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ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTED JOINTLY(AIJ)
 

Uniform Reporting Format:

Activities Implemented Jointly Under the Pilot Phase

List of Projects

  • A. Description of the AIJ project

    1. Title of project: Energy Centers for Mali

    2. Host country: Mali

    3. Brief project description:

    • We propose to design and implement energy centers that will serve as a first step in the introduction of energy efficient and environmentally friendly technologies and support services in peri-urban and rural African communities. These centers will serve several functions. The centers will serve as:
    • an energy center, selling and maintaining energy supplies and equipment for the home and businesses, including farms;
    • a communication center offering local and long distance telephone service, facsimile, and copying services;
    • an Internet café offering computer services and access to the Internet;
    • a building technology training center offering state-of-the-art building technology services in the design and building of area-appropriate energy efficient, environmentally friendly buildings;
    • a domestic demonstration and training center showcasing state-of-the-art, appropriate appliances and small tools for the home; and
    • a financial services center offering financial services, such as savings programs and loans, to assist with the purchasing, installation, maintenance, repair, and use of services and equipment provided at the center.
    • It is also envisioned that the center could become an infrastructure services company, serving as the bulk power supplier, for example, for the community where it is located, if desired.

    4. Participants:

Name of Organization or Individual Country

Sunergie SA

Mali

Soumaila Cisse

Mali

PEER Global Environment, Inc.

U.S.A.

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

Or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Sinergie SA

Contact: Dr. Salifou Bengaly

Name of organization (English)

Sinergie SA

Acronym (original language)

(N/A)

Acronym (English)

(N/A)

Department

(N/A)

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Mali counterpart, and project director

Street

1531, Bd Nelson Mandela Hippodrome II
BP E 2502

City

Bamako

State

Post code

Country

Mali

Telephone

223 21 78 71

Fax

223 77 04 83

E-mail

Sbengaly@spider.toolnet.org

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Abron

First name, middle name

Lilia

Job title

President

Direct telephone

301 816 0700

Direct fax

301 816 9291

Direct e-mail

Peer1@ix.netcom.com

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

Same as above

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

  • 5. Description of AIJ project activities
Item
Type of Project

Sector(s)

Climate change/ renewable energy utilization

Primary activity(ies)

Project Location

Country

Mali

Exact location (city, state, region)

Bamako, Segou, and Sikasso

Key Dates and Current Stage of Project

Project starting date (month/year)

Unknown

Project ending date (month/year)

Unknown

Project lifetime (years)

20 years

Current stage of project

Looking for funding

General Project Description and Technical Data

PEER Global Environment Foundation proposes to pilot this concept of energy centers in the West African country of Mali and to initially establish three centers; one in Segou, one in Sikasso, and one in Bamako. These are the three largest cities (Administrative Regions) in Mali. Bamako is the capital city, and is the most urban of the three. However, the capital city is only 15% electrified, so the services offered in the proposed centers are needed in all three cities. There are many reasons why we selected Mali for this initial project, but first and foremost is that Mali is a member of EWAS, the economic block for the French-speaking West African countries. Also, Mali tends to be a leader in this block, and if successful in Mali, these centers will be easily replicated throughout the other smaller countries in EWAS.

These centers will be set up to demonstrate sustainable techniques for traditional building methods, and provide needed energy, communication, and economic development services. All services provided by the center will be done on a "fee for service" basis and items sold will be at fair market prices. The intent is for the centers to be sustainable and capable of being replicated. This is a first step in market transformation for the utilization of new building, renewable energy, and other clean energy technologies.

The center is a solution to the challenge of bringing necessary sustainable economic development services to a population sector that would otherwise be the last group to be helped as growth and development of a country occur, the rural and peri-urban sector. This project also begins to address the challenge of how to make rural areas acceptable to young people. For the purposes of this project, we are calling these centers "Energy Centers," but the name can change depending on each community’s preference.

