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ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTED JOINTLY (AIJ)
 
USIJI Uniform Reporting Document:
Activities Implemented Jointly Under the Pilot Phase

List of Projects

A. Description of the AIJ project

1. Title of project: Scolel Té: Carbon Sequestration and Sustainable Forest Management in Chiapas

2. Host country: Mexico

3. Brief project description:

Scolel Té is a forestry and land-use project located in northeast Chiapas, Mexico. This project will assist farmers primarily in nine Mayan indigenous communities located in highland and lowland ecoregions with developing small agroforestry and forestry enterprises. The greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits of the project accrue from forest growth (i.e., carbon sequestration) that would not have occurred in the absence of project activities. In addition to reducing forest degradation and conversion to agriculture and improving the sustainability of local farming systems, this project is expected to contribute to the social and economic welfare of these communities as well as the preservation of the region's rich biodiversity.

4. Participants:

Name of Organization or Individual

Country

El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR)

Mexico

Unión de Crédito Agropecuario e Industrial de los Estados de Chiapas y Oaxaca, Pajal Ya