requested from Parties. These submissions are posted on the UNFCCC web site but, in order not to expand the volume of documentation, are not issued as official documents. 3. … Submissions from observer organizations have been posted on the UNFCCC web site. 16. Following the conclusions of SBI 20, NGOs are now able to submit information and views on issues where such views have been requested from Parties. These submissions are posted on the UNFCCC web site but, in order not to expand the volume of documentation, are not issued as official documents.
FCCC/SBI/2005/5 Workshops participation 15….[Representatives of NGOs are also invited to participate in workshops, albeit in limited numbers. Meetings between NGOs and presiding officers are organized during sessions to exchange views. 30. This recommendation has limited application to the UNFCCC process. However, it may be noted that NGOs are often key actors in national or local climate change strategies. They may also play an important role in organizing and providing inputs to workshops organized by the UNFCCC in host countries. Furthermore, NGOs play a key role in the preparation of national communications in collaboration with government authorities. 15….[Representatives of NGOs are also invited to participate in workshops, albeit in limited numbers. Meetings between NGOs and presiding officers are organized during sessions to exchange views. 30. This recommendation has limited application to the UNFCCC process. However, it may be noted that NGOs are often key actors in national or local climate change strategies. They may also play an important role in organizing and providing inputs to workshops organized by the UNFCCC in host countries. Furthermore, NGOs play a key role in the preparation of national communications in collaboration with government authorities.
FCCC/SBI/2005/5 Constituencies 9. ...[He referred to various proposals, including expanding United Nations consultations with various constituencies and establishing multi-stakeholder partnerships which he agreed would contribute to the United Nations becoming more “outward looking” and to making the deliberations richer, more diverse and grounded in reality.
13. The Secretary-General drew particular attention to the success of constituencies and he encouraged NGOs to organize themselves into broad issue-oriented networks to facilitate consultations.
18. A constituency system based on the self-organization of NGOs into groups and broad networks, as suggested by the Secretary-General, is an established means to facilitate communication with observer
organizations and their participation in the Convention process (see FCCC/SBI/2004/5, para. 20).
19. One such constituency encompasses local governments and municipal authority associations. Local governments, municipal authorities and parliamentarians participate in the Convention process as observer organizations.
9. ...[He referred to various proposals, including expanding United Nations consultations with various constituencies and establishing multi-stakeholder partnerships which he agreed would contribute to the United Nations becoming more “outward looking” and to making the deliberations richer, more diverse and grounded in reality.
13. The Secretary-General drew particular attention to the success of constituencies and he encouraged NGOs to organize themselves into broad issue-oriented networks to facilitate consultations.
18. A constituency system based on the self-organization of NGOs into groups and broad networks, as suggested by the Secretary-General, is an established means to facilitate communication with observer
organizations and their participation in the Convention process (see FCCC/SBI/2004/5, para. 20).
19. One such constituency encompasses local governments and municipal authority associations. Local governments, municipal authorities and parliamentarians participate in the Convention process as observer organizations.
FCCC/SBI/2005/5 Good practices 26. The Secretary-General recommended improvement
s in the United Nations Secretariat’s dialogue with NGOs, including through the use of Internet-based techniques to survey public opinion, to raise awareness and to monitor global commitments. Other suggestions included the establishment of a central database of NGOs, maintaining information on best practices relating to NGOs, and improved access to documents.
26. The Secretary-General recommended improvement
s in the United Nations Secretariat’s dialogue with NGOs, including through the use of Internet-based techniques to survey public opinion, to raise awareness and to monitor global commitments. Other suggestions included the establishment of a central database of NGOs, maintaining information on best practices relating to NGOs, and improved access to documents.
FCCC/SBI/2005/L.4 SG recommendations 16. The SBI took note of the information provided by the secretariat on relevant initiatives in the United Nations focused on enhancing the relationship between the United Nations system and civil society, including the report of the Secretary-General in response to the report by the Panel of Eminent Persons on United Nations–Civil Society Relations. 16. The SBI took note of the information provided by the secretariat on relevant initiatives in the United Nations focused on enhancing the relationship between the United Nations system and civil society, including the report of the Secretary-General in response to the report by the Panel of Eminent Persons on United Nations–Civil Society Relations.
FCCC/SBI/2004/10 Financial support 102. The SBI recognized that NGO participation, although extensive, was not geographically balanced, with fewer NGOs attending from developing countries and EIT countries. The SBI also recognized the importance of a more globally representative participation in sessions and workshops and encouraged interested Parties to support attendance by NGOs from developing countries and EIT countries that lack the necessary resources. 108. The SBI acknowledged the importance of an enhanced participation by indigenous peoples organizations in the Convention process, in particular through discussions on relevant agenda items, participation in workshops and informal contacts. The SBI invited the chairs of relevant Convention bodies and the secretariat to facilitate such participation to the extent possible, without recourse to financial support. 102. The SBI recognized that NGO participation, although extensive, was not geographically balanced, with fewer NGOs attending from developing countries and EIT countries. The SBI also recognized the importance of a more globally representative participation in sessions and workshops and encouraged interested Parties to support attendance by NGOs from developing countries and EIT countries that lack the necessary resources. 108. The SBI acknowledged the importance of an enhanced participation by indigenous peoples organizations in the Convention process, in particular through discussions on relevant agenda items, participation in workshops and informal contacts. The SBI invited the chairs of relevant Convention bodies and the secretariat to facilitate such participation to the extent possible, without recourse to financial support.
FCCC/SBI/2004/10 Interventions 103. The SBI recognized the value of NGO contributions to deliberations on substantive issues. It welcomed the current practices of the President of the COP, the chairs of the subsidiary bodies and the chairs of contact groups in permitting interventions by NGOs when appropriate, while ensuring that the Convention process proceeds in an efficient and effective manner. 103. The SBI recognized the value of NGO contributions to deliberations on substantive issues. It welcomed the current practices of the President of the COP, the chairs of the subsidiary bodies and the chairs of contact groups in permitting interventions by NGOs when appropriate, while ensuring that the Convention process proceeds in an efficient and effective manner.
FCCC/SBI/2004/10 Admission/observer status
100. The SBI took note of the current approach of the secretariat to the admission of observer organizations and views expressed by Parties, and agreed to continue its consideration of the matter in the context of the continued consideration of effective participation. 100. The SBI took note of the current approach of the secretariat to the admission of observer organizations and views expressed by Parties, and agreed to continue its consideration of the matter in the context of the continued consideration of effective participation.
FCCC/SBI/2004/10 Registration 104. The SBI agreed that requests for submission of information and views could be extended to NGOs where appropriate and on the understanding that such submissions would not be issued as official documents, in order not to expand the volume of documentation, but would be made available on the secretariat web site. 104. The SBI agreed that requests for submission of information and views could be extended to NGOs where appropriate and on the understanding that such submissions would not be issued as official documents, in order not to expand the volume of documentation, but would be made available on the secretariat web site.