The centers will demonstrate and sell appropriate renewable energy devices and other clean fuels for domestic and commercial uses. The centers will sell such items as propane (LPG) for cooking, 12-volt batteries, and distilled water for the batteries, charcoal, etc. The center will also sell and demonstrate the equipment and appliances that utilize energy-efficiency designs, such as televisions, radios, lamps, refrigerators, sewing machines, solar water pumps, hydraulic pumps, passive solar stoves, PV and passive solar water heaters, LPG stoves, PV systems of all types, etc.

The center would also serve as the communication center for the area. It will provide a local and long distance telephone service utilizing solar powered cellular phones if possible, access to computers and the Internet by serving as an Internet café. Other miscellaneous communication services may include photo and facsimile services; provided these services are not offered by other facilities in the area. The ability to offer these services will also be dependent on the location of the telephone satellite or line-connected telephone services, as well as Internet satellites. The overall intent is to utilize and demonstrate, as much as possible, renewable and other clean energies and to stimulate the desire for these products in that market place.

The center will be the supplier and maintenance provider of a variety of energy-generating devices and technologies. It is envisioned that the center will sell, install and maintain PV systems, LPG stoves, solar ovens, passive solar water heating systems, 12-volt batteries and the ability to charge those batteries, solar-powered batteries for cell phones, and other devices, and appropriate appliances and other devices. The center could become the energy store for the area if one does not exist, or it could combine its efforts with the business that is already providing energy supplies. These decisions will be made during the planning phases of the project. It is also envisioned that at some point the center could serve as a bulk power supplier for the region or community where it is located.

  • 6. Cost
    • (a) Explanation of methodology for calculating cost data

Methodology for Calculating Cost Data

The cost data are composed of actual costs for project development to date, and estimated costs for labor, travel, communication, building and equipping the center, and training staff to manage and operate all operations and activities of the center.

  • (b) Cost data–Project development

Itemized Project Development Costs Image
  • (c) Cost data–Project implementation

Itemized Project Implementation Costs
Year(s) Item Projected Amount

(US$)

Actual Amount

(US$)

Project Costs

1st year

Labor:

Project Principal 160 hrs.

34,400.00

Project Manager 460 hrs.

53,820.00

Project Associate, level 3 160 hrs.

14,400.00

Site Manager

137,280.00

Management Trainees

50,000.00

Center Operator/staff (6 months)

50,000.00

Consultants

50,000.00

Travel and Expenses:

U.S./Mali 3 trips

6,000.00

South Africa/Mali 6 trips

12,000.00

Communications

5,000.00

Travel in Mali (car rental, petro, plane fares, etc.)

25,000.00

Housing for Site Manager/project team

20,000.00

Center construction and equipment for Center:

Cost of Center

10,000.00

Mudbrick Equipment

5,000.00

Rammed Earth equipment

100,000.00

Battery Charging station

25,000.00

Refrigerator and freezer

5,000.00

Cell phones, and computers

30,000.00

Fax and copy machines

2,000.00

Budget for rest of inventory

50,000.00

Subtotal

684,900

Project Revenues
Grants and loans

684,900

Subtotal

Net Project Cost (Project Costs-Project Revenues)

0

NA

  • 7. Monitoring and verification of AIJ project activities and results
Item Please Complete

Party(ies) that will be monitoring project activities

PEER Global Environment Foundation
Mali Ministry of the Environment

Party(ies) that will be externally verifying project results

Wits University in South Africa and University of Mali and Mali Solar Energy Research Center

Date when the monitoring plan became (or will become) operational (month/year)

Monitoring plan will become operational the same day the center opens.

Types of data that will be collected

Description of Monitoring and Verification Activities and Schedule for Implementation

A physical and social monitoring plan will be developed to monitor the baseline, and greenhouse gas emissions and greenhouse gas emissions reductions. The plan will be developed for a one-year, in-depth monitoring program of all energy uses in the store and the residence in the store, and the plan will call for periodic verification of the results obtained during the one-year, in-depth study. PEER Global will be responsible for monitoring the greenhouse gas emissions and greenhouse gas emissions reductions/sequestration over the lifetime of the project.

The specific data to be collected will be quantities of the various fuels used, solar-power generated and used, frequency of use and time of use, number of 12-volt batteries charged using the 12-volt solar-powered station, and using the back-up diesel generator. Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide levels in the store and the residence will be measured. The frequency of use of the LPG and solar ovens and what they were used for, and frequency of use of all of the equipment in the store will be monitored and documented. As items are purchased in the store, data will be kept on how the items were used, and how often. The intent is to determine if market transformation to the new technologies is occurring.

