Your location: Home

ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTED JOINTLY(AIJ)
 

Uniform Reporting Format:

Activities Implemented Jointly Under the Pilot Phase

List of Projects

A. Description of project

1) Title of project:

Burkina Faso Sustainable Energy Management

2) Participants/actors

Item Please fill in if applicable

Name of organization)

Ministry of Forestry and Water

Name of organization (English):

Department:

Acronym:

Acronym (English):

Functions within activity:

Burkina Faso government contact for project implementation

Street:

BP 7044 Ouagadougou

Post code:

Principal Contact:

Cecilia Some

City:

Ouagadougou

Country:

Burkina Faso

Telephone:

226 32 46 44

Fax:

226 32 46 45/36 74 58

E-mail:

WWW-URL:

Additional Contact person (for this activity):

Surname:

Honadia

First name, middle name:

Mamadou

Job title:

Ingenieur CONAGESE

Direct tel:

226 31 2464

Direct fax:

226 31 6491

Direct E-mail:

Item Please fill in if applicable

Name of organizationa)

Name of organization (English):

Government of Norway Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Department:

Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Affairs

Acronym:

Acronym (English):

Functions within activity:

Governmental authority responsible for committing financial resources for AIJ projects and approval of AIJ project agreements and reports

Street:

Victoria Terrasse

Post code:

P.O. Box 8114 Dep

City:

N-0032 Oslo

Country:

Norway

Telephone:

47 22 24 36 03

Fax:

47 22 24 27 82

E-mail:

WWW-URL:

Contact person (for this activity):

Mr. Erik Bjornebye

Surname:

Bjornebye

First name, middle name:

Erik

Job title:

Head of Division

Direct tel:

47 22 24 36 19

Direct fax:

47 22 24 27 82

Direct E-mail:

Item Please fill in if applicable

Name of organizationa)

Name of organization (English):

World Bank

Department:

Environment

Acronym:

Acronym (English):

ENV

Functions within activity:

Management and administration of the AIJ project on behalf of the government of Norway.

Street:

1818 H

Post code:

20433

City:

Washington DC.

Country:

USA

Telephone:

202-477-1234

Fax:

202-477-6391

E-mail:

Kgeorgieva@WORLDBANK.ORG/cc

WWW-URL:

www.worldbank.org/climatechange

Contact person (for this activity):

Mr. Koffi Ekouevi

Surname:

Ekouevi

First name, middle name:

Koffi

Job title:

RPTES Program Coordinator

Direct tel:

202-473-1391

Direct fax:

202-473-8249

3) Activity:

Same as previous

Project Description

Same as previous

  • Costs and cumulative and unit quantities of CO2 emissions sequestration 6 and 30 years after implementation of the AIJ-RPTES project

Project components

Cost per

Component

(US$)

CO2 emission sequestration

(x1000 tons of CO2)

Unit cost of sequestration

per ton of CO2

(US$/ton CO2)

6 years

30 years

6 years

30 years

Development and pilot

Sales of kerosene stoves

500,000 271 6,006

1.84

10.08

Promotion of solar

Photovoltaic systems

280,000 18 163

15.49

1.72

Sustainable forest

Management

970,000 245 3,725

3.96

0.25

Promotion of improved

Carbonization techniques

650,000 916 15,170

0.71

0.04

TOTAL

2,400,000 1,450 25,164

1.66

0.10

5) Mutually agreed assessment procedures

Same as previous

B. Governmental acceptance, approval or endorsement

Previous report

1) For the activity:

  • First report and joint reporting: please add copies of letters of endorsement by each designated national authority of Parties involved in the activity.
  • Subsequent reports

Activity was: __ suspended

__ terminated earlier

Describe:

2) This report is a joint report:

_x_ Yes, forward copy of agreement/endorsement by the designated national authorities involved

__ No

E. Calculation of the contribution of activities implemented jointly projects that bring about real, measurable and long-term environmental benefits related to the mitigation of climate change that would not have occurred in the absence of such activities

Summary table: Projected emissions reductions:

GHG

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

A) Project baseline scenario

CO2

0.1

0.75

0.75

1.5

CH4

N2O

Other

B) Project activity scenarioa)

CO2

0.09

0.6755

0.6755

1.35

CH4

N2O

Other

C) Effect (B-A)

CO2

0.01

0.075

0.075

0.15

CH4

N2O

Other

D) Cumulative effect

CO2

0.01

0.085

0.16

0.31

H. Additional comments, if any, including any practical experience gained or technical difficulties, effects, impacts or other obstacles encountered

The World Bank, DANIDA, and the Dutch Government have harmonized their approach to the sector and joint supervision missions have been conducted to monitor activities of the sector.