FCCC/SBI/2004/10 Values of participation 98. The SBI underlined the paramount importance of facilitating effective participation of Parties throughout the Convention process. The SBI also recognized the fundamental value of effective participation by observers, both in the process and in responding to climate change. 98. The SBI underlined the paramount importance of facilitating effective participation of Parties throughout the Convention process. The SBI also recognized the fundamental value of effective participation by observers, both in the process and in responding to climate change.
FCCC/SBI/2004/L.7 Financial support 24. The SBI acknowledged the importance of an enhanced participation by indigenous peoples organizations in the Convention process, in particular through discussions on relevant agenda items, participation in workshops and informal contacts. The SBI invited the chairs of relevant Convention bodies and the secretariat to facilitate such participation to the extent possible, without recourse to financial support. 24. The SBI acknowledged the importance of an enhanced participation by indigenous peoples organizations in the Convention process, in particular through discussions on relevant agenda items, participation in workshops and informal contacts. The SBI invited the chairs of relevant Convention bodies and the secretariat to facilitate such participation to the extent possible, without recourse to financial support.
FCCC/SBI/2004/L.7 Interventions 19. The SBI recognized the value of NGO contributions to deliberations on substantive issues. It welcomed the current practices of the President of the COP, the chairs of the subsidiary bodies and the chairs of contact groups in permitting interventions by NGOs when appropriate, while ensuring that the Convention process proceeds in an efficient and effective manner. 19. The SBI recognized the value of NGO contributions to deliberations on substantive issues. It welcomed the current practices of the President of the COP, the chairs of the subsidiary bodies and the chairs of contact groups in permitting interventions by NGOs when appropriate, while ensuring that the Convention process proceeds in an efficient and effective manner.
FCCC/SBI/2004/L.7 Admission/observer status
16. The SBI took note of the current approach of the secretariat to the admission of observer organizations and views expressed by Parties, and agreed to continue its consideration of the matter in the context of the continued consideration of effective participation. 16. The SBI took note of the current approach of the secretariat to the admission of observer organizations and views expressed by Parties, and agreed to continue its consideration of the matter in the context of the continued consideration of effective participation.
FCCC/SBI/2004/L.7 Registration 18. The SBI recognized that NGO participation, although extensive, was not geographically balanced, with fewer NGOs attending from developing countries and countries with economies in transition. The SBI also recognized the importance of a more globally representative participation in sessions and workshops and encouraged interested Parties to support attendance by NGOs from developing countries and countries with economies in transition that lack the necessary resources. 20. The SBI agreed that requests for submission of information and views could be extended to NGOs where appropriate and on the understanding that such submissions would not be issued as official documents, in order not to expand the volume of documentation, but would be made available on the secretariat web site. 18. The SBI recognized that NGO participation, although extensive, was not geographically balanced, with fewer NGOs attending from developing countries and countries with economies in transition. The SBI also recognized the importance of a more globally representative participation in sessions and workshops and encouraged interested Parties to support attendance by NGOs from developing countries and countries with economies in transition that lack the necessary resources. 20. The SBI agreed that requests for submission of information and views could be extended to NGOs where appropriate and on the understanding that such submissions would not be issued as official documents, in order not to expand the volume of documentation, but would be made available on the secretariat web site.
FCCC/SBI/2004/L.7 Values of participation 14. The SBI underlined the paramount importance of facilitating effective participation of Parties throughout the Convention process. The SBI also recognized the fundamental value of effective participation by observers, both in the process and in responding to climate change. 14. The SBI underlined the paramount importance of facilitating effective participation of Parties throughout the Convention process. The SBI also recognized the fundamental value of effective participation by observers, both in the process and in responding to climate change.
FCCC/SBI/2004/5 Access and Transparency 2. The SBI, at its eighteenth session, requested the secretariat to report to the SBI at its twentieth session on continued efforts by the chairs of the subsidiary bodies, the chairs of limited membership bodies and the secretariat to facilitate effective participation in the Convention process and promote transparency (FCCC/SBI/2003/8, para. 46 (c)). 12. The participation of NGOs is a fundamental element of the Convention process. It helps to bring transparency to the workings of a complex intergovernmental process, facilitates inputs from geographically diverse sources and from a wide spectrum of expertise and perspectives, improves popular understanding of the issues, and promotes accountability to the societies served. The participation of NGOs in the Convention process is both flexible, and active, supporting the global trend towards more informed, participatory and responsible societies. 2. The SBI, at its eighteenth session, requested the secretariat to report to the SBI at its twentieth session on continued efforts by the chairs of the subsidiary bodies, the chairs of limited membership bodies and the secretariat to facilitate effective participation in the Convention process and promote transparency (FCCC/SBI/2003/8, para. 46 (c)). 12. The participation of NGOs is a fundamental element of the Convention process. It helps to bring transparency to the workings of a complex intergovernmental process, facilitates inputs from geographically diverse sources and from a wide spectrum of expertise and perspectives, improves popular understanding of the issues, and promotes accountability to the societies served. The participation of NGOs in the Convention process is both flexible, and active, supporting the global trend towards more informed, participatory and responsible societies.
FCCC/SBI/2004/5 Technical/virtual participation 32. In order to allow a global audience to witness the public part of deliberations of the Board, as well as briefings and discussions with observers, a live transmission via the Internet is arranged for each Board meeting; the transmission is also recorded and is subsequently available as an on-demand web cast. During sessions of the COP and the subsidiary bodies, the Executive Board of the CDM has established the practice of holding a question-and-answer session with Parties and other participants on issues under discussion by the Board. 32. In order to allow a global audience to witness the public part of deliberations of the Board, as well as briefings and discussions with observers, a live transmission via the Internet is arranged for each Board meeting; the transmission is also recorded and is subsequently available as an on-demand web cast. During sessions of the COP and the subsidiary bodies, the Executive Board of the CDM has established the practice of holding a question-and-answer session with Parties and other participants on issues under discussion by the Board.
FCCC/SBI/2004/5 Briefings by presiding officers and ES 26. NGOs regularly organize meetings with Convention body officials, including the President of the COP and the chairs of the subsidiary bodies and contact groups, to discuss matters of concern to their members and to share their views. 26. NGOs regularly organize meetings with Convention body officials, including the President of the COP and the chairs of the subsidiary bodies and contact groups, to discuss matters of concern to their members and to share their views.
FCCC/SBI/2004/5 Interventions 24. A representative group of NGOs is traditionally invited to make statements to the COP under its agenda item “Statements by NGOs”. NGOs have also made interventions during high-level round-table discussions and in meetings of the subsidiary bodies. At COP 9, in response to the interest by Parties to promote effective participation, NGOs were given the opportunity, through the constituencies, to make interventions on two substantive agenda items in the COP plenary.
