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ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTED JOINTLY(AIJ)
 

Uniform Reporting Format:

Activities Implemented Jointly Under the Pilot Phase

List of Projects

A. Description of the AIJ project

1. Title of project: Solar Light for the Churches of Africa

2. Host country: Uganda

3. Brief project description:

  • The project will provide electric light and radio to areas of rural Uganda where electric grid extension is unlikely. The goal is to electrify 5,000 churches, schools, health clinics, community centers and homes over the next two years. Each unit will be provided a solar lighting kit powered by a 60-watt roof-mounted solar module, with a battery for nighttime use.

    By replacing the existing kerosene lanterns, each system will save approximately 526 kg of CO2 per installation per year. The estimated reductions of CO2 total approximately 52,600 Tonnes over the 20-year lifetime of the project.

4. Participants:

Name of Organization or Individual Country

Solar Light for the Churches of Africa

USA

The Hathaway Foundation

USA

The Church of Uganda

Uganda

Solar Energy for Uganda, Ltd.

Uganda
Item
Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Solar Light for the Churches of Africa

Name of organization (English)

Solar Light for the Churches of Africa

Acronym (original language)

Acronym (English)

SLCA

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities(b)

Project development; project administration

Street

2300 Cathedral Ave. NW

City

Washington

State

DC

Post code

20008

Country

USA

Telephone

202-232-7490

Fax

202-232-7909

E-mail

Solarlight@starpower.net

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Hathaway

First name, middle name

Alden M.

Job title

Jr.

Direct telephone

202-785-8577 x 13

Direct fax

202-785-2739

Direct e-mail

aldenjr@earthlink.net

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item
Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

The Hathaway Foundation

Name of organization (English)

The Hathaway Foundation

Acronym (original language)

Acronym (English)

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities(b)

Project administration

Street

P.O. Box 399

City

Ambridge

State

PA

Post code

15003

Country

USA

Telephone

850-894-8566

Fax

E-mail

hathawayvi@worldnet.att.net

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Hathaway

First name, middle name

Rt. Rev. Alden M.

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item
Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

The Church of Uganda

Name of organization (English)

The Church of Uganda

Acronym (original language)

Acronym (English)

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities(b)

Project administration

Street

Willis Road

City

Namirembe

State

Kampala

Post code

P.O. Box 14123

Country

Uganda

Telephone

270218/9

Fax

251925

E-mail

couab@uol..co.ug

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Nkoyoyo

First name, middle name

The Most Rev Dr. Livingstone Mpalanyi

Job title

Archbishop

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item
Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Solar Energy for Uganda, Ltd.

Name of organization (English)

Solar Energy for Uganda, Ltd.

Acronym (original language)

Acronym (English)

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities(b)

Project administration

Street

13001 Greenstone Court

City

Silver Spring

State

MD

Post code

20904l

Country

USA

Telephone

301-384-6642

Fax

301-384-0091

E-mail

ssemand@tidalwave.net

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Ssemanda

First name, middle name

John

Job title

President

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item
Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Environmental Resources Trust

Name of organization (English)

Environmental Resources Trust

Acronym (original language)

ERT

Acronym (English)

ERT

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities(b)

Monitoring/verification

Street

1700 K Street, NW, suite 703

City

Washington

State

DC

Post code

20006

Country

USA

Telephone

202-785-8577 x 13

Fax

202-785-2739

E-mail

Ahathaway@ert.net

World Wide Web-URL address

www.ert.net

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Hathaway

First name, middle name

Alden Moinet, Jr.

Job title

Director, Clean Energy Programs

Direct telephone

202-785-8577 x 13

Direct fax

202-785-2739

Direct e-mail

Ahathaway@ert.net

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

  • 5. Description of AIJ project activities
Item
Type of Project

Sector(s)(a)

Energy

Primary activity(ies)(a)

Alternative energy generation (solar)

Project Location

Country

Uganda

Exact location (city, state, region)

(Various communities in eastern, central, western and southwestern Uganda)

Key Dates and Current Stage of Project

Project starting date(b) (month/year)

October/2000

Project ending date(c) (month/year)

October/2020

Project lifetime(d) (years)

20

Current stage of project(e)

In progress

General Project Description and Technical Data

Solar Light for the Churches of Africa is an ecumenical church development collaboration between primarily the Catholic and Anglican Churches for both East Africa (primarily Uganda) and the United States. The program is essentially a 50/50 match for providing electric light and radio in rural Africa where it is unlikely for electric power lines to be extended. Kerosene lanterns are replaced with electric compact fluorescent lights and, potentially, a radio, all powered by a solar panel mounted on the roof that charges a battery for nighttime use.

