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ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTED JOINTLY(AIJ)
 

USIJI Uniform Reporting Document:

Activities Implemented Jointly Under the Pilot Phase

List of Projects

A. Description of the AIJ project

1. Title of project: Solar-Based Rural Electrification in Honduras

2. Host country: Honduras

3. Brief project description:

The Solar-Based Rural Electrification project will provide solar-based electrification to between 2,000 and 5,000 rural Honduran households not served by the electrical grid system. This technology will replace kerosene lamps with photovoltaic (PV)-powered electric lights and, thus, eliminate carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from kerosene combustion. In addition, charging batteries with stand-alone PV modules will displace the practice of charging batteries on grid electricity.

4. Participants:

Name of Organization or Individual Country

Cooperativa Marcalina de Cafetaleros (COMARCA)

Honduras

Asociación Hondurena par el Desarrollo de la Juventud y Mujer Rural (AHDEJUMUR)

Honduras

Asociación Hondurena de Desarrollo (AHDE)

Honduras

La Asociación para el Desarrollo de La Energía Solar-Honduras (ADESOL-Honduras)

Honduras

Enersol Associates, Inc.

U.S.A.

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Cooperativa Marcalina de Cafetaleros

Name of organization (English)

No information is available.

Acronym (original language)

COMARCA

Acronym (English)

None

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project development

Street

Barrio La Tejera

City

Marcala

State

La Paz

Post code

Country

Honduras

Telephone

504-98-1314/504-98-1738

Fax

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Sr. Bonilla

First name, middle name

Adan

Job title

President

Direct telephone

504-98-1314/504-98-1738

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

Solis

First name, middle name

Diana

Job title

International Program Coordinator

Direct telephone

504-39-0383

Direct fax

504-39-5691

Direct e-mail

diana%adesol@sdnhon.org.hn

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Asociación Hondurena par el Desarrollo de la Juventud y Mujer Rural

Name of organization (English)

No information is available.

Acronym (original language)

AHDEJUMUR

Acronym (English)

None

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project Development

Street

Barrio La Fuente, Edificio Lazaries, Apto. #2, 2ndo nivel, Apartado Postal #209

City

Tegucigalpa

State

Post code

Country

Honduras

Telephone

504-37-4913

Fax

504-22-3880

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Garcia

First name, middle name

Santos Tomasa

Job title

Executive Director

Direct telephone

504-37-4913

Direct fax

504-22-3880

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

Solis

First name, middle name

Diana

Job title

International Program Coordinator

Direct telephone

504-39-0383

Direct fax

504-39-5691

Direct e-mail

diana%adesol@sdnhon.org.hn

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Asociación Hondurena de Desarrollo

Name of organization (English)

No information is available.

Acronym (original language)

AHDE

Acronym (English)

None

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project Development

Street

Apartado Postal 2395

City

Tegucigalpa

State

Post code

Country

Honduras

Telephone

504-32-2350

Fax

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Pizzati

First name, middle name

Rene E.

Job title

Executive President

Direct telephone

504-32-2350

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

Solis

First name, middle name

Diana

Job title

International Program Coordinator

Direct telephone

504-39-0383

Direct fax

504-39-5691

Direct e-mail

diana%adesol@sdnhon.org.hn

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

La Asociación para el Desarrollo de La Energía Solar-Honduras

Name of organization (English)

No information is available.

Acronym (original language)

ADESOL-Honduras

Acronym (English)

None

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project Development

Street

Apartado Postal 216

City

Tegucigalpa

State

Post code

Country

Honduras

Telephone

504-39-0383

Fax

504-39-5691

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Solis

First name, middle name

Diana

Job title

Executive Director

Direct telephone

504-39-0383

Direct fax

504-39-5691

Direct e-mail

diana%adesol@sdnhon.org.hn

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Enersol Associates, Inc.

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

None

Acronym (English)

None

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project development, project administration

Street

55 Middlesex Street, Suite 221

City

Chelmsford

State

Massachusetts

Post code

01863

Country

U.S.A.

Telephone

508-251-1828

Fax

508-251-5291

E-mail

enersol@igc.apc.org

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Hansen

First name, middle name

Richard D.