25. In accordance with decision 18/CP.4, representatives of observer organizations may be invited to attend meetings of open-ended contact groups as observers. This has now become the norm in the Convention process. On occasion, chairs of contact groups have allowed representatives of NGOs to take the floor in the group. NGOs do not, however, participate in negotiation of texts.
24. A representative group of NGOs is traditionally invited to make statements to the COP under its agenda item “Statements by NGOs”. NGOs have also made interventions during high-level round-table discussions and in meetings of the subsidiary bodies. At COP 9, in response to the interest by Parties to promote effective participation, NGOs were given the opportunity, through the constituencies, to make interventions on two substantive agenda items in the COP plenary.
25. In accordance with decision 18/CP.4, representatives of observer organizations may be invited to attend meetings of open-ended contact groups as observers. This has now become the norm in the Convention process. On occasion, chairs of contact groups have allowed representatives of NGOs to take the floor in the group. NGOs do not, however, participate in negotiation of texts.
FCCC/SBI/2004/5 Admission/observer status
3. This note describes the current admission procedures for observer organizations and proposals to further promote effective participation by non-governmental organizations (NGOs). 8. In order to facilitate the implementation of Article 7, paragraph 6, working procedures have had to be developed. Mindful of the Convention, and drawing on general United Nations practice, the secretariat has developed procedures for the admission of IGOs and NGOs as observer organizations.
10. The secretariat wishes to draw to the attention of the SBI a number of issues relating to the procedures for admission of observer organizations. For example: (b) Organizations which have been established by, and report to, governments and carry out government-mandated activities, but which cannot provide evidence of independence from government, are not considered eligible for admission. They are encouraged to participate as part of government delegations;
18. The COP has admitted 619 NGOs as observer organizations. More than 75 per cent of these are based in Annex I Parties. Peaks of admittance of NGOs from Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention occur when the COP holds its session in a developing country. However, these NGOs rarely attend subsequent sessions. Table 1. Options for improving the participation of non-governmental organizations
3. This note describes the current admission procedures for observer organizations and proposals to further promote effective participation by non-governmental organizations (NGOs). 8. In order to facilitate the implementation of Article 7, paragraph 6, working procedures have had to be developed. Mindful of the Convention, and drawing on general United Nations practice, the secretariat has developed procedures for the admission of IGOs and NGOs as observer organizations.
10. The secretariat wishes to draw to the attention of the SBI a number of issues relating to the procedures for admission of observer organizations. For example: (b) Organizations which have been established by, and report to, governments and carry out government-mandated activities, but which cannot provide evidence of independence from government, are not considered eligible for admission. They are encouraged to participate as part of government delegations;
18. The COP has admitted 619 NGOs as observer organizations. More than 75 per cent of these are based in Annex I Parties. Peaks of admittance of NGOs from Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention occur when the COP holds its session in a developing country. However, these NGOs rarely attend subsequent sessions. Table 1. Options for improving the participation of non-governmental organizations
FCCC/SBI/2004/5 Registration 1. The Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI), at its sixteenth session, agreed to add an item entitled “Effective participation in the Convention process” to the agenda of its seventeenth session. (FCCC/SBI/2002/6, para. 5).
25. In accordance with decision 18/CP.4, representatives of observer organizations may be invited to attend meetings of open-ended contact groups as observers. This has now become the norm in theConvention process. On occasion, chairs of contact groups have allowed representatives of NGOs to take the floor in the group. NGOs do not, however, participate in negotiation of texts.
1. The Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI), at its sixteenth session, agreed to add an item entitled “Effective participation in the Convention process” to the agenda of its seventeenth session. (FCCC/SBI/2002/6, para. 5).
25. In accordance with decision 18/CP.4, representatives of observer organizations may be invited to attend meetings of open-ended contact groups as observers. This has now become the norm in theConvention process. On occasion, chairs of contact groups have allowed representatives of NGOs to take the floor in the group. NGOs do not, however, participate in negotiation of texts.
FCCC/SBI/2004/5 Submissions and inputs 21. On the occasions when NGOs have submitted information or views to the subsidiary bodies, the submissions have been made available only on the secretariat web site. In response to concerns by
Parties, this practice has been followed to limit the volume of documentation and the associated costs, and to conserve paper. This has provided an accessible public platform with limited associated costs.
21. On the occasions when NGOs have submitted information or views to the subsidiary bodies, the submissions have been made available only on the secretariat web site. In response to concerns by
Parties, this practice has been followed to limit the volume of documentation and the associated costs, and to conserve paper. This has provided an accessible public platform with limited associated costs.
FCCC/SBI/2004/5 Workshops participation 34. The secretariat has made special efforts to implement the guidance given at SBI 17 concerning NGO participation in workshops. Fourteen workshops, including five pre-sessional workshops, were organized by the secretariat in 2003. The four existing NGO constituencies and the newly constituted research-oriented and independent organizations (RINGOs) were notified of the workshops and the information was made public on the secretariat web site. Each group was invited to inform the secretariat of the potential interest of its members to attend individual workshops. The relevant chairs were informed of their responses and the number of invitations was tailored accordingly. 34. The secretariat has made special efforts to implement the guidance given at SBI 17 concerning NGO participation in workshops. Fourteen workshops, including five pre-sessional workshops, were organized by the secretariat in 2003. The four existing NGO constituencies and the newly constituted research-oriented and independent organizations (RINGOs) were notified of the workshops and the information was made public on the secretariat web site. Each group was invited to inform the secretariat of the potential interest of its members to attend individual workshops. The relevant chairs were informed of their responses and the number of invitations was tailored accordingly.
FCCC/SBI/2004/5 Values of participation 12. The participation of NGOs is a fundamental element of the Convention process. It helps to bring transparency to the workings of a complex intergovernmental process, facilitates inputs from geographically diverse sources and from a wide spectrum of expertise and perspectives, improves popular understanding of the issues, and promotes accountability to the societies served. 12. The participation of NGOs is a fundamental element of the Convention process. It helps to bring transparency to the workings of a complex intergovernmental process, facilitates inputs from geographically diverse sources and from a wide spectrum of expertise and perspectives, improves popular understanding of the issues, and promotes accountability to the societies served.
FCCC/SBI/2004/5 Side Events and Exhibits 27. The side events and exhibits, coordinated by the secretariat, further facilitate interaction
between Parties, NGOs and other observers for the enrichment of the discussions. The secretariat has
recently introduced web-based tools to streamline the application procedures and to create an information resource with an electronic archive of side event presentations and reports.
27. The side events and exhibits, coordinated by the secretariat, further facilitate interaction
between Parties, NGOs and other observers for the enrichment of the discussions. The secretariat has
recently introduced web-based tools to streamline the application procedures and to create an information resource with an electronic archive of side event presentations and reports.
