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ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTED JOINTLY (AIJ)
 
USIJI Uniform Reporting Document:
Activities Implemented Jointly Under the Pilot Phase

List of Projects

A. Description of the AIJ project

1. Title of project: RUSAGAS: Fugitive Gas Capture Project

2. Host country: Russian Federation

3. Brief project description:

The RUSAGAS Project will reduce greenhouse (GHG) emissions by capturing fugitive natural gas emissions at two compressor stations located in Pallasovka and Saratov, Russian Federation. The project, which has a lifetime of 25 years, is implementing a program to seal the valves at the compressor stations, and thereby reduce methane (CH4) emissions that would occur otherwise.

4. Participants:

Name of Organization or Individual
Country

GAZPROM

Russian Federation

The Center for Energy Efficiency (CENEf)

Russian Federation

Oregon State University (OSU)

U.S.A.

Sealweld Corporation

U.S.A.

Sustainable Development Technology Corp. (SDTC)

U.S.A.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Climate Change Division

U.S.A.

Southern California Gas Company

U.S.A.
Item
Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

GAZPROM

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

None

Acronym (English)

None

Department

Department for Scientific and Technical Progress and Ecology

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project development, project administration, financing

Street

Stroiteley Str., 8

City

Moscow

State

Post code

117939

Country

Russian Federation

Telephone

7-095-133-71-69

Fax

7-095-133-63-20

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Bordiugov

First name, middle name

Anatolij G.

Job title

Chief Technologist

Direct telephone

7-095-133-71-69

Direct fax

7-095-133-63-20

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item
Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

The Center for Energy Efficiency

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

CENEf

Acronym (English)

None

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project development, project administration

Street

54, Korpus, 4, Novocheremushkinskaya St.

City

Moscow

State

Post code

117418

Country

Russian Federation

Telephone

7-095-120-5147

Fax

7-095-883-9563

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Gritsevich

First name, middle name

Inna G.

Job title

Leading Researcher

Direct telephone

7-095-120-5147

Direct fax

7-095-883-9563

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item
Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Oregon State University

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

OSU

Acronym (English)

None

Department

Department of Civil Engineering

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project development, project administration, financing

Street

202 Apperson Hall

City

Corvallis

State

Oregon

Post code

97331-2302

Country

U.S.A.

Telephone

541-737-3494

Fax

541-737-3052

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Vinson

First name, middle name

Ted S.

Job title

Ph.D., P.E.

Direct telephone

541-737-3494

Direct fax

541-737-3052

Direct e-mail

vinsont@ccmail.orst.edu

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item
Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Sealweld Corporation

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

None

Acronym (English)

None

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project development, technical assistance, financing

Street

7240 Brittmoore, Suite 120

City

Houston

State

Texas

Post code

77041

Country

U.S.A.

Telephone

713-937-9222

Fax

713-896-0821

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Chisholm

First name, middle name

Hugh

Job title

President

Direct telephone

713-937-9222

Direct fax

713-896-0821

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item
Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Sustainable Development Technology Corp

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

SDTC

Acronym (English)

None

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project development, technical assistance, financing

Street

3930 NW Witham Hill Dr., Suite M116

City

Corvallis

State

Oregon

Post code

97330

Country

U.S.A.

Telephone

541-737-6156

Fax

541-737-3052

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Kolchugina

First name, middle name

Tatyana P.

Job title

President

Direct telephone

541-737-6156

Direct fax

541-737-3052

Direct e-mail

kolchugt@ccmail.orst.edu

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item
Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Climate Change Division

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

EPA

Acronym (English)

None

Department

Climate Change Division

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Financing

Street

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Policy Analysis, 401 M Street SW

City

Washington

State

District of Columbia

Post code

20026

Country

U.S.A.

Telephone

202-260-6803

Fax

202-260-6405

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Andrasko

First name, middle name

Kenneth

Job title

Direct telephone

202-586-3179

Direct fax

202-586-3485

Direct e-mail

andrasko.ken@epamail.epa.gov

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item
Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Southern California Gas Company

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

None

Acronym (English)

None

Department

Transmission and Storage Operations

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Verification

Street

555 West Fifth Street

City

Los Angeles

State

California

Post code

90013-1011

Country

U.S.A.

Telephone

213-244-1600

Fax

213-244-8222

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Strang

First name, middle name

George E.

