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ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTED JOINTLY (AIJ)
 
USIJI Uniform Reporting Document:
Activities Implemented Jointly Under the Pilot Phase

List of Projects

A. Description of the AIJ project

1. Title of project: RUSAFOR-Saratov Afforestation Project

2. Host country: Russian Federation

3. Brief project description:

The Russian Federation/USA Forestry and Climate Change Project-Saratov Afforestation Project (RUSAFOR-SAP) was conceived as a Russian-American forest carbon offset joint implementation demonstration project. The purpose of the project is to evaluate the biological, operational, and institutional opportunities to manage a Russian forest plantation as a carbon sink. The project established plantations on four sites in the Russian Federation, totaling 900 hectares. The sites were composed of marginal agricultural land and previously burned forest stands. Greenhouse gas benefits accrue from avoided carbon dioxide emissions (due to avoided soil erosion and biomass decay), and from carbon sequestration (due to tree growth and soil carbon accumulation).

4. Participants:

Name of Organization or Individual

Country

Saratov Forest Management District (Russian Federal Forest Service) (SFMD-RFFS)

Russian Federation

International Forestry Institute, Moscow Branch (IFI/M)

Russian Federation

International Forestry Institute, Volga Regional Branch (IFI/VRB)

Russian Federation

Oregon State University (OSU)

U.S.A.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

U.S.A.

Sustainable Development Technology Corporation (SDTC)

U.S.A.

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Name of organization (English)

Saratov Forest Management District (Russian Federal Forest Service)

Acronym (original language)

Acronym (English)

SFMD (RFFS)

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project development, project administration, financing, monitoring

Street

Lunnaya Street 27

City

Saratov

State

Post code

410065

Country

Russian Federation

Telephone

7-845-2-13-13-75

Fax

E-mail

office@les.saratov.su

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Melchnikov

First name, middle name

Anatoly S.

Job title

Director

Direct telephone

7-845-2-13-13-75

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

office@les.saratov.su

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Name of organization (English)

International Forestry Institute, Moscow Branch

Acronym (original language)

Acronym (English)

IFI/M

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project development, technical assistance, financing, verification

Street

Novocherimuskinskaya Str., 69

City

Moscow

State

Post code

117418

Country

Russian Federation

Telephone

Fax

E-mail

postmast@spepl.msk.su

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Korovin

First name, middle name

Gregory

Job title

Deputy Director

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

Petrochenkova

First name, middle name

Elena V.

Job title

Head of International Department

Direct telephone

7-095-332-21-13

Direct fax

7-095-332-29-17

Direct e-mail

postmast@spepl.msk.su

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Name of organization (English)

International Forestry Institute, Volga Regional Branch

Acronym (original language)

Acronym (English)

IFI/VRB

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project development, project administration, financing, verification

Street

Naberezhnaya Kosmonavtov, 2-39

City

Saratov

State

Post code

410002

Country

Russian Federation

Telephone

Fax

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Kravtsov

First name, middle name

Sergei Z.

Job title

Director

Direct telephone

7-845-26-44-82

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Oregon State University

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

OSU

Acronym (English)

(Same as above)

Department

Civil Engineering

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project development, financing, monitoring

Street

202 Apperson Hall, Room 107

City

Corvallis

State

Oregon

Post code

97331

Country

U.S.A.

Telephone

Fax

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Vinson

First name, middle name

Ted S.

Job title

Professor

Direct telephone

541-737-3494

Direct fax

541-737-3052

Direct e-mail

vinsont@ccmail.orst.edu

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

Kolchugina

First name, middle name

Tatyana P.

Job title

Research Associate

Direct telephone

541-737-6156

Direct fax

541-737-3052

Direct e-mail

kolchugt@ccmail.orst.edu

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

EPA

Acronym (English)

(Same as above)

Department

Climate Policy & Programs Division, Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project development

Street

401 M Street, SW

City

Washington

State

District of Columbia

Post code

20460

Country

U.S.A.