The baseline will basically be the condition that would have existed in the absence of the interventions. It is assumed that the traditional ways of cooking, working, and lighting would continue. We will rely on national data to verify these estimates, and we will base the estimates on actual use data of the interventions. We will monitor daily for one year the use (quantities of the various fuels consumed, solar power used and times of use, 12-volt battery usage, and number of batteries charged using the solar-powered charging station, and the back-up generator) the usage of the various interventions in the store, and the residence in the store. This detailed, daily monitoring of all energy usages in the store and the residence will also help us to more accurately define the potential for emission losses due to the use of traditional fuels and the traditional ways of doing things.

We plan to collect detail data for at least one year. This will give us valuable insights into how people actually live and use these interventions. These data are very valuable for verifying carbon saved, avoided, or mitigated, and the factors that could cause reversal. Data collection procedures, including a description of the sampling methodologies, emissions monitoring equipment and methodologies for estimating emissions from the raw data will be described.

Data collection procedures are changing every day so we can say at this time how the data will be collected, and the actual schedule. We are sure that the first year will consist of constant monitoring, but that could change, since the continuous monitoring being done by us now for another project is generating more data than we know what to do with. We are presently using state-of-the-art data loggers being monitored remotely by cell phones for the monitoring we are presently engaged in. The equipment we are using has never been used before for this type of work, but it is doing everything we wanted it to do, and is saving a lot of time, and security for our workers in the field is a moot point.

The preparation of a monitoring plan for these projects is quite expensive and funds will be sought to prepare the monitoring plan, and purchase the equipment for monitoring.

  • B. Governmental approval
Item Please Complete

Please check one of the following.

This report is a first report.

Or

This report is an intermediate report.

Or

This report is a final report.

Please check one of the following:

This report is a joint report. Letter(s) of approval of this report from the designated national authority of the other Party(ies) involved in the activity is(are) attached in Section J, Annex.

or

This report is a separate report.

Additional comments (if any):

  • C. Compatibility with, and supportiveness of, national economic development and socioeconomic and environmental priorities and strategies
Compatibility with Economic Development and Socioeconomic and Environmental Priorities

There is a total of 1 megawatts of power in the entire country of Mali. There are 10 million inhabitants of that country. The country is basically described at rural and peri-urban. The World Bank is presently working a major lending scheme to assist with the electrification of the rural and peri-urban areas. In fact, the capital city Bamako is only 15% electrified. Thus, this project is compatible with the economic development and socioeconomic and environmental priorities.

  • D. Environmental, social/cultural, and economic impacts of the AIJ project
Non-Greenhouse-Gas Environmental Impacts of the Project

The project also meets the qualifications of projects classified as "NO Regrets." Thus, this project has significant, positive non-Greenhouse Gas environmental impacts as well.

Social/Cultural Impacts of the Project

The social and cultural impacts of this project are equally as significant. The project will enhance the ability of the country to nurture and document its culture for posterity, and the energy centers will serve as a coalescing point for communities where they are located.

Economic Impacts of the Project

The center will provide jobs for the community, training for community residents, savings programs to purchase services sold at the center which will enhance the lifestyles of the community members, and the center will sell time saving and energy devices for the home and the work environment. Also, by providing a reliable source of energy, the energy services provided by the center will stimulate economic growth of the community where they are located.

  • E. Greenhouse gas impacts of the AIJ project

    1. Scenario description

Item Please Complete for Each Site
Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

Site name/designation

Energy Centers for Mali

Project sector

Energy

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

Selling renewable energy services, and appliances and tools, operating an internet café and cell phone store, providing small business training, micro loans, and energy efficient building materials.