FCCC/SBI/2003/8 Access and Transparency 46. (b) The SBI recognized the participation of observers as a fundamental feature of the Convention process. The SBI welcomed the continuing effort of the chairs of the subsidiary bodies, the
chairs of limited membership bodies and the secretariat to promote participation of observer organizations in intersessional workshops. The SBI agreed that the use of the secretariat web site to
improve the timeliness of information dissemination and the transparency of the process was valuable; (c) The SBI invited the chairs of the subsidiary bodies, the chairs of limited membership
bodies and the secretariat to continue their efforts to facilitate effective participation in the process and promote transparency. The SBI requested the secretariat to report on these efforts at its twentieth session
for its further consideration.
46. (b) The SBI recognized the participation of observers as a fundamental feature of the Convention process. The SBI welcomed the continuing effort of the chairs of the subsidiary bodies, the
chairs of limited membership bodies and the secretariat to promote participation of observer organizations in intersessional workshops. The SBI agreed that the use of the secretariat web site to
improve the timeliness of information dissemination and the transparency of the process was valuable; (c) The SBI invited the chairs of the subsidiary bodies, the chairs of limited membership
bodies and the secretariat to continue their efforts to facilitate effective participation in the process and promote transparency. The SBI requested the secretariat to report on these efforts at its twentieth session
for its further consideration.
FCCC/SBI/2003/8 Registration 52. (m) The SBSTA recognized the importance of taking into account the work of international and intergovernmental organizations and policy processes relevant to the activities of the UNFCCC. 52. (m) The SBSTA recognized the importance of taking into account the work of international and intergovernmental organizations and policy processes relevant to the activities of the UNFCCC.
FCCC/SBI/2003/8 Workshops participation 46. (b) The SBI recognized the participation of observers as a fundamental feature of the Convention process. The SBI welcomed the continuing effort of the chairs of the subsidiary bodies, the chairs of limited membership bodies and the secretariat to promote participation of observer organizations in intersessional workshops 46. (b) The SBI recognized the participation of observers as a fundamental feature of the Convention process. The SBI welcomed the continuing effort of the chairs of the subsidiary bodies, the chairs of limited membership bodies and the secretariat to promote participation of observer organizations in intersessional workshops
FCCC/SBSTA/2002/13 Values of participation 49. (m) The SBSTA recognized the importance of taking into account the work of international and intergovernmental organizations and policy processes relevant to the activities of the UNFCCC. 49. (m) The SBSTA recognized the importance of taking into account the work of international and intergovernmental organizations and policy processes relevant to the activities of the UNFCCC.
FCCC/SBI/2002/17 Access and Transparency 50 (c) The SBI recognized the responsibility of the chairs of the subsidiary bodies in selecting the chairs of workshops and in inviting participants and observers. It requested the chairs of the
subsidiary bodies, workshop chairs and the secretariat to make additional efforts to promote transparency and observer participation, while safeguarding the effectiveness of workshops;
50 (c) The SBI recognized the responsibility of the chairs of the subsidiary bodies in selecting the chairs of workshops and in inviting participants and observers. It requested the chairs of the
subsidiary bodies, workshop chairs and the secretariat to make additional efforts to promote transparency and observer participation, while safeguarding the effectiveness of workshops;
FCCC/SBI/2002/17 Registration 50. (a) The SBI took note of document FCCC/SBI/2002/13 on effective participation in the Convention process, and of views expressed by Parties on the need for ensuring transparency and efficiency, and enhancing participation in that process; 50. (a) The SBI took note of document FCCC/SBI/2002/13 on effective participation in the Convention process, and of views expressed by Parties on the need for ensuring transparency and efficiency, and enhancing participation in that process;
FCCC/SBI/2002/17 Workshops participation 50. (c) The SBI recognized the responsibility of the chairs of the subsidiary bodies in selecting the chairs of workshops and in inviting participants and observers. It requested the chairs of the subsidiary bodies, workshop chairs and the secretariat to make additional efforts to promote transparency and observer participation, while safeguarding the effectiveness of workshops; (e) The SBI requested the secretariat to improve the timeliness of notification and documentation in connection with intersessional workshops, recognizing the constraints in securing funding and the consequent delays in confirming the convening of workshops. In this connection, the SBI also requested the secretariat to publish on its web site the notification and documentation for each workshop or meeting of an expert body, as soon as the workshop or meeting is confirmed and the documentation is available; 50. (c) The SBI recognized the responsibility of the chairs of the subsidiary bodies in selecting the chairs of workshops and in inviting participants and observers. It requested the chairs of the subsidiary bodies, workshop chairs and the secretariat to make additional efforts to promote transparency and observer participation, while safeguarding the effectiveness of workshops; (e) The SBI requested the secretariat to improve the timeliness of notification and documentation in connection with intersessional workshops, recognizing the constraints in securing funding and the consequent delays in confirming the convening of workshops. In this connection, the SBI also requested the secretariat to publish on its web site the notification and documentation for each workshop or meeting of an expert body, as soon as the workshop or meeting is confirmed and the documentation is available;
FCCC/SBI/2002/L.13 Access and Transparency 1. The Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI) took note of document FCCC/SBI/2002/13 on effective participation in the Convention process, and of views expressed by Parties on the need for ensuring transparency and efficiency, and enhancing participation in that process. 1. The Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI) took note of document FCCC/SBI/2002/13 on effective participation in the Convention process, and of views expressed by Parties on the need for ensuring transparency and efficiency, and enhancing participation in that process.
FCCC/SBI/2002/L.13 Registration 2. The SBI noted that consideration of observer participation in the work of the Executive Board of the clean development mechanism had been taken up by the Conference of the Parties at its eighth session, in its discussion of the report of the Executive Board. 2. The SBI noted that consideration of observer participation in the work of the Executive Board of the clean development mechanism had been taken up by the Conference of the Parties at its eighth session, in its discussion of the report of the Executive Board.
FCCC/SBI/2002/L.13 Workshops participation 3. The SBI recognized the responsibility of the chairs of the subsidiary bodies in selecting the chairs of workshops and in inviting participants and observers. It requested the chairs of the subsidiary
bodies, workshop chairs and the secretariat to make additional efforts to promote transparency and observer participation, while safeguarding the effectiveness of workshops.
3. The SBI recognized the responsibility of the chairs of the subsidiary bodies in selecting the chairs of workshops and in inviting participants and observers. It requested the chairs of the subsidiary
bodies, workshop chairs and the secretariat to make additional efforts to promote transparency and observer participation, while safeguarding the effectiveness of workshops.