Both the Catholic and Anglican Churches request solar powered electric lighting kits by placing a 10% cash deposit with a Kampala solar equipment distributor, Solar Energy for Uganda, Ltd. SLCA then provides 50% funding for solar lighting kits to requesting diocesan (solar) coordinators in the East African countries of Uganda, Tanzania, Congo, Rwanda and Kenya. Solar Energy for Uganda finances the remaining 40% which is paid back over two years by the receiving church.

  • 6. Cost
    • (a) Explanation of methodology for calculating cost data

Methodology for Calculating Cost Data

5,000 installations, at US$1,200 each, including kit purchase price, international shipping, tarrif, in-country shipping and installation amount to an anticipated US$6 million. The kit includes a 60-watt solar module, six compact 8-watt fluorescent medium base screw-in lights (with in-line electronic ballast adapter), a charge controller, a 100-amp-hour deep cycle battery, switches, wiring, disconnect, and medium base sockets. The installation takes approximately 2 - 3 hours and, once completed, provides the facility with complete hard-wired wall-switch controlled lights for up to six rooms.

  • (b) Cost data–Project development
Itemized Project Development Costs Image
  • (c) Cost data–Project implementation
Itemized Project Implementation Costs Image Annual Project Implementation Cost

Image

  • 7. Monitoring and verification of AIJ project activities and results
Item Please Complete

Party(ies) that will be monitoring project activities(a)

Environmental Resources Trust

Party(ies) that will be externally verifying project results(a)

Environmental Resources Trust

Date when the monitoring plan became (or will become) operational (month/year)

(October/2002)

Types of data that will be collected(b)

Actual kerosene consumption

Description of Monitoring and Verification Activities and Schedule for Implementation

ERT will both monitor facilities where systems were installed and facilities where systems were not installed or facilities before they were installed. ERT will take a statistical sampling of facilities where systems were installed to determine if, and to what extent, the level of kerosene usage has been eliminated or reduced. In facilities where systems were not installed or have yet to be installed ERT will take a statistical sampling to determine what the baseline of kerosene usage is. From these two measurements, ERT will substantiate the carbon emission offsets created.

ERT will build a record monitoring protocol and deliver it to the diocesan solar coordinator where the data logging for the monitoring will be carried out. Each solar coordinator will record installations in a log book and visit sites on a biannual basis. Changes in system function; uses of electric vs. kerosene light; components replaced and other statistically important information will be recorded in the log.

ERT will return to Uganda, within three to four years to audit the logs and again at the seven year mark for an open audit. Information will be compiled by ERT and necessary adjustments made to the emission estimates to record actual values saved.

  • B. Governmental approval
Item Please Complete

Please check one of the following.

This report is a first report.

or

This report is an intermediate report.

or

This report is a final report.

Please check one of the following:

This report is a joint report. Letter(s) of approval of this report from the designated national authority of the other Party(ies) involved in the activity is(are) attached in Section J, Annex.

or

This report is a separate report.

Additional comments (if any):

  • C. Compatibility with, and supportiveness of, national economic development and socioeconomic and environmental priorities and strategies
Compatibility with Economic Development and Socioeconomic and Environmental Priorities

The May 23, 2000 approval letter from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs indicates that the Government of Uganda is "confident that the project …… will help promote sustainable development….." (For further details, see environmental, social/cultural, and economic impacts below.)

  • D. Environmental, social/cultural, and economic impacts of the AIJ project
Non-Greenhouse-Gas Environmental Impacts of the Project

Positive Health Impacts

Eliminating kerosene lanterns also eliminates the noxious fumes that are breathed in daily by the home dwellers. It is estimated that the equivalent of smoking two packs of cigarettes a day is daily breathed in the kerosene fumes. This has contributed to Uganda having an average expected life span of just 37 years.