Job title

Vice President

Direct telephone

213-244-1600

Direct fax

213-244-8222

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

5. Description of AIJ project activities

Item
Type of Project

Sector(s)

Energy

Primary activity(ies)

Capture of fugitive methane emissions

Project Location

Country

Russian Federation

Exact location (city, state, region)

Pallasovka and Saratov

Key Dates and Current Stage of Project

Project starting date (month/year)

June 1995

Project ending date (month/year)

December 2022

Project lifetime (years)

27 years and 7 months

Current stage of project

In progress

General Project Description and Technical Data


The RUSAGAS Fugitive Gas Capture Project reduces methane emissions in the natural gas transmission and distribution systems at two compressor stations through implementation of a technical program to seal leaking valves. The compressor stations are located in Pallasovka and Saratov, and are named Pallasovskaya and Storozhovka, respectively.

The valves at each compressor station will be sealed in the order of most to least leaky, with the total number of valves sealed dependent on the level of funding for each station. The developers anticipate that all 70 leaking valves at the Pallasovskaya compressor station, and 80 of the 120 leaking valves at the Storozhovka station, will be sealed in January 1998. The technologies employed in the valve sealing program include the Sealweld Corporation's high pressure sealant injection equipment with lubricant sealants and sealant fittings.

6. Cost

(a) Explanation of methodology for calculating cost data

Methodology for Calculating Cost Data


This information is not yet available.

(b) Cost data-Project development

Itemized Project Development Costs
Image

(c) Cost data-Project implementation

Itemized Project Implementation Costs
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7. Monitoring and verification of AIJ project activities and results

Item

Party(ies) that will be monitoring project activities

GAZPROM

Party(ies) that will be externally verifying project results

Southern California Gas Company

Date when the monitoring plan became (or will become) operational (month/year)

September 1998

Types of data that will be collected

Fugitive emissions

Description of Monitoring and Verification Activities and Schedule for Implementation


The project will be monitored through field surveys. The methane emissions from the leaking and sealed valves will be measured directly with monitoring equipment that is available in the North American gas industry, such as the pipe line valve electronic flowrate indicator. Fugitive gas emissions from valve stems and fittings can be determined directly by "bagging" the valve zone. The "bagging" procedure involves placing a bag, typically plastic, over the leaking element of a valve and securing the bag so that all fugitive emissions which vent to the atmosphere are captured in the bag. As the bag fills up to a known volume, the time required to fill the bag is noted and the leakage rate can be determined from these two measurements.

Participants agree to external verification. Southern California Gas Company will perform the verification and has provided preliminary information on their qualifications and their proposed approach which includes:

  • Inspection of the sites to verify that the field practices employed are commensurate with project objectives.
  • Verification of the adequacy of the field data collection and monitoring procedures employed to quantify the benefits derived from the valve sealing program.
  • Verification of the conversion factors used to calculate equivalent CO2 from the volume of CH4 that is captured.
  • Verification of the adequacy of the monitoring plan and use of the data collected to update the greenhouse gas reduction estimates.
  • Identification of potential sources of project "leakage" and verification that the steps identified to reduce potential project "leakage" are reasonable and adequate.

 

Information on the specific schedule for monitoring and verification activities is not yet available.

B. Governmental approval

Item

Please check one of the following.

This report is a first report.

or

This report is an intermediate report.

or

This report is a final report.

Please check one of the following:

This report is a joint report. Letter(s) of approval of this report from the designated national authority of the other Party(ies) involved in the activity is(are) attached in Section J, Annex.

or

This report is a separate report.

Additional comments (if any):

C. Compatibility with, and supportiveness of, national economic development and socioeconomic and environmental priorities and strategies

Compatibility with Economic Development and Socioeconomic and Environmental Priorities


The RUSAGAS project is compatible with the Russian government's desire to enhance environmental quality and improve the efficiency of the energy sector.

D. Environmental, social/cultural, and economic impacts of the AIJ project

Non-Greenhouse-Gas Environmental Impacts of the Project


A potential environmental health benefit of the project is reduced local air pollution.

Social/Cultural Impacts of the Project


By reducing methane leaks, which can cause fires and explosions, the project increases safety at the compressor stations.

Economic Impacts of the Project


A direct cost savings is accrued through the decrease in leakage of gas from the system. In addition to the direct savings from recovering lost gas, operating costs may be reduced, including (1) system maintenance and repair costs resulting from high impurity levels, and (2) the payment of emission fees (GAZPROM must pay a "pollution tax" on emissions of methane, sulfur dioxide, and NOx).