FCCC/SBI/2002/13 Registration 32. The annex to decision 17/CP.7 states that meetings of the Executive Board “shall be open to attendance, as observers, by all Parties and by all UNFCCC accredited observers and stakeholders, except where otherwise decided by the Executive Board.”12 Detailed information on the facilitation of attendance by observers is contained in the report of the Executive Board of the CDM to the COP at its eighth session.13 32. The annex to decision 17/CP.7 states that meetings of the Executive Board “shall be open to attendance, as observers, by all Parties and by all UNFCCC accredited observers and stakeholders, except where otherwise decided by the Executive Board.”12 Detailed information on the facilitation of attendance by observers is contained in the report of the Executive Board of the CDM to the COP at its eighth session.13
FCCC/SBI/2002/13 Workshops participation A. Intersessional workshops A. Intersessional workshops
FCCC/SBI/2002/Misc.8 Access and Transparency Transparency and efficiency in the process Transparency and efficiency in the process
FCCC/SBI/2002/Misc.8 Registration Broad participation of observers including NGOs in the Convention process is important and should, to the extent possible, be promoted at all times by various means, including timely announcement of meetings. The EU is also open to a discussion with other Parties and NGOs to develop mechanisms to enhance and secure the broadest possible and balanced participation of observers and NGOs, while maintaining the balance between efficiency and transparency Broad participation of observers including NGOs in the Convention process is important and should, to the extent possible, be promoted at all times by various means, including timely announcement of meetings. The EU is also open to a discussion with other Parties and NGOs to develop mechanisms to enhance and secure the broadest possible and balanced participation of observers and NGOs, while maintaining the balance between efficiency and transparency
FCCC/SBI/2002/Misc.8 Workshops participation We recognize, as do the NGOs themselves, that opportunities to participate as observers in these Convention bodies such as expert groups or Convention activities such as workshops necessarily cannot be open-ended. We also recognize that the interest of NGOs in participating as observers is likely to vary from expert group to expert group and from workshop to workshop depending on the issues taken up at a particular moment. We recognize, as do the NGOs themselves, that opportunities to participate as observers in these Convention bodies such as expert groups or Convention activities such as workshops necessarily cannot be open-ended. We also recognize that the interest of NGOs in participating as observers is likely to vary from expert group to expert group and from workshop to workshop depending on the issues taken up at a particular moment.
FCCC/SBI/2002/Misc.8 Values of participation Broad participation of observers including NGOs in the Convention process is important and should, to the extent possible, be promoted at all times by various means, including timely announcement of meetings. At the same time that we all increasingly recognize the critical role played by NGOs in the work of the Convention – NGOs representing the environmental community, the private sector, and others in civil society – it is ironic that we seem to be moving increasingly to restrict their participation in various activities under the Convention Broad participation of observers including NGOs in the Convention process is important and should, to the extent possible, be promoted at all times by various means, including timely announcement of meetings. At the same time that we all increasingly recognize the critical role played by NGOs in the work of the Convention – NGOs representing the environmental community, the private sector, and others in civil society – it is ironic that we seem to be moving increasingly to restrict their participation in various activities under the Convention
FCCC/SBI/2002/Misc.8 Constituencies The second category of concern involves the opportunities afforded to non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to take part as observers not only in meetings of expert groups but also in workshops. We were distressed at the very limited opportunities afforded to NGOs to take part as observers at the recent workshop on Cleaner Energy in Whistler, British Columbia, and at the manner in which those few opportunities were allocated among NGOs. In the case of the private sector, the allocation made clearly favored representatives of companies that are members of the International Chamber of Commerce in Paris – an umbrella organization that is not fully representative of our private sector – yet one which some apparently believe to be a “recognized constituency group”. To our knowledge, there are no “recognized constituency groups” in the Convention, nor have we the Parties ever identified any such groups The second category of concern involves the opportunities afforded to non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to take part as observers not only in meetings of expert groups but also in workshops. We were distressed at the very limited opportunities afforded to NGOs to take part as observers at the recent workshop on Cleaner Energy in Whistler, British Columbia, and at the manner in which those few opportunities were allocated among NGOs. In the case of the private sector, the allocation made clearly favored representatives of companies that are members of the International Chamber of Commerce in Paris – an umbrella organization that is not fully representative of our private sector – yet one which some apparently believe to be a “recognized constituency group”. To our knowledge, there are no “recognized constituency groups” in the Convention, nor have we the Parties ever identified any such groups
FCCC/SBI/2002/6 Registration 5. At its 6th meeting, the SBI agreed to add an item entitled “Effective participation in the Convention process” to the agenda of its seventeenth session. At the same meeting, the representatives of two Parties requested that Parties be provided with an opportunity to submit views on this item for compilation in a miscellaneous document, for consideration by the SBI at its seventeenth session. 5. At its 6th meeting, the SBI agreed to add an item entitled “Effective participation in the Convention process” to the agenda of its seventeenth session. At the same meeting, the representatives of two Parties requested that Parties be provided with an opportunity to submit views on this item for compilation in a miscellaneous document, for consideration by the SBI at its seventeenth session.
FCCC/CP/1998/16/Add.1 Access and Transparency 1.Decides that the presiding officers of Convention bodies may invite representatives of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations to attend as observers any open-ended contact group established under the Convention process, unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session of the Convention body setting up that contact group object, and on the understanding that the presiding officers of such contact groups may determine at any time during their proceedings that they should be closed to intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations;
2. Invites the presiding officers of Convention bodies, at the time of their establishment of such a contact group, to ascertain if there are objections from Parties to attendance by intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations at that contact group under the conditions set out in paragraph 1 above.
1.Decides that the presiding officers of Convention bodies may invite representatives of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations to attend as observers any open-ended contact group established under the Convention process, unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session of the Convention body setting up that contact group object, and on the understanding that the presiding officers of such contact groups may determine at any time during their proceedings that they should be closed to intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations;
2. Invites the presiding officers of Convention bodies, at the time of their establishment of such a contact group, to ascertain if there are objections from Parties to attendance by intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations at that contact group under the conditions set out in paragraph 1 above.
FCCC/SBI/1998/6 Admission/observer status
81. a. The SBI took note that the current arrangements for the accreditation of
non-governmental organizations were satisfactory, and that no change in the accreditation
procedures was required;
81. a. The SBI took note that the current arrangements for the accreditation of
non-governmental organizations were satisfactory, and that no change in the accreditation
procedures was required;
FCCC/SBI/1998/6 Registration 81.d. The SBI noted that representatives of non-governmental organizations (NGO) may be allowed to participate in informal contact groups, unless the Parties object. 81.d. The SBI noted that representatives of non-governmental organizations (NGO) may be allowed to participate in informal contact groups, unless the Parties object.
FCCC/SBI/1998/6 Workshops participation 81.d. The SBI noted that representatives of non-governmental organizations (NGO) may be allowed to participate in informal contact groups, unless the Parties object. 83. The SBI requested the secretariat to prepare, for consideration at its ninth session, a draft decision on the modalities for participation of representatives of NGOs in contact groups for a decision by the COP at its fourth session. 81.d. The SBI noted that representatives of non-governmental organizations (NGO) may be allowed to participate in informal contact groups, unless the Parties object. 83. The SBI requested the secretariat to prepare, for consideration at its ninth session, a draft decision on the modalities for participation of representatives of NGOs in contact groups for a decision by the COP at its fourth session.