Job title

Director

Direct telephone

978-251-1829

Direct fax

978-251-5291

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

Smith

First name, middle name

Julie

Job title

Program Coordinator

Direct telephone

978-251-1829

Direct fax

978-251-5291

Direct e-mail

5. Description of AIJ project activities

Item
Type of Project

Sector(s)

Energy

Primary activity(ies)

Alternative energy generation (solar)

Project Location

Country

Honduras

Exact location (city, state, region)

Rural regions nationwide

Key Dates and Current Stage of Project

Project starting date (month/year)

September 1997

Project ending date (month/year)

August 2021

Project lifetime (years)

24

Current stage of project

Mutually agreed

General Project Description and Technical Data

The Solar-Based Rural Electrification Project replaces kerosene lamps with PV-powered electric lights in homes in rural regions that do not have electricity service. The project is based on a model developed by Enersol Associates, Inc. and successfully field tested in the Dominican Republic. The project has two components: the establishment of local solar-electric service enterprises and the establishment of end-user credit programs.

Training and technical assistance will be provided to Honduran individuals to help them set up solar-electric supply micro-enterprises, making the technology an available and sustainable option for rural Hondurans. The technicians/entrepreneurs will combine imported components from the United States with locally manufactured components, assemble them into solar-electric systems, then sell, install, and maintain the systems in rural communities. The development of local consumer credit mechanisms, managed by the Honduran NGO partners, will provide end-users with financing in the form of one- to three-year loans, making the systems affordable.

The total number of PV systems that will be installed will depend on the final level of funding, but is anticipated to be between 2,000 and 5,000. PV systems have an estimated service life of 20 years, so project benefits accrue through the year 2019.

6. Cost

(a) Explanation of methodology for calculating cost data

Methodology for Calculating Cost Data

This information is not yet available.

(b) Cost data–Project development

This information is not yet available.

(c) Cost data–Project implementation

Information on the total project implementation costs is not yet available. The proposal does indicate that the monitoring and verification component of the project will cost approximately $110,000 over the project lifetime.

Itemized Project Implementation Costs Image

7. Monitoring and verification of AIJ project activities and results

Item

Party(ies) that will be monitoring project activities

The installer (not yet identified), financing NGO (not yet identified), & Enersol

Party(ies) that will be externally verifying project results

This information is not yet available.

Date when the monitoring plan became (or will become) operational (month/year)

This information is not yet available.

Types of data that will be collected

Number of PV systems installed, amount of kerosene previously burned, and PV system’s electrical capacity

Description of Monitoring and Verification Activities and Schedule for Implementation

Enersol has a detailed monitoring plan for both the technical and the financial aspects of the project. All participants agree to external verification of the project's GHG emissions reductions by a third party.

Three parties will be responsible for monitoring activities: the installer, the NGO financing entity, and Enersol. The primary data to be collected are the number of photovoltaic (PV) systems installed as a result of the project, which is assumed to correlate with a known number of gallons of kerosene avoided. For each system installed, figures will be collected for the amount of kerosene previously burned by the participant and the PV system's electrical capacity.

B. Governmental approval

Item

Please check one of the following.

This report is a first report.

or

This report is an intermediate report.

or

This report is a final report.

Please check one of the following:

This report is a joint report. Letter(s) of approval of this report from the designated national authority of the other Party(ies) involved in the activity is(are) attached in Section J, Annex.

or

This report is a separate report.

Additional comments (if any):

C. Compatibility with, and supportiveness of, national economic development and socioeconomic and environmental priorities and strategies

Compatibility with Economic Development and Socioeconomic and Environmental Priorities

The project is compatible with the Honduran objective of meeting its national energy needs, adopting renewable technologies, and providing employment opportunities in rural areas. This project will bring electrification at low cost to many poor rural households, helping Honduras accomplish an important development goal.

D. Environmental, social/cultural, and economic impacts of the AIJ project

Non-Greenhouse-Gas Environmental Impacts of the Project

Through the adoption of stand-alone photovoltaic technology, the project will generate a number of non-GHG benefits. The switch away from kerosene will help reduce health and safety problems associated with the indoor combustion of kerosene. The project will also reduce the use of dry cell batteries and hence improper disposal of such batteries containing heavy metal toxins, which can lead to contamination of soils and water sources.