E. Greenhouse gas impacts of the AIJ project

1. Scenario description

Item
Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

1 of 2

Site name/designation

Pallasovka

Project sector

Energy

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

Fugitive natural gas emissions from leaking compressor valves

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

The Pallasovka compressor station is approximately 880 km southeast of Moscow, and 220 km northeast of Volgograd. It has thirty compressor units. Eighteen units are natural gas turbines and twelve units are electric motor driven. It has an estimated maximum transmission capacity of 90 x 109 m3/yr. There are approximately 700 valves associated with the compressor station.

The chief engineer at Pallasovka estimates that approximately 10% of the valves at the compressor station are leaking. When a leaking valve is repaired, the current practice at the plant is not to lubricate the valve but, rather, to cut the valve from the pipe and replace it with a new valve. This is a very costly practice. Furthermore, depending on the location of the valve, a substantial emission of fugitive gases may occur during the cutting and replacement operation. The reference scenario assumes that none of these leaking valves would be replaced over the lifetime of the project.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

Capture of fugitive methane emissions

Description:

The project is implementing a valve sealing program at the Pallasovka compressor station. It is projected that funding will allow for all of the leaking valves (70) to be sealed. Under the valve sealing program, the methane emissions from leaking valves are assumed to be eliminated completely and remain eliminated throughout the lifetime of the project.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Item
Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

2 of 2

Site name/designation

Saratov

Project sector

Energy

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

Fugitive natural gas emissions from leaking compressor valves

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

The Saratov compressor station is approximately 9 km north of the city of Saratov. The compressor station was constructed in the mid-1960s, and is used primarily to pump gas into two large underground storage basins. It has sixteen compressor units. Nine units are natural gas turbines and seven units are electric motor driven. The estimated maximum transmission capacity of the station is 17 x 109 m3/yr. It is estimated that there are 120 leaking valves resulting in methane emissions to the atmosphere. The reference scenario assumes that none of these leaking valves would be replaced over the lifetime of the project.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

Capture of fugitive methane emissions

Description:

The project is implementing a valve sealing program at the Saratov compressor station. It is projected that funding will allow for approximately 80 of the 120 leaking valves to be sealed. Under the valve sealing program, the methane emissions from leaking valves are assumed to be eliminated completely and remain eliminated throughout the lifetime of the project.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

2. GHG emission/sequestration calculation methodology

GHG Emission/Sequestration Calculation Methodology

Site number

1 of 2

Project sector

Energy

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Reference Scenario


The reference scenario for Site 1, the Pallasovka compressor station, is based on the current estimated emissions of methane from leaking valves at the station. It is estimated that there are 70 leaking valves that emit a total of approximately 9.2 x 106 m3 CH4/yr. Based on measurements of 16 leaking valves, the minimum and maximum emissions measured were 15 m3/hr and 1,300 m3/hr, respectively. To be conservative, the lowest emission level of 15 m3/hr is used. Therefore, a leaky valve will produce annual fugitive gas emissions of 131,400 m3 CH4/yr (= 15 m3/hr * 24 hrs/day * 365 days/yr). Total annual emissions are 9.2 x 106 m3 CH4/yr (= 131,400 m3 CH4/yr * 70 valves). To convert from volume to mass, an average density of 700 g/m3 is used (the density of CH4 is 720 g/m3 at 0oC and 1 atm; and 670 g/m3 at 20oC and 1 atm). Thus, Site 1 reference scenario annual emissions are estimated to be 6,440 t CH4 (= 9.2 x 106 m3 CH4/yr * .0007 t/m3).

Expert assessment has determined that without intervention the emission levels could increase up to 5% per year. However, to be conservative, no increase is assumed and, therefore, reference scenario emissions remain constant throughout the life of the project.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Project Scenario


In the project scenario, emissions are reduced by repairing valves at the compressor station. Repaired valves have zero emissions. At Pallasovka, it is projected that all of the leaking valves (70) are sealed, resulting in zero project scenario emissions throughout the life of the project.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Actual Project


This information is not yet available.

GHG Emission/Sequestration Calculation Methodology

Site number

2 of 2

Project sector

Energy

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Reference Scenario


The reference scenario for Site 2, the Saratov compressor station, is based on the current estimated emissions of methane from leaking valves at the station. It is estimated that there are 120 leaking valves, emitting approximately 94 x 106 m3 CH4/yr (the head environmental engineer for the Saratov station estimated that the fugitive gas emissions at the station were in the range of 0.5 - 0.6 % of the maximum gas transmission capacity of the compressor station; the average is equivalent to 94 x 106 m3 CH4/yr). To convert from volume to mass, an average density of 700 g/m3 is used (the density of CH4 is 720 g/m3 at 0oC and 1 atm; and 670 g/m3 at 20oC and 1 atm). Thus, Site 2 reference scenario annual emissions are estimated to be 65,800 t CH4 (= 94 x 106 m3 CH4/yr * .0007 t/m3).

Expert assessment has determined that without intervention the emission levels could increase up to 5% per year. However, to be conservative, no increase is assumed and, therefore, reference scenario emissions remain constant throughout the life of the project.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Project Scenario


In the project scenario, emissions are reduced by repairing valves at the compressor station. Repaired valves have zero emissions. At Saratov, it is estimated that 80 of the 120 leaking valves are sealed, resulting in emissions of 31 x106 m3 CH4/yr (= 40/120 * 94 x 106 m3 CH4/yr) from the 40 remaining leaking valves. Thus, Site 2 project scenario annual emissions are equivalent to 21,700 t CH4 (= 31 x106 m3 CH4/yr * 0.0007 t/m3). The project scenario emissions remain constant throughout the life of the project.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Actual Project


This information is not yet available.

3. GHG emission/sequestration data

(a) Reporting of GHG emissions/sequestrationImageImage

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(b) Additional information on GHG emissions/sequestration

Indirect or Secondary GHG Impacts (Positive and Negative)


This information is not yet available.

Factors That Could Cause the Future Loss or Reversal of GHG Benefits


Given the nature of this projectcapture of CH4 at compressor valves that would have leaked to the atmosphere otherwiseloss or reversal of benefits accrued will not be possible. However, there is some risk that inadequate maintenance will diminish the effectiveness of the valve sealing program over time which would result in the projected GHG reduction benefits not being achieved.

Strategy for Reducing the Risk of Future Loss or Reversal of GHG Benefits


The monitoring and evaluation plans that are part of the project will keep track of the program's effectiveness. In addition, participants have included provisions for training in operations, maintenance, and repair. The proposal also notes that once the valves have been initially cleaned and sealed, they will only require a small quantity of additional lubricant/sealant to be injected upon a scheduled basis which will result in a negligible cost to GAZPROM.

F. Funding of the AIJ project

1. Identification of funding sources

(a) Funding sources for project development

 

Funding Source

 

Country of
Funding Source

 

Amount
($US)
Percent
of Total
Funding
(%)

SDTC

U.S.A.

Sealweld Corp.

U.S.A.

20,000

67%

GAZPROM

Russian Federation

OSU/USEPA

U.S.A.

10,000

33%

Total

30,000

100

Note: SDTC, Sealweld Corp., and GAZPROM contributed staff time of professionals in their respective organizations equal to approximately $20,000 (no cash contributions).

(b) Funding sources for project implementation

 

Funding Source

 

Country of
Funding Source

 

Amount
($US)
Percent
of Total
Funding
(%)
Is This Funding Assured? (Y/N)

Unidentified utility investor

U.S.A.

162,500

100%
N

Total

162,500

100

2. Assessment of additional funding needs

Current or Planned Activities to Obtain Additional Funding


Dr. Vinson will explore the opportunities for financing the project with Ex-Im Bank and with other financial agencies.

G. Contribution to capacity building and technology transfer

Contribution to Capacity Building and Technology Transfer


The project will demonstrate GHG capture, energy efficiency, and energy saving techniques that are cost effective and credible in the Russian Federation. There is great need and potential to implement valve sealing programs across the Russian Federation; hence RUSAGAS serves as a model for this type of activity.

H. Recent developments, technical difficulties, and obstacles encountered

Recent Project Developments


This information is not yet available.

Technical Difficulties and Other Obstacles Encountered


This information is not yet available.

I. Additional information

Additional Information


This information is not yet available.

J. Annex

1. Host country acceptance of the AIJ project

 

Country/Project Title
Name, Title, and Government Agency
of the Designated
National Authority

 

Date of Approval
(day/month/year)

Russian Federation / RUSAGAS: Fugitive Gas Capture Project

Alexander I. Bedritsky, Head of Roshydromet, Chairman of the Interagency Commission of the Russian Federation on Climate Change Problems, Russian Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring

9 December 1995

2. Letters of approval of this AIJ project report

See attached concurrence form.


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