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

The reference scenario is explained in the first section of this report.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

Description:

The project will employ specific measures to make solar technologies and LPG known, available, and affordable, and thereby result in a significant reduction of diesel, petroleum, kerosene, wood, and charcoal. The measures include the introduction and use of renewable energy technologies, clean fuels, innovative building materials, training programs, and savings programs for the purposes of improving the quality of life, promoting economic development, and improvement of the environment including the reduction and avoidance of the generation of greenhouse gases. The overall goal is market transformation to the utilization of clean fuels and energy efficient and environmentally friendly technologies and devices. These measures will include active demonstrations and utilization of PV systems, passive solar systems, and bottled gas (LPG) as practical and positive alternatives to the utilization of fossil fuels for meeting the energy needs of homes and communities. The center will utilize these fuels and technologies on a daily basis, conduct demonstrations of the technologies and devices, provide these services, technologies, and devices on a retail basis and also provide installation, maintenance and spare parts items sold in the center. Additional services offered will be communication services (phone center, computer center, internet café, etc.), home building services, training, and financial services in the form of establishing a savings program to aid the residents in obtaining the items and services being provided by the centers.

The exact location for the center is not known at this time.

It is assumed that PV systems will be used to replace kerosene for lighting and a significant amount of diesel fuel used for operating generators for battering charging and the operation of small machines and equipment. LPG will be used to replace the kerosene, wood, and charcoal used for cooking and passive solar systems will be used to replace the wood, charcoal, and kerosene used for water heating.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

Description:

The project has not started yet. We are still looking for funding.

  • 2. GHG emission/sequestration calculation methodology

GHG Emission/Sequestration Calculation Methodology

Site number

Project sector

Energy

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Reference Scenario

Well over 80% of Malin residents live without easy access to electricity and other clean fuels that could provide energy for existing uses and economic growth and development of the country. The state-run electric utility that provides electricity to most of the country from Bamako is overwhelmed trying to meet its current mandates. In fact, the capital city is only 15% electrified. Presently, a majority of the households depend on kerosene lamps for lighting, wood and charcoal for cooking, the utilization of 12-volt batteries for the operation of lamps, televisions and other small machines, and diesel for the operation of generators to produce electricity when the central power grid is down and for the operation of small machines and other equipment. The combustion of kerosene, wood, charcoal, and other fossil fuels such as kerosene, diesel, and petroleum results in the emissions, primarily of CO2 and CH4. Additionally, the disposal of spent 12-volt batteries often results in contamination of soils and water. The availability of these energy centers would aid in reducing significantly the dependence on these commonly used fuels and devices for power and energy.

The yearly per-capita consumption of wood, charcoal, gas/diesel, and kerosene fuels for the rural areas of Mali follow (data obtained from the 1992 National Biomass Study):

Fuel Type Annual Per-Capita Usage

Wood 550 kg

Charcoal 250 kg

Kerosene 4.5 kg

A typical Malian family is assumed to consist of 8 members.

Fuel wood combustion evolves about 1.7 tonnes CO2/tonne bone-dry wood, but the wood being burned is probably 50% moisture, the figure becomes 0.85 tonnes CO2 per tonne of wood. The wood burning probably also emits methane, but this is quite sensitive to specific conditions like draft air and will not be addressed in this analysis for wood.

Kerosene has 853 kilograms of carbon per tonne and thus emits 853 x 44/12 =3.130 tonnes CO2/tonne of fuel.

Charcoal is between 85% and 98% carbon (and will be assumed to be 90% carbon) so burning a tonne of carbon emits 900 kg times 44/12 = 3.3 tonnes CO2. In addition, charcoal production directly gives off 492 kg of CO2 and between 21 and 26 kg of CH4 per tonne. So the total is 3.8 tonnes CO2 plus another 23.5 kg of CH4 per tonne of charcoal. The CO2 equivalent of the CH4 is 21 times 23.5 kg = 0.5 tonnes per tonne of charcoal.