FCCC/SBI/1998/6 Constituencies 81.b. The SBI noted that the existing three recognized constituencies: (i) environmental, (ii) business and industry, and (iii) local authorities, did not always provide a practical way of grouping the non-governmental organizations. The SBI concluded that a new framework could be based on elements provided by the Executive Secretary in document FCCC/SBI/1997/14/Add.1, paragraphs 5 and 6, as well as on the list of major groups in Agenda 21. In this regard, the SBI requested the secretariat to continue consultations with representatives of different non-governmental organizations to arrive at an improved set of constituencies, possibly to be confirmed by the SBI at its tenth session; 81.b. The SBI noted that the existing three recognized constituencies: (i) environmental, (ii) business and industry, and (iii) local authorities, did not always provide a practical way of grouping the non-governmental organizations. The SBI concluded that a new framework could be based on elements provided by the Executive Secretary in document FCCC/SBI/1997/14/Add.1, paragraphs 5 and 6, as well as on the list of major groups in Agenda 21. In this regard, the SBI requested the secretariat to continue consultations with representatives of different non-governmental organizations to arrive at an improved set of constituencies, possibly to be confirmed by the SBI at its tenth session;
FCCC/SBI/1998/5 Financial support Annex. Financial support or payment of fees Annex. Financial support or payment of fees
FCCC/SBI/1998/5 Admission/observer status
Annex. Accreditation criteria Annex. Accreditation criteria
FCCC/SBI/1998/CRP.3 Workshops participation 3. b. The SBI noted that representatives of recognized non-governmental organization (NGO) constituencies may be allowed to participate in informal contact groups, if the chairmen of those groups agree. The SBI recognized that such groups would need to keep their intergovernmental nature and that NGO participants could be asked to leave during certain phases of the discussions; 3. b. The SBI noted that representatives of recognized non-governmental organization (NGO) constituencies may be allowed to participate in informal contact groups, if the chairmen of those groups agree. The SBI recognized that such groups would need to keep their intergovernmental nature and that NGO participants could be asked to leave during certain phases of the discussions;
FCCC/CP/1998/L.1 Workshops participation 1.Decides that representatives of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations (IGOs and NGOs) may be invited to participate as observers in any open-ended contact group established under the Convention process, unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session of the Convention body setting up that contact group object and on the understanding that the presiding officers of such contact groups may determine at any time during their proceedings that they should be closed to IGOs and NGOs; 1.Decides that representatives of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations (IGOs and NGOs) may be invited to participate as observers in any open-ended contact group established under the Convention process, unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session of the Convention body setting up that contact group object and on the understanding that the presiding officers of such contact groups may determine at any time during their proceedings that they should be closed to IGOs and NGOs;
FCCC/SBI/1997/14/Add.1 Admission/observer status
3. According to these, the secretariat seeks to establish that organizations to be accredited have activities of relevance to the Convention and are classed as "not-for-profit" (tax exempt) under the laws of
their country of origin.
3. According to these, the secretariat seeks to establish that organizations to be accredited have activities of relevance to the Convention and are classed as "not-for-profit" (tax exempt) under the laws of
their country of origin.
FCCC/SBI/1997/14/Add.1 Constituencies 5. An important tool in the management of NGO participation, also dating back to INC I, has been the recognition of "constituencies" of NGOs. Initially, there were two constituencies: business and industry being one and the environmental NGOs the other. Since then, a third group has gained recognition: local government and municipal authorities. 5. An important tool in the management of NGO participation, also dating back to INC I, has been the recognition of "constituencies" of NGOs. Initially, there were two constituencies: business and industry being one and the environmental NGOs the other. Since then, a third group has gained recognition: local government and municipal authorities.
FCCC/SBI/1997/14 Constituencies 14. Subsequently, the Chairman of the SBSTA, with the concurrence of that body, has decided that the three NGO constituencies mentioned in paragraph 5 above can have a seat with a nameplate, on the floor of that body, and has allowed interventions on specific point of its agenda. 14. Subsequently, the Chairman of the SBSTA, with the concurrence of that body, has decided that the three NGO constituencies mentioned in paragraph 5 above can have a seat with a nameplate, on the floor of that body, and has allowed interventions on specific point of its agenda.
FCCC/SBI/1997/Misc.6 Financial support The existing mechanisms and processes for NGO consultation/participation between the UNFCCC and NGOs may be grouped as follows: … The existing mechanisms and processes for NGO consultation/participation between the UNFCCC and NGOs may be grouped as follows: …
FCCC/SBI/1997/Misc.6 Interventions NGOs are given a right of intervention in the form of group statements. Thesestatements are generally permitted at the end of plenary sessions, of approximately 5 minutes'duration each. NGOs are given a right of intervention in the form of group statements. Thesestatements are generally permitted at the end of plenary sessions, of approximately 5 minutes'duration each.
FCCC/SBI/1997/Misc.6 Workshops participation Access to Workshops and other Meetings, There are a number of workshops organised alongside the formal meetings of the UNFCCC bodies which are organized by NGOs and the secretariat among other organizations. … Access to Workshops and other Meetings, There are a number of workshops organised alongside the formal meetings of the UNFCCC bodies which are organized by NGOs and the secretariat among other organizations. …
FCCC/SBI/1997/Misc.6 Constituencies Other constituencies Other constituencies
FCCC/SBI/1997/Misc.7 Submissions and inputs 2. … In view of the nature of the agenda item under discussion, the secretariat deemed it necessary to include the four submissions* from thenon-governmental community. 2. … In view of the nature of the agenda item under discussion, the secretariat deemed it necessary to include the four submissions* from thenon-governmental community.
FCCC/SBI/1997/21 Registration 33. At the same meeting, the SBI, on the proposal of its Vice-Chairman, took note of document FCCC/SBI/1997/MISC.7 and, taking account of views expressed at its seventh session, decided to consider this issue at its eighth session. It further requested the secretariat to advise the SBI on the elements in other United Nation procedures which could be relevant to the FCCC/SBI/1997/21 English Page 13 development of procedures on the participation of non-governmental organizations in the Convention process. 33. At the same meeting, the SBI, on the proposal of its Vice-Chairman, took note of document FCCC/SBI/1997/MISC.7 and, taking account of views expressed at its seventh session, decided to consider this issue at its eighth session. It further requested the secretariat to advise the SBI on the elements in other United Nation procedures which could be relevant to the FCCC/SBI/1997/21 English Page 13 development of procedures on the participation of non-governmental organizations in the Convention process.