Telephone

202-260-8825

Fax

202-260-6405

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Andrasko

First name, middle name

Kenneth

Job title

Chief, Forest/Agriculture Section

Direct telephone

202-586-3179

Direct fax

202-586-3485, 202-586-3486

Direct e-mail

andrasko.ken@epamail.epa.gov

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Sustainable Development Technology Corporation, Inc.

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

SDTC

Acronym (English)

(Same as above)

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project development, liaison, monitoring, marketing

Street

3930 NW Witham Hill Drive, Suite M116

City

Corvallis

State

Oregon

Post code

97330

Country

U.S.A.

Telephone

541-737-6156

Fax

541-737-3052

E-mail

kolchugt@ccmail.orst.edu

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

Kolchugina

First name, middle name

Tatyana P.

Job title

President

Direct telephone

541-737-6156

Direct fax

541-737-3052

Direct e-mail

kolchugt@ccmail.orst.edu

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

5. Description of AIJ project activities

Item

Type of Project

Sector(s)

Land-use change and forestry

Primary activity(ies)

Sites I & II: Afforestation;

Sites III & IV: Reforestation

Project Location

Country

Russian Federation

Exact location (city, state, region)

Dergachevskyi Raion, Saratov Oblast;

Lysogorskyi Raion, Saratov Oblast

Key Dates and Current Stage of Project

Project starting date (month/year)

October 1993

Project ending date (month/year)

April 2034 for Sites I & II; September 2053 for Sites III & IV

Project lifetime (years)

Sites I & II: 40 years; Sites III & IV: 60 years

Current stage of project

In progress

General Project Description and Technical Data


This project is designed to evaluate the biological, operational, and institutional opportunities to manage a Russian forest plantation as a carbon sink. Under the project, 450 hectares (ha) of marginal agricultural lands were afforested with broadleaf (i.e. green ash, box elder, and elm) seedlings in Sites I and II, and 450 ha of burned pine plantation were reforested with pine seedlings in Sites III and IV. The lands are situated in the Saratov Oblast, 440 miles southeast of Moscow.

These sites will be developed as plantations. The agreement between the participants details responsibilities for project activities including seedling protection; plantation maintenance; replanting and re-establishment in the event of loss to fire, disease, or insects; and carbon sequestration projection. At the conclusion of the project, the commercial timber may be harvested at the discretion of SFMD. The harvested timber will only be used for residential and commercial construction, wherein the timber will be preserved for 100 years or more. Non-commercial timber and slash debris may be used as a biomass fuel substitute for fossil fuels in energy or heating systems. However, Sites I and II have been designated as a Regional Park and a Soil Erosion Protection Area; Sites III and IV have been designated as a Soil Erosion Protection Area. Consequently, the likelihood that any of these sites will be harvested in the future is very low.

6. Cost

(a) Explanation of methodology for calculating cost data

Methodology for Calculating Cost Data


The total estimated project costs include costs for (1) site preparation, seedling planting, plantation maintenance and preservation, (2) facilitating arrangements with various ministries in Moscow and meetings that are required in Moscow, (3) preparation of all necessary reports for the project and facilitation of meetings of the partners in Saratov, and (4) travel and compensation for external verification, future monitoring, and participation in USIJI meetings and workshops.

(b) Cost data-Project development

Itemized Project Development Costs

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(c) Cost data-Project implementation

Itemized Project Implementation Costs

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7. Monitoring and verification of AIJ project activities and results

Item

Party(ies) that will be monitoring project activities

Russian Federal Forest Service

Party(ies) that will be externally verifying project results

USIJI Evaluation Panel, its designee, or a party(ies) to be named at a later date by the project participants.