Based on the above data, a Malian family will produce the following amounts of CO2:

Wood: (0.85t CO2/t wood)*(0.55t/person/yr)*(8 people/family) = 3.8t CO2/family/yr

Kerosene: (3.13t CO2/t kerosene)*(0.0045t/person/yr)*(8 people/family) = 0.1t CO2/family/yr

Charcoal:

Indirect CO2 generation: (3.3t CO2/t charcoal)*(0.25t/person/yr)*(8 people/family) = 6.6t CO2/ family/yr

Direct CO2 generation: (0.5t CO2/t charcoal)*(0.25t/person/yr)*(8 people/family) = 1.0t CO2/family/yr

CO2 from CH4 generation: (0.0245t CH4/t charcoal)*(21t CO2/1t CH4)*(0.25t/person/yr)* (8 people/family) = 1.1t CO2/family/yr

Total CO2 generation from charcoal = 8.7t CO2/family/yr

Total CO2 generation per family per year = 12,600 kg

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Project Scenario

The project will employ specific measures to make solar technologies and LPG known, available, and affordable, and thereby result in a significant reduction of diesel, petroleum, kerosene, wood, and charcoal. The measures include the introduction and use of renewable energy technologies, clean fuels, innovative building materials, training programs, and savings programs for the purposes of improving the quality of life, promoting economic development, and improvement of the environment including the reduction and avoidance of the generation of greenhouse gases. The overall goal is market transformation to the utilization of clean fuels and energy efficient and environmentally friendly technologies and devices. These measures will include active demonstrations and utilization of PV systems, passive solar systems, and bottled gas (LPG) as practical and positive alternatives to the utilization of fossil fuels for meeting the energy needs of homes and communities. The center will utilize these fuels and technologies on a daily basis, conduct demonstrations of the technologies and devices, provide these services, technologies, and devices on a retail basis and also provide installation, maintenance and spare parts for the items sold in the center. Additional services offered will be communication services (phone center, computer center, internet café, etc.), home building services, training, and financial services in the form of establishing a savings program to aid the residents in obtaining the items and services being provided by the centers.

Three areas will be selected for the installation of the centers: Sikasso, Segou, and Bamako. The exact location for each center is not known at this time.

It is assumed that PV systems will be used to replace kerosene for lighting and a significant amount of diesel fuel used for operating generators for battering charging and the operation of small machines and equipment. LPG will be used to replace the kerosene, wood and charcoal used for cooking and passive solar systems will be used to replace the wood, charcoal, and kerosene used for water heating. Thus, for purposes of these calculations, we are assuming that 70% of the wood, charcoal, and kerosene being used now will be replaced using other fuels and energy sources, and the use of diesel will be reduced by 90%. The diesel reduction could be significant economically, since all diesel in Mali is presently imported. There are no GHG emissions associated with the utilization of solar systems, either passive or PV. There are greenhouse gas emissions associated with the use of LPG, but it is a significantly cleaner and environmentally acceptable fuel.

There is a total of 1.9 kg CO2 produced per kg of LPG. It is assumed that this project will substitute 20% of the BTU energy generated from wood, kerosene, and charcoal in the reference scenario with LPG. Given that wood generates 19,000 BTU/kg, kerosene generates 50,000 BTU/kg, and charcoal generates 24,500 BTU/kg, the following calculates the total BTU generation per family per year:

  • [(19,000)*(550)+(50,000)*(4.5)+(24,500)*(250)](8 people/family) = 135 million BTU/family/yr

LPG will substitute for 20% of this amount or 27 million BTU/family/yr.

The amount of LPG needed to produce 27 million BTU is

  • 27,000,000 BTU / 90,500 BTU/gal = 300 gal of LPG

    27,000,000 BTU / 30,000 BTU/kg = 900 kg/yr

The following calculations present the amount of GHG generated by the project scenario:

CO2 from LPG:

900 kg/yr * 1.9 kg CO2/kg LPG = 1,700 kg CO2/family/year

CO2 from non-substituted wood/kerosene/charcoal:

(0.3)*(12,600 kg CO2/family/yr)= 3,780 kg CO2/family/yr

Total CO2 generated from project scenario: 5,500 kg/family/yr

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Actual Project

Project has not been funded, therefore there is not an actual project yet.

  • 3. GHG emission/sequestration data
    • (a) Reporting of GHG emissions/sequestration

Projected Net Greenhouse Gas Benefits: All Project Sites

(Tonnes, Full Molecular Weight Basis)

Year 1 = 2002
Reference Scenario Emissions Project Scenario Emissions Net GHG Benefits

(Reference Scenario - Project Scenario)

Cumulative GHG Benefits

(Reference Scenario - Project Scenario)

Year CO2 CH4 N2O CO2 CH4 N2O CO2 CH4 N2O CO2-

Equivalent

CO2 CH4 N2O CO2-

Equivalent

1

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

18

0.1

21

2

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

35

0.3

41

3

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

53

0.4

62

4

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

71

0.6

83

5

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

89

0.7

103

6

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

106

0.8

124

7

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

124

1.0

144

8

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

142

1.1

165

9

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

159

1.3

186

10

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

177

1.4

206

11

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

195

1.5

227

12

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

212

1.7

248

13

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

230

1.8

268

14

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

248

2.0

289

15

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

266

2.1

310

16

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

283

2.2

330

17

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

301

2.4

351

18

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

319

2.5

372

19

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

336

2.7

392

20

34.2

0.14

16.5

0.00

17.7

0.14

20.6

354

2.8

413

Total

684

3

330

0

354

3

413

354

3

413

  • (b) Additional information on GHG emissions/sequestration
Indirect or Secondary GHG Impacts (Positive and Negative)

(N/A)

Factors That Could Cause the Future Loss or Reversal of GHG Benefits

Factors that could cause the future loss of reversal of GHG benefits are primarily economic. An increasing number of community residents having sufficient financial means to purchase the clean fuels and new technologies may not occur. Those that are using the cleaner fuels and newer technologies may not be able to maintain this standard of living. The availability of LPG may stop. The supply of services, equipment, and fuels being offered by the kiosks may not be able to keep up with demand, and others have not entered the market to help meet the demand for these items. Thus, people would return to the old ways of running their households, businesses, and farming practices. Projected emission reductions could also occur if availability of grid electricity occurs and it is cheaper than these measures to meet the energy requirements of their daily lives.

Strategy for Reducing the Risk of Future Loss or Reversal of GHG Benefits

Project is not operational, thus no strategies have been devised.

  • F. Funding of the AIJ project

    1. Identification of funding sources

    • (a) Funding sources for project development

Funding Source Country of Funding Source Amount ($US) Percent of Total Funding (%)

PEER Global Environment Foundation, Inc.

Total

100
  • (b) Funding sources for project implementation

Funding Source Country of Funding Source Amount ($US) Percent of Total Funding (%) Is This Funding Assured? (Y/N)

Project has not been implemented

Total

100
  • 2. Assessment of additional funding needs:
Current or Planned Activities to Obtain Additional Funding

We submitted a proposal for project funding to the Ashden Foundation. It was not accepted. We recently prepared a proposal to the World Bank in its Marketplace Development Program. It was not accepted. We are presently preparing proposals to UNEP, the Solar Development Fund, and OPIC. We have not been able to get debriefings to determine why the Ashden Foundation or the World Bank did not accept the proposals.

  • G. Contribution to capacity building and technology transfer
Contribution to Capacity Building and Technology Transfer

The centers will be staffed and operated completely by community residents. This is an excellent example of capacity building and technology transfer. PEER Global will train the proprietor of the center and all the staff on how to manage the center, operate the equipment, install it, and repair it. It is anticipated that the first training program will be multi-tiered and will consist of classroom and hands-on training. The program will take 4 months of classroom and we will work the staff intensely for the next 8 months. At the end of the first year of operation, we will provide a site manager that will work with the staff for another year, and then after that the site manger will start decreasing the amount of time spent at the center. We expect full turnover of the center to the community or the owner within a 3 to 5 year period.

  • H. Recent developments, technical difficulties, and obstacles encountered
Recent Project Developments

Not applicable.

Technical Difficulties and Other Obstacles Encountered
  • I. Additional information
Additional Information

J. Annex

  • 1. Host country acceptance of the AIJ project

Country/Project Title Name, Title, and Government Agency of the Designated National Authority Date of Approval (day/month/year)

Mali, "Energy Center for Mali"

Minister Soumaila Cisse, Minister de l’Environement

July 2000

  • 2. Letters of approval of this AIJ project report:
    • See attached letter of concurrence.

(concurrence letter)


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