FCCC/SBI/1997/6 Technical/virtual participation 7. New initiatives for cooperative implementation, including technology transfer and diffusion, between all Parties to the Convention and with the major groups in civil society are also being explored by the Parties to the Convention. Through these linkages the key themes of Agenda 21 pertaining to integrated policy development, citizen participation in decisionmaking, institutional and human capacity building and global partnerships involving many stakeholders, are being addressed by the UNFCCC. 7. New initiatives for cooperative implementation, including technology transfer and diffusion, between all Parties to the Convention and with the major groups in civil society are also being explored by the Parties to the Convention. Through these linkages the key themes of Agenda 21 pertaining to integrated policy development, citizen participation in decisionmaking, institutional and human capacity building and global partnerships involving many stakeholders, are being addressed by the UNFCCC.
FCCC/SBI/1997/4 Submissions and inputs VI. Mechanisms for consultation with NGO VI. Mechanisms for consultation with NGO
FCCC/SBSTA/1996/13 Workshops participation (c) The SBSTA welcomed the contributions made at the workshop on consultative mechanisms for non-governmental organization inputs to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change held on 2 March 1996. Since consensus on mechanisms for consultation had not yet been reached by non-governmental organizations participating in the workshop, the SBSTA proposed that for the time being emphasis should be given to improving existing consultative processes; (d) The SBSTA therefore proposed that as a next step the secretariat should explore further with non-governmental groups current mechanisms and procedures for consultation with a view to establishing how they might be made more efficient. The suggestion was made in this regard that it would be helpful also to examine the initiatives that the IPCC is taking to obtain access to a wider range of expertise in the technological areas. On the basis of these discussions, a paper could be prepared for consideration by the SBSTA at its fourth session with the aim of reaching a conclusive decision on the creation of a consultative mechanism. (c) The SBSTA welcomed the contributions made at the workshop on consultative mechanisms for non-governmental organization inputs to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change held on 2 March 1996. Since consensus on mechanisms for consultation had not yet been reached by non-governmental organizations participating in the workshop, the SBSTA proposed that for the time being emphasis should be given to improving existing consultative processes; (d) The SBSTA therefore proposed that as a next step the secretariat should explore further with non-governmental groups current mechanisms and procedures for consultation with a view to establishing how they might be made more efficient. The suggestion was made in this regard that it would be helpful also to examine the initiatives that the IPCC is taking to obtain access to a wider range of expertise in the technological areas. On the basis of these discussions, a paper could be prepared for consideration by the SBSTA at its fourth session with the aim of reaching a conclusive decision on the creation of a consultative mechanism.
FCCC/SBSTA/1996/11 Financial support 4. Second, to ensure equitable participation in any process, it is also essential that adequate funding be provided to facilitate the sustained participation of NGO representatives from developing countries 4. Second, to ensure equitable participation in any process, it is also essential that adequate funding be provided to facilitate the sustained participation of NGO representatives from developing countries
FCCC/SBSTA/1996/11 Interventions 16. NGOs should be given much freer license to intervene from the floor. 16. NGOs should be given much freer license to intervene from the floor.
FCCC/SBSTA/1996/11 Registration 18. In the negotiating bodies of the Convention it should be standard practice for the Secretariat to solicit views of NGOs on specific agenda items. T 18. In the negotiating bodies of the Convention it should be standard practice for the Secretariat to solicit views of NGOs on specific agenda items. T
FCCC/SBSTA/1996/Misc.2 Submissions and inputs Workshop on consultative mechanisms for the NGO inputs to the UNFCCC Workshop on consultative mechanisms for the NGO inputs to the UNFCCC
FCCC/CP/1996/2 Access and Transparency V. OBSERVERS Rule 6, 1. The United Nations, its specialized agencies, any international entity or entities entrusted by the Conference of the Parties pursuant to Article 11 of the Convention with the operation of the financial mechanism, and the International Atomic Energy Agency, as well as any State member thereof or observers thereto not Party to the Convention, may be represented at sessions of the Conference of the Parties as observers. 2. Such observers may, upon invitation of the President, participate without the right to vote in the proceedings of any session, unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session object.
Rule 7, 1. Any body or agency, whether national or international, governmental or non-governmental, which is qualified in matters covered by the Convention and which has informed the secretariat of its wish to be represented at a session of the Conference of the Parties as an observer may be so admitted unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session object. 2. Such observers may, upon invitation of the President, participate without the right to vote in the proceedings of any session in matters of direct concern to the body or agency they represent, unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session object.
V. OBSERVERS Rule 6, 1. The United Nations, its specialized agencies, any international entity or entities entrusted by the Conference of the Parties pursuant to Article 11 of the Convention with the operation of the financial mechanism, and the International Atomic Energy Agency, as well as any State member thereof or observers thereto not Party to the Convention, may be represented at sessions of the Conference of the Parties as observers. 2. Such observers may, upon invitation of the President, participate without the right to vote in the proceedings of any session, unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session object.
Rule 7, 1. Any body or agency, whether national or international, governmental or non-governmental, which is qualified in matters covered by the Convention and which has informed the secretariat of its wish to be represented at a session of the Conference of the Parties as an observer may be so admitted unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session object. 2. Such observers may, upon invitation of the President, participate without the right to vote in the proceedings of any session in matters of direct concern to the body or agency they represent, unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session object.
FCCC/CP/1996/2 Registration Rule 8 The secretariat shall notify those entitled to be observers pursuant to Rules 6 and 7 above of the date and venue of any session scheduled by the Conference of the Parties so that
they may be represented by observers.
Rule 8 The secretariat shall notify those entitled to be observers pursuant to Rules 6 and 7 above of the date and venue of any session scheduled by the Conference of the Parties so that
they may be represented by observers.
FCCC/CP/1995/7 Admission/observer status
22. At its 3rd plenary meeting, on 3 April, the Conference, on the proposal of the President, agreed that the secretariat should invite to the future sessions of the Conference and of its subsidiary bodies all intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations admitted at the present session and at future sessions, unless an objection was raised to any particular organization in accordance with the Convention and the rules of procedure. Consequently, all the organizations admitted at the present session would be invited to the second and subsequent sessions, and the procedure for admission to the second session would apply only to new applicants. 22. At its 3rd plenary meeting, on 3 April, the Conference, on the proposal of the President, agreed that the secretariat should invite to the future sessions of the Conference and of its subsidiary bodies all intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations admitted at the present session and at future sessions, unless an objection was raised to any particular organization in accordance with the Convention and the rules of procedure. Consequently, all the organizations admitted at the present session would be invited to the second and subsequent sessions, and the procedure for admission to the second session would apply only to new applicants.