Date when the monitoring plan became (or will become) operational (month/year)

October 1998

Types of data that will be collected

Tree survival, stocking density, growth rate, and other data (to be determined)

Description of Monitoring and Verification Activities and Schedule for Implementation


For the purpose of monitoring, 53 fifty-three sampling plots were established at the project sites. In the future, measurements of relevant variables will be taken regularly, including stocking densities, tree heights, stem diameters, ratios of aboveground to below ground biomass, and soil carbon contents. These measurements will be used to regularly update projections of project greenhouse gas benefits.

All participants have agreed to external verification to ensure emissions reductions.

B. Governmental approval

Item

Please check one of the following.

This report is a first report.

or

This report is an intermediate report.

or

This report is a final report.

Please check one of the following:

This report is a joint report. Letter(s) of approval of this report from the designated national authority of the other Party(ies) involved in the activity is(are) attached in Section J, Annex.

or

This report is a separate report.

Additional comments (if any):

C. Compatibility with, and supportiveness of, national economic development and socioeconomic and environmental priorities and strategies

Compatibility with Economic Development and Socioeconomic and Environmental Priorities


The RUSAFOR project is compatible with the Russian government's desire to enhance environmental quality.

D. Environmental, social/cultural, and economic impacts of the AIJ project

Non-Greenhouse-Gas Environmental Impacts of the Project


In addition to sequestering carbon dioxide, the project will also reduce soil erosion, enhance soil nutrient content, and provide habitat for vertebrate and insect species. There are no negative impacts associated with the project.

Social/Cultural Impacts of the Project


The participants have found that, regardless of whether the project will have an economic impact on the surrounding area, it has become a source of pride for the nearby communities. The commitment of the communities in and around the sites to the project provides an additional level of stewardship, enhancing formal monitoring and risk reduction activities conducted as part of the project plan.

Economic Impacts of the Project


Although the technology transfer associated with the project has been minimal regarding forestry issues, the project has made significant progress in advancing the thinking of the Russian partners to the free enterprise system and capitalism.

E. Greenhouse gas impacts of the AIJ project

1. Scenario description

Item

Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

1 of 4

Site name/designation

Site I

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

Cattle raising

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

Site I is a 210 ha parcel which was formerly marginal agricultural land. It has been used as rangeland and was never forested. Without the project, this land use is projected to continue, with related CO2 emissions resulting from soil erosion.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

Afforestation

Description:

The project developer expected that the site would be afforested with broadleaf (i.e. green ash, box elder, and elm) seedlings. In addition, the project developer anticipated that the site would be managed as a plantation for 40 years, after which commercial timber would potentially be harvested for the production of construction materials. Twenty permanent sampling plots were expected to be established to support future monitoring activities.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

Afforestation

Description:

The 210 ha project site has been afforested with broadleaf (i.e., green ash, box elder, and elm) seedlings. The site will be managed as a plantation for 40 years, after which commercial timber may be harvested for the production of construction materials. However, the site has been designated as a Regional Park and a Soil Erosion Protection Area. Consequently, the likelihood that the stands will be harvested in the future is very low. Twenty permanent sampling plots were established to support future monitoring activities.

Item

Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

2 of 4

Site name/designation

Site II

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

Cattle raising

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

Site II is a 240 ha parcel which was formerly marginal agricultural land. It has been used as rangeland and was never forested. Without the project, this land use is projected to continue, with related CO2 emissions resulting from soil erosion.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

Afforestation

Description:

The project developer expected that the site would be afforested with broadleaf (i.e., green ash, box elder, and elm) seedlings. The developer anticipated that the site would be managed as a plantation for 40 years, after which commercial timber would potentially be harvested for the production of construction materials. Twenty-seven permanent sampling plots were expected to be established to support future monitoring activities.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

Afforestation

Description:

The 240 ha project site has been afforested with broadleaf (i.e., green ash, box elder, and elm) seedlings. The site will be managed as a plantation for 40 years, after which commercial timber may be harvested for the production of construction materials. However, the site has been designated as a Regional Park and a Soil Erosion Protection Area. Consequently, the likelihood that the stands will be harvested in the future is very low. Twenty-seven permanent sampling plots were established to support future monitoring activities.

Item

Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

3 of 4

Site name/designation

Site III

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

None (burned forest)

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

Site III is an area of intense soil erosion that was afforested approximately 30 years ago. A fire burned down the forest on the project site and in the surrounding area in 1992. Without the project, the land is projected to remain idle, and 90% of the residual post-burning plant biomass remaining on the site is projected to decay over a 60 year period.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

Reforestation

Description:

In the first year of the project, salvageable coarse woody debris on Site III was anticipated to be collected and used for long-term construction purposes while remaining woody debris was anticipated to be burned on-site to prepare it for reforestation. The site was expected to be planted with pine seedlings and managed as a plantation over the lifetime of the project. At the end of the project, commercial timber may be harvested for the production of construction materials. Six permanent sampling plots were expected to be established to support future monitoring activities.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

Reforestation

Description:

In the first year of the project, salvageable coarse woody debris on Site III was collected and used in long-term construction applications; the remaining woody debris was burned on-site to prepare it for reforestation. The 50 ha site was planted with pine seedlings and will be managed as a plantation over the lifetime of the project. At the end of the project, commercial timber may be harvested for the production of construction materials. However, the site has been designated as a Soil Erosion Protection Area. Consequently, the likelihood that the stands will be harvested in the future is very low. Six permanent sampling plots were established to support future monitoring activities.

Item

Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

4 of 4

Site name/designation

Site IV

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

None (burned forest)

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

Site IV is an 400 ha area of intense soil erosion that was afforested approximately 30 years ago. A fire burned down the forest on the project site and in the surrounding area in 1992. Without the project, the land is projected to remain idle, and 90% of the residual post-burning plant biomass remaining on the site is projected to decay over a 60 year period.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

Reforestation

Description:

In the first year of the project, salvageable coarse woody debris on Site IV was anticipated to be collected and used for long-term construction purposes while remaining woody debris was expected to be burned on-site to prepare it for reforestation. The site was expected to be planted with pine seedlings and managed as a plantation over the lifetime of the project. At the end of the project, commercial timber may be harvested for the production of construction materials. Forty permanent sampling plots were expected to be established to support future monitoring activities.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

Reforestation

Description:

In the first year of the project, salvageable coarse woody debris on Site IV was collected and used in long-term construction applications; the remaining woody debris was burned on-site to prepare it for reforestation. The 400 ha site was planted with pine seedlings and will be managed as a plantation over the lifetime of the project. At the end of the project, commercial timber may be harvested for the production of construction materials. However, the site has been designated as a Soil Erosion Protection Area. Consequently, the likelihood that the stands will be harvested in the future is very low. The reforestation at Site IV was undertaken at the expense of SFMD-RFFS on speculation that, in the future, the carbon sequestered at the site would have monetary value that would more than offset their costs to reforest the area. But for the consideration of the future monetary value of the sequestered carbon, reforestation of this 400 ha parcel would not have occurred.

2. GHG emission/sequestration calculation methodology

GHG Emission/Sequestration Calculation Methodology

Site number

1 & 2 of 4

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Reference Scenario


Emissions in the reference case result from loss of soil carbon due to soil erosion on the 450 ha of marginal agricultural lands that make up Sites I and II. The project developers assume a constant rate of soil carbon loss of 0.10 t C/ha-yr over the lifetime of the project. They also assume that there will be no reforestation or land-use change at the project area. Therefore, total annual reference case emissions for Sites I and II are estimated to be 45 t C (= 0.10 t C/ha-yr * 450 ha).

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Project Scenario


In the project case, afforestation of Sites I and II averts reference scenario emissions from soil erosion and results in carbon sequestration in biomass soils. The carbon sequestration estimates were derived from annual estimates of stemwood biomass growth, expansion factors to account for total phytomass and litter, and annual soil carbon accumulation rates. Because biomass growth tables for the broadleaf species that were planted are not available for the region, stemwood biomass growth rates were derived from growth data for broadleaf stands from other regions with similar climatic conditions. Expansion factors and soil carbon accumulation rates were based on published values from forestry research in the Volga and Central Regions of Russia.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Actual Project


This information will be available after the first field monitoring is completed.

GHG Emission/Sequestration Calculation Methodology

Site number

3 of 4

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Reference Scenario


The project area is comprised of 50 ha of burned forest lands in Site III. Emissions in the reference case arise from the decay of post-fire residual stem and non-stem coarse woody debris (CWD). The project developers assume that there will be no reforestation or land-use change in the project area and that 90% of the CWD decomposes at a constant rate over the project life of 60 years. The total initial carbon stock at the start of the project is 1775 t C (= 71 t of plant biomass/ha * 0.5 t of C per t of plant biomass * 50 ha). Therefore, the average annual carbon emissions are estimated to be 27 t C/yr (= [1775 t C * 0.9] / 60 yr).

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Project Scenario


In the project scenario in Site III, carbon dioxide emissions result from burning of non-stem CWD and long-term decay of stem CWD, and carbon sequestration results from tree growth and soil carbon accumulation over the lifetime of the project. The non-stem CWD is burned on-site in year 1 to prepare the soil for reforestation. Emissions from this activity are derived from an estimate of the non-stem CWD stock present on the site (517.13). The developers assume that 100% of this carbon is emitted as CO2. The stem CWD is expected to be salvaged and used for long-term construction purposes. The developer projects that this stem CWD will decompose in 100 years (instead of 60 years, as in the reference case), thereby releasing CO2 at an average annual rate of 12.5 t C (= [25 t C/ha * 50 ha] / 100 yr).

Expansion factors to account for total phytomass and litter, as well as soil carbon accumulation rates, were based on published values from forestry research in the Russian Federation.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Actual Project


This information will be available after the first field monitoring is completed.

GHG Emission/Sequestration Calculation Methodology

Site number

4 of 4

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Reference Scenario


The project area is comprised of 400 ha of burned forest lands on Site IV. Emissions in the reference scenario arise from the decay of post-fire residual stem and non-stem coarse woody debris (CWD). The project developers assume that there will be no reforestation or land-use change in the project area and that 90% of the CWD decomposes at a constant rate over the project life of 60 years. The total initial carbon stock at the start of the project is 14,200 t C (= 71 t of plant biomass/ha * 0.5 t of C per t of plant biomass * 400 ha). Therefore, the average annual carbon emissions are estimated to be 213 t C/yr (= [14,200 t C * 0.9] / 60 yr).

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Project Scenario


In the project scenario on Site IV, carbon dioxide emissions result from burning of non-stem CWD and long-term decay of stem CWD, and carbon sequestration results from tree growth and soil carbon accumulation over the lifetime of the project. The non-stem CWD is burned on-site in year 1 to prepare the soil for reforestation. Emissions from this activity are derived from an estimate of the non-stem CWD stock present on the site (4200 t C). The developers assume that 100% of this carbon is emitted as CO2. The stem CWD is expected to be salvaged and used for long-term construction purposes. The developer projects that this stem CWD will decompose in 100 years (instead of 60 years, as in the reference case), thereby releasing CO2 at an average annual rate of 100 t C (= [25 t C/ha * 400 ha] / 100 yr).

Expansion factors to account for total phytomass and litter, as well as soil carbon accumulation rates, were based on published values from forestry research in the Russian Federation.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Actual Project


This information will be available after the first field monitoring is completed.

3. GHG emission/sequestration data

(a) Reporting of GHG emissions/sequestration

 

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(b) Additional information on GHG emissions/sequestration

Indirect or Secondary GHG Impacts (Positive and Negative)


No indirect or secondary GHG impacts associated with the project have been identified.

Factors That Could Cause the Future Loss or Reversal of GHG Benefits


The following factors could damage the plantations and cause GHG emission reductions and/or sequestration to be lost or reversed in future years: drought, frost, weeds, foraging animals, insects, infestation, wind and water erosion, fire, and other unanticipated anthropogenic disturbances.

Strategy for Reducing the Risk of Future Loss or Reversal of GHG Benefits


Measures are being taken to reduce risk from drought, frost, weeds, and disease, and replanting will occur in the event of loss or destruction of seedlings. Sites I, II, and III are physically separated from each other by sufficient distance such that damage to a given plantation is not likely to affect another. Therefore, the risk of losing all benefits of the project in future is reduced. At the conclusion of the project, the commercial timber may be harvested at the discretion of SFMD. However, the harvested timber will only be used for residential and commercial construction, wherein the timber will be preserved for 100 years or more. Non-commercial timber and slash debris may be used as a biomass fuel substitute for fossil fuels in energy or heating systems.

F. Funding of the AIJ project

1. Identification of funding sources

(a) Funding sources for project development

Funding Source

Country ofFunding Source

Amount($US)

Percent of Total Funding(%)

Oregon State University

U.S.A.

4,500

41

Russian Federal Forest Service

Russian Federation

4,500

41

International Forestry Institute

Russian Federation

2,000

18

Total

11,000

100

(b) Funding sources for project implementation

Funding Source

Country of Funding Source

Amount($US)

Percent of Total Funding(%)

Is This Funding Assured? (Y/N)

Oregon State University

U.S.A.

50,000

45

Y

Russian Federal Forest Service

Russian Federation

50,000

45

Y

International Forestry Institute

Russian Federation

5,000

5

Y

International Forestry Institute/Volga Regional Branch

Russian Federation

5,000

5

Y

Total

110,000

100

2. Assessment of additional funding needs

Current or Planned Activities to Obtain Additional Funding


The project developers have requested the USIJI Secretariat to provide additional funding for expenses related to monitoring, external verification, and participation in USIJI workshops and meetings.

G. Contribution to capacity building and technology transfer

Contribution to Capacity Building and Technology Transfer


The project facilitated institutional strengthening in the areas of project development and structuring (e.g., precise statement of the obligations of each of the partners, deliverable requirements, payment schedule, anticipation of future interactions beyond the time-frame of the agreement) through the agreements that were negotiated between the project participants.

H. Recent developments, technical difficulties, and obstacles encountered

Recent Project Developments


Fifty-three permanent sampling plots were established on three project sites. An initial survey of seedling survival and stocking density was conducted. Sustainable Development Technology Corporation is the marketing representative for RUSAFOR.

Technical Difficulties and Other Obstacles Encountered


No technical difficulties have been encountered. The project has received strong support and encouragement from the Russian government.

I. Additional information

Additional Information


An additional 400 ha of pine seedlings were planted in the general vicinity of Site III by the Saratov Forest Management District - Russian Federal Forest Service for the purpose of investigating potential carbon offsets and monetary benefits. These 400 ha should be considered part of the RUSAFOR project, as their addition was inspired by the concept of AIJ. A spreadsheet that supports the carbon offsets associated with these additional 400 ha is included in the attached tables. As a result of this addition, the RUSAFOR project should be considered a 900 ha site. One hundred percent of the total emission reductions for the additional 400 ha parcel should be credited to the Russian Federal Forest Service.

J. Annex

1. Host country acceptance of the AIJ project

Country/Project Title

Name, Title, and Government Agency of the Designated National Authority

Date of Approval(day/month/year)

Russian Federation/RUSAFOR-Saratov Afforestation Project

P.F. Barsukov, First Deputy Director, Federal Service, Russian Federal Forest Service

21 October 1994


V.G. Zhiboedov, Board Member, Ministry of Environmental Protection and Nature, Russian Federation

24 October 1994

2. Letters of approval of this AIJ project report

See attached concurrence form.


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