At the level of the Project with several components, the following issues and activities are relevant to mention:

Institutional framework: The institutional arrangements to coordinate the Program was very slow to become effective. The Program was officially launched on January 17, 1998. However, the coordination unit became effective only in May 1999. This initial delay requires an extension of the Program for about a year in order to implement programmed activities.

Community based forest management: The following activities were conducted: (i) data collection and participatory diagnostic study of in the project area. Upon completion of the work, the potentialities and constraints related, inter alia, to soil, vegetation, wildlife, hydrography and exploitation of forest resources were identified. In addition, backstopping activities with performance indicators were identified by village; and (ii) forest land use cartography. The forest inventory is the main activity to be conducted before effective management of the identified forests.

Promotion of improved carbonization technology: Studies were initiated to assess the charcoal situation (production area, production techniques, producers, distributors etc.) in relation to the five major towns in Burkina Faso. Existing carbonization techniques were evaluated and improved technologies identified. The outcomes of these studies show that charcoal production is not organized and that it is done on demand. The traditional pit, the traditional millstone, the Casamance millstone are the three carbonization technologies that were identified. The Casamance millstone was adopted as being the most energy efficient. The adoption of a master plan for supplying the major towns with charcoal still depends on the outcome of the studies on the supply of Burkina’s urban centers with charcoal.

Development and promotion of kerosene stoves: Target groups for the promotion and pilot sale of kerosene stoves were identified as well as the development of a model of stove that is effective and appropriate in technical and socio-economic terms. Under this component, it is planned to disseminate 2,000 stoves.

Promotion of solar photovoltaic systems: Studies were conducted to identify six villages to be equipped with solar photovoltaic systems. Key criteria used in the selection of the villages were strategic location in terms of enhancing social, health, educational and economic facilities. The equipment have been ordered and expected to be delivered in the coming months.

A technical evaluation of the Program was conducted in March 2001 by Dr. Youba Sokona (ENDA-Tiers Monde) and Mr. Gabriel Yameogo (EDEN). This evaluation has recommended specific capacity building activities directed to the coordination unit of the project and also to stakeholders. In addition, the evaluation has pointed out the paucity of reference data of the program making monitoring of implementation.

Project related risks

Component

Promotion and pilot sales of kerosene stoves

  • Probable reluctance on the part of households to use kerosene as fuel for cooking;
  • It is possible that the studies may not succeed in identifying and/or developing a suitable model of kerosene stove that is attractive in terms of purchase price and use compared with the woodfuel and/or butane gas options;
  • The final phase of large-scale dissemination of kerosene stoves may be compromised if there is not effective mobilization of the financial resources necessary for the pursuit of the operation.

Promotion of solar photovoltaic systems

  • Electrification may not be one of target populations’ priorities;
  • Risk of not being able to make the project outcomes permanent if the beneficiary populations do not contribute to and fail to cooperate in the upkeep and maintenance of the equipment installed.

Sustainable forest management

  • Risks of the populations not cooperating in the formulation and implementation of the forest development and management plans and programs.
  • Flexibility of the project

The AIJ-RPTES project has a certain flexibility for coping with unforeseen situations or factors beyond its control. In point of fact, in the annex to the grant agreement it is specified (subparagraph 2.1.i.d) that "the Beneficiary shall, if need be, enter into exchanges of views with the IDA representatives on the status of progress and the results of the activities" of the project. This provision makes it possible, in the course of implementation of the project, to propose adjustment measures together with requests for financing to the Donor if necessary in order to remove various constraints.

It was in this context that a request for adjustment of financing was submitted by the Burkina Government to enable an "operating costs" category to be taken into account at the beginning of 1999 in order to strengthen the operating capacity for implementation of the project by giving it a minimum of autonomy of operation. This request was the subject of a notice of no objection from the World Bank in June 1999, thereby authorizing that personnel and operating costs be taken into account.

  • Monitoring and evaluation of the project

    The monitoring and evaluation of the AIJ-RPTES project are performing in the first place by the technical directorates responsible for the implementation of the different components and by the target groups in the project implementation zones.

    The Coordination Unit does the monitoring and evaluation of implementation of all the components on the basis of a monitoring and evaluation system integrated into the RPTES program.

    It will analyze any implementation shortcomings and propose solutions in conjunction with the managers of the implementation structures.

    Quarterly, half-yearly, annual and detailed reports will be prepared in accordance with the provisions of the grant agreement and the project planning.

    The monitoring and evaluation system must make it possible to adjust and/or reorient the project activities in light of the outcomes obtained and the constraints encountered, and also to measure the impact and performance of the project.

N:PatrickkBF-UNFCCC-rpt-2001.doc

May 18, 2001 7:04 PM