FCCC/CP/1995/7/Add.1 Access and Transparency 1 (d) the summary of the review report should be distributed by the secretariat to all Parties and accredited observers to the Conference of the Parties; copies of the full review report will be available on request; 1 (d) the summary of the review report should be distributed by the secretariat to all Parties and accredited observers to the Conference of the Parties; copies of the full review report will be available on request;
FCCC/CP/1995/2 Access and Transparency 1. That footnote reads as follows: ‘Paragraph 106 (c) of the Report of the Committee on its eighth session (A/AC.237/41) states: "Consistent with the Rules of Procedure of the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal, upon which the draft rules were largely based, Rule 30 of the draft rules of procedure would be interpreted as permitting duly accredited observers to participate in ‘private’ meetings."’ 1. That footnote reads as follows: ‘Paragraph 106 (c) of the Report of the Committee on its eighth session (A/AC.237/41) states: "Consistent with the Rules of Procedure of the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal, upon which the draft rules were largely based, Rule 30 of the draft rules of procedure would be interpreted as permitting duly accredited observers to participate in ‘private’ meetings."’
FCCC/SBSTA/1995/3 Inputs for background documents 41. Having considered a text proposed by the Chairman (FCCC/SBSTA/1995/L.2), the SBSTA adopted the following conclusion: (a) SBSTA requested the secretariat to organize a workshop on non-governmental inputs, as foreseen in the work programme of the SBSTA, in cooperation with interested Parties and organizations. Such a workshop could possibly be held during the weekend preceding the next meeting of the SBSTA. Adequate participation, including that of FCCC/SBSTA/1995/3 non-governmental organizations from developing countries, would have to be promoted and
assistance provided. The conclusions of the workshop would be made available to the SBSTA for consideration at its second session. The workshop would have to be funded from extrabudgetary resources. In this context, the SBSTA noted with appreciation the support offered by two Parties. The views expressed by Parties would be taken into account in preparing for the workshop.
41. Having considered a text proposed by the Chairman (FCCC/SBSTA/1995/L.2), the SBSTA adopted the following conclusion: (a) SBSTA requested the secretariat to organize a workshop on non-governmental inputs, as foreseen in the work programme of the SBSTA, in cooperation with interested Parties and organizations. Such a workshop could possibly be held during the weekend preceding the next meeting of the SBSTA. Adequate participation, including that of FCCC/SBSTA/1995/3 non-governmental organizations from developing countries, would have to be promoted and
assistance provided. The conclusions of the workshop would be made available to the SBSTA for consideration at its second session. The workshop would have to be funded from extrabudgetary resources. In this context, the SBSTA noted with appreciation the support offered by two Parties. The views expressed by Parties would be taken into account in preparing for the workshop.
FCCC/SBSTA/1995/L.2 Submissions and inputs 16. SBSTA requested the secretariat to organize a workshop on NGO inputs, as foreseenin the work programme of the SBSTA, in cooperation with interested Parties andorganisations. Such workshop could possibly be held in the weekend preceding the nextmeeting of the SBSTA. Adequate participation, inter alia, from NGOs from developingcountries, would have to be promoted. 16. SBSTA requested the secretariat to organize a workshop on NGO inputs, as foreseenin the work programme of the SBSTA, in cooperation with interested Parties andorganisations. Such workshop could possibly be held in the weekend preceding the nextmeeting of the SBSTA. Adequate participation, inter alia, from NGOs from developingcountries, would have to be promoted.
Convention text Admission/observer status
Article 7, paragraph 6: The United Nations, its specialized agencies and the International Atomic Energy Agency, as well as any State member thereof or observers thereto not Party to the Convention, may be represented at sessions of the Conference of the Parties as observers. Anybody or agency, whether national or international, governmental or non-governmental, which is qualified in matters covered by the Convention, and which has informed the secretariat of its wish to be represented at a session of the Conference of the Parties as an observer, may be so admitted unless at least one third of the Parties present object. The admission and participation of observers shall be subject to the rules of procedure adopted by the Conference of the Parties. Article 7, paragraph 6: The United Nations, its specialized agencies and the International Atomic Energy Agency, as well as any State member thereof or observers thereto not Party to the Convention, may be represented at sessions of the Conference of the Parties as observers. Anybody or agency, whether national or international, governmental or non-governmental, which is qualified in matters covered by the Convention, and which has informed the secretariat of its wish to be represented at a session of the Conference of the Parties as an observer, may be so admitted unless at least one third of the Parties present object. The admission and participation of observers shall be subject to the rules of procedure adopted by the Conference of the Parties.
Draft rules of procedure b Access and Transparency V. OBSERVERS Rule 6, 1. The United Nations, its specialized agencies, any international entity or entities entrusted by the Conference of the Parties pursuant to Article 11 of the Convention with the operation of the financial mechanism, and the International Atomic Energy Agency, as well as any State member thereof or observers thereto not Party to the Convention, may be represented at sessions of the Conference of the Parties as observers. 2. Such observers may, upon invitation of the President, participate without the right to vote in the proceedings of any session, unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session object.
Rule 7, 1. Any body or agency, whether national or international, governmental or non-governmental, which is qualified in matters covered by the Convention and which has informed the secretariat of its wish to be represented at a session of the Conference of the Parties as an observer may be so admitted unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session object. 2. Such observers may, upon invitation of the President, participate without the right to vote in the proceedings of any session in matters of direct concern to the body or agency they represent, unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session object.
V. OBSERVERS Rule 6, 1. The United Nations, its specialized agencies, any international entity or entities entrusted by the Conference of the Parties pursuant to Article 11 of the Convention with the operation of the financial mechanism, and the International Atomic Energy Agency, as well as any State member thereof or observers thereto not Party to the Convention, may be represented at sessions of the Conference of the Parties as observers. 2. Such observers may, upon invitation of the President, participate without the right to vote in the proceedings of any session, unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session object.
Rule 7, 1. Any body or agency, whether national or international, governmental or non-governmental, which is qualified in matters covered by the Convention and which has informed the secretariat of its wish to be represented at a session of the Conference of the Parties as an observer may be so admitted unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session object. 2. Such observers may, upon invitation of the President, participate without the right to vote in the proceedings of any session in matters of direct concern to the body or agency they represent, unless at least one third of the Parties present at the session object.
Draft rules of procedure b Registration Rule 8 The secretariat shall notify those entitled to be observers pursuant to Rules 6 and 7 above of the date and venue of any session scheduled by the Conference of the Parties so that they may be represented by observers. Rule 8 The secretariat shall notify those entitled to be observers pursuant to Rules 6 and 7 above of the date and venue of any session scheduled by the Conference of the Parties so that they may be represented by observers.
 Guidelines for participation  Code of Conduct  Guidelines for the participation of representatives of non-governmental organizations at meetings of the bodies of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change  Guidelines for the participation of representatives of non-governmental organizations at meetings of the bodies of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
 Guidelines for participation  Publicity stunts  Guidelines for the participation of representatives of non-governmental organizations at meetings of the bodies of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change  Guidelines for the participation of representatives of non-governmental organizations at meetings of the bodies of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change