Stand-alone photovoltaic systems often require little or no land. Typically they are installed on rooftops, though even when ground-mounted, the modules take up a minimal amount of space. The PV systems therefore avoid the environmentally disruptive land-use requirements associated with other methods of electricity supply.

Social/Cultural Impacts of the Project

Solar-based rural electrification improves the quality of rural life because it improves residential lighting by providing the means for households to replace traditional lighting sources, kerosene and candles, with electric lights. In addition to improving household lighting, as a result of the project, solar electric systems may be used in rural Honduran schools, health clinics, small businesses, and community centers.

Economic Impacts of the Project

The project will provide job opportunities for Honduran citizens to work as technicians, entrepreneurs, and loan officers.

E. Greenhouse gas impacts of the AIJ project

1. Scenario description

Item
Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

1 of 1

Site name/designation

Rural regions nationwide

Project sector

Energy

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

Use of kerosene lamps for lighting, and car batteries for various appliances.

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

Well over two million residents of rural Honduras in more than 390,000 households live without electricity, and the state-run electric utility is overwhelmed trying to meet its current demand. Presently, a majority of these households depend on kerosene lamps for lighting and grid-charging of car batteries for various electrical appliances. The combustion of kerosene in lamps results in emissions of CO2. In addition, the grid-charging of car batteries produces CO2 emissions associated with the grid-generated electricity and battery disposal often results in contamination of soils and water. In the absence of the project, rural household dependence on kerosene lamps for lighting and car batteries for electricity is expected to continue indefinitely.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

Alternative energy generation (solar)

Description:

The project will employ specific measures to make solar electric technology known, available, and affordable, and thereby result in the replacement of kerosene lamps in rural Honduran households with solar-powered electric lights. The measures include: active demonstrations of the PV systems as a practical and positive alternative to kerosene lamps and grid-charged batteries; training local PV system installation and maintenance technicians and assisting them to establish viable micro-enterprises that sell, install, and maintain the PV systems; and training and assisting staff from local NGOs in the development, promotion, and implementation of credit programs for PV system purchase.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

2. GHG emission/sequestration calculation methodology

GHG Emission/Sequestration Calculation Methodology

Site number

1 of 1

Project sector

Energy

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Reference Scenario

The reference scenario is based on emissions that would occur from the combustion of kerosene in lamps of participating households. Based on the existing energy supply mix of the Honduran electric grid, which currently includes a major contribution from hydroelectric power, the displaced grid-charged battery related emissions are insignificant compared to those associated with the kerosene lamps, and therefore, are not included in the calculations.

It is anticipated that between 2,000 and 5,000 photovoltaic systems will be installed over a 5-year period beginning in September 1997. For calculation purposes, the developer has assumed that the average of these two estimates, 3,500 photovoltaic systems, will be installed. Thus, reference scenario emissions in any given year are calculated by multiplying the number of currently participating households by the estimated annual emissions per household. The average annual installation rate of photovoltaic systems over the 5-year enrollment period is estimated by dividing 3,500 (i.e., the total number of targeted households) by 5 years, which equals 700 installations per year. The actual installation rate will vary.

Based on a study of household energy use patterns in Honduras conducted by the Biomass Technology Group at the University of Twente, Netherlands (1993), it is estimated that a typical household in Honduras burns 24 gallons of kerosene for lighting annually. Approximately 0.00279 t C are emitted per gallon of kerosene burned. This results in 0.0670 t C emitted from kerosene burned for lighting per rural household per year (= 24 gal/household * 0.00279 t C/gal). Annual per-household carbon emissions are converted to CO2 on a full molecular weight basis by multiplying 0.0670 t C by the ratio of 44 t CO2 / 12 t C (=.2457 t CO2). Thus, reference scenario emissions for the first 5 years of the project are calculated as follows:

Year 1 (1997) (700 * 1) * .2457 t CO2

Year 2 (1998) (700 * 2) * .2457 t CO2

Year 3 (1999) (700 * 3) * .2457 t CO2

Year 4 (2000) (700 * 4) * .2457 t CO2

Year 5 (2001) (700 * 5) * .2457 t CO2

Between 2001 and 2016, the reference scenario emissions remain constant at 860 t CO2 (= 3,500 * 0.2457 t CO2), because all 3,500 targeted households are using photovoltaic systems. Because benefits are not being claimed beyond the estimated service life of each system, 700 participating households are removed from the calculations each year between 2017 and 2020. Thus, the reference scenario emissions decrease between 2017 and 2020, and fall to zero in 2021.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Project Scenario

There are no GHG emissions associated with the photovoltaic systems, therefore the project scenario emissions are equal to zero. The project scenario emissions remain constant throughout the life of the project.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Actual Project

This information is not yet available.

3. GHG emission/sequestration data

(a) Reporting of GHG emissions/sequestration

Image

(b) Additional information on GHG emissions/sequestration

Indirect or Secondary GHG Impacts (Positive and Negative)

This information is not yet available.

Factors That Could Cause the Future Loss or Reversal of GHG Benefits

Given the nature of this project¾ substitution of fossil fuel generated power with solar power¾ loss or reversal of benefits that have been achieved is not possible. Projected emission reductions could be lost if participants switch from using solar-powered electric lights back to kerosene lamps. In addition, an extension of the electrical grid into solar-electrified rural areas could entice some of the system owners onto the grid.

Strategy for Reducing the Risk of Future Loss or Reversal of GHG Benefits

The training component of the project puts in place the human infrastructure needed to ensure the durability of the technology switch. The project's focus on training local individuals ensures that technicians capable of not only installing, but also maintaining the solar-electric equipment will be readily available to the end users, reducing the likelihood that users will switch back to kerosene. Enersol plans to monitor system maintenance carefully.

While significant grid extension is not expected, Enersol will maintain contact with the Honduran Planning Ministry and ENEE (Honduran electric company) to assure that solar-based rural electrification efforts do not target communities slated for grid extension, should grid extension plans come into place.

F. Funding of the AIJ project

1. Identification of funding sources

This information is not yet available.

2. Assessment of additional funding needs

Current or Planned Activities to Obtain Additional Funding

Enersol's overall JI project funding strategy is based on securing grant contributions and/or investments from private and/or public sector JI-motivated sponsors. To attract sponsors, Enersol will focus on components of the project that offer the greatest appeal. Enersol will make known the various JI sponsorship and investment opportunities to prospective sponsors, either directly or through collaborating agencies, individuals, and brokers.

The main JI sponsorship and investment opportunities include: grant contributions to fund training and technical assistance and to capitalize Enersol's dedicated loan guarantee fund, the Fondo Solar; and loans to expand the Fondo Solar.

Furthermore, Enersol is in the process of working to expand its Fondo Solar. At the time the proposal was submitted to USIJI, a request for $100,000 of contributed equity to scale up the Fondo Solar was before a U.S.-headquartered NGO, interested in renewable energy projects in developing countries. Additionally, the manager of a large U.S. socially responsible investment fund expressed interest in making a debt investment of $100,000 to scale up the Fondo Solar. These and other private sources of debt and equity funding to expand the Fondo Solar are being pursued by Enersol.

G. Contribution to capacity building and technology transfer

Contribution to Capacity Building and Technology Transfer

The project will transfer energy-efficient solar electric technologies to Honduras. It will also provide training opportunities for Honduran citizens to work as technicians, entrepreneurs, and loan officers.

H. Recent developments, technical difficulties, and obstacles encountered

Recent Project Developments

This information is not yet available.

Technical Difficulties and Other Obstacles Encountered

This information is not yet available.

I. Additional information

Additional Information

None.

J. Annex

1. Host country acceptance of the AIJ project

Country/Project Title

Name, Title, and Government Agency of the Designated National Authority

Date of Approval(day/month/year)

Honduras/Solar-Based Rural Electrification

Dr. Carlos A. Medina, Environmental Minister, State Secretary of Environment

19 October 1994

2. Letters of approval of this AIJ project report

See attached letter of concurrence.


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