Other Environmental Impacts

By successfully administering a national solar electrification program, the pressure to build a third dam on the Nile River for electricity generation may be diffused. The Nile River is home to some the Earth’s most famous natural wonders including Murcheson Falls National Park.

Social/Cultural Impacts of the Project

Solar Light Improves Education Opportunities for Students

In Uganda the competition for college education is very intense with only a relatively modest number of 1st-year college slots available to millions of potential students. Students raised in households or attending local school without electric light prove to be unable to compete with their peers able to read an additional 4 hours per night because of available electricity. Solar electric lighting is changing this paradigm. By electrifying schools with solar lights, students in rural areas now have the ability to compete with students from the electrified urban cities.

Solar Electric Power Brings Information

The solar electric lighting systems installed under the SLCA program afford enough power for a small television or radio. In some areas the project has been able to install enough power for a computer and an internet connection.

Solar Light for the Churches of Africa Program Brings Hope

The SLCA program is bringing hope and confidence in the local institutions like the church. The news is full of what happens with a people in despair. Recent events of the doomsday cult in Kanungu, Uganda point to this. Individuals and their families who have dedicated their life to serving others in the rural area are now being rewarded with the gift of light. This is a powerful message that is reverberating around the countryside instilling a sense of peaceful hopefulness.

Economic Impacts of the Project

Solar Light Improves the Standard of Living

Solar electric light offers an extension of the workday by up to four hours per evening. This allows for micro-enterprise-type activities to be undertaken that serve to increase income opportunities. Light also increases the yields of produce from farms dependent on food yields for their livelihood. For example solar electric light, which allows chickens to see their food and, thus, receive an extra feeding a day, can double egg production

  • E. Greenhouse gas impacts of the AIJ project

    1. Scenario description

Item Please Complete for Each Site
Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

1

Site name/designation

(One site only)

Project sector(a)

Energy

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)(a)

Alternative energy generation (solar)

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:(b)

5,000 solar PV lighting installations do not take place as proposed during the first 4 years of the project, and emissions due to kerosene combustion for lighting continue.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)(a)

Alternative energy generation (solar)

Description:(b)

PV solar lighting systems are installed, eliminating emissions due to kerosene combustion at those locations.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)(a)

Alternative energy generation (solar)

Description:(b)

(First report)

  • 2. GHG emission/sequestration calculation methodology
GHG Emission/Sequestration Calculation Methodology

Site number(a)

1

Project sector(a)

Energy

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Reference Scenario

The solar powered lights displace kerosene lanterns in 5000 households. According to the World Bank, Technical Paper #304, Photovoltaic Applications in Rural Areas of the Developing World, the average high income household or school uses up to 17 liters of kerosene per month (204 liters annually). The US DOE reports the average emissions of CO2 per liter of kerosene at 2.58 kg. Each household thus generates carbon dioxide emissions of approximately 526 kg per year due to the elimination of kerosene lanterns. (2.58 kg/L x 204 L/household/yr = 526 kg CO2/yr.) Thus, 5000 systems over twenty years would emit up to 52,600 Tonnes of carbon dioxide in the absence of the project.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Project Scenario

The project, if successful, would eliminate the emissions calculated in the reference scenario by substituting electric power from PV solar collectors, which generate no greenhouse gases.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Actual Project

Kerosene consumption will be monitored at facilities where PV lighting systems have been installed, and the rates will be compared with usage at comparable sites where no such systems are in use. Statistics derived from sample data will then be extrapolated to represent the entire project.

  • 3. GHG emission/sequestration data
    • (a) Reporting of GHG emissions/sequestration

Image
  • (b) Additional information on GHG emissions/sequestration

Indirect or Secondary GHG Impacts (Positive and Negative)

The success of the project may lead to replication elsewhere and to lower cost due to improved skills in design and installation of the systems.

Factors That Could Cause the Future Loss or Reversal of GHG Benefits

Inadequate maintenance or failure to repair or replace system components could cause GHG benefits to be lost.

Strategy for Reducing the Risk of Future Loss or Reversal of GHG Benefits

Solar Power for Uganda, Ltd., is responsible for system installation and maintenance. The arrangements with the local churches call for Solar Power for Uganda to provide system maintenance as part of the purchase agreement for the first 24 months of system operation. This company has been in business in Uganda for a number of years and has provided excellent service for the systems installed by SLCA to date, and in three and a half years there have been no system failures or significant maintenance issues.

  • F. Funding of the AIJ project

    1. Identification of funding sources

    • (a) Funding sources for project development

Funding Source Country of Funding Source Amount ($US) Percent of Total Funding (%)

Solar Light for the Churches of Africa

US NA 100

Total

NA 100
  • (b) Funding sources for project implementation

Funding Source Country of Funding Source Amount ($US) Percent of Total Funding (%) Is This Funding Assured? (Y/N)

Hathaway Foundation

US 3,000,000 50 N

Church of Uganda

Uganda 2,400,400 40 N

Users

Uganda 600,000 10 N

Total

6,000,000 100
  • 2. Assessment of additional funding needs:
Current or Planned Activities to Obtain Additional Funding

SLCA intends to eventually sell the emission offsets to interested international and/or American energy companies. Several have already been approached and may consider investing in the offsets if this project wins USIJI recognition. It is believed the value of the offsets could be $36,000 - $60,000.

  • G. Contribution to capacity building and technology transfer

Contribution to Capacity Building and Technology Transfer

The project accelerates the introduction of modern residential-scale PV technology within Uganda, including know-how needed locally for system design, installation and upkeep.

  • H. Recent developments, technical difficulties, and obstacles encountered
Recent Project Developments

The phase I pilot project was completed in 1998, and the full-scale project is ongoing.

Technical Difficulties and Other Obstacles Encountered

(None)

  • I. Additional information
Additional Information

J. Annex

  • 1. Host country acceptance of the AIJ project
Country/Project Title Name, Title, and Government Agency of the Designated National Authority Date of Approval (day/month/year)

Uganda/Solar Light for Churches of Africa

Ralph W. Ochan, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs

23/May/2000
  • 2. Letters of approval of this AIJ project report:
    • See attached letter of concurrence.

    K. Addendum for USIJI Secretariat Only

    1. Lead contact for project reporting

Item

Please Complete If Applicable
Organization

Name

Alden M. Hathaway Jr.

Organization (English)

Solar Lights for the Churches of Africa

Telephone

202-232-7490

Fax

202-232-7909

E-mail

aldenjr@earthlink.net

  • 2. Milestones
Milestone Date Initiated (if applicable) (month/year) Date Completed (if applicable) (month/year)

Substantive discussions regarding project

1997

Pre-feasibility study

Feasibility study

1997 1998

Project development (including construction and/or setting up on-site offices, purchase of lands, etc.)

1998 2000

Project operations (including starting management practices, distributing information, training, purchase of operating equipment, etc.)

2000 (Ongoing)

Sequestration or reduction of GHG emissions

October, 2000 (ongoing)

Project financing obtained

1999 (Ongoing)

Other (please specify)

  • 3. Assignment of GHG emission reductions
    • (a) Methodology for allocating GHG emission reductions.

Methodology for Allocating GHG Emission Reductions

No emissions reduction assignment agreements have yet been concluded. However, it is expected that an emission assignment agreement could be signed with an interested utility within the year. Until such an agreement is signed, however, SLCA will hold title to the offsets.

SLCA intends to eventually sell the emission offsets to interested international and/or American energy companies. Several have already been approached and may consider investing in the offsets if this project wins USIJI recognition. It is believed the value of the offsets could be $36,000 - $60,000. Utilities that SLCA has been in discussion with regarding the disposition of the offsets are:

DTE Energy, Detroit, MI

PPL Resources, Allentown, PA

American Electric Power, Columbus, OH

Pacificorp, Portland, OR

AES Corp, Arlington, VA

  • (b) Final assignment of GHG emission reductions
Participant Percentage of the Total Emission Reduction Assigned to This Participant

Solar Light for the Churches of Africa

100

Total

100
  • 4. Baseline GHG emission scenario (prior 12 months)
Period Baseline Emissions (Tonnes)
From (month/year) To (month/year) CO2 CH4 N2O Other (Specify) CO2-Equivalent

October, 1999

October, 2000

2,692 2,692
Methodology for Calculating Baseline Emission/Sequestration Estimates

One year’s emissions by the 5,000 installations to be converted by the project. (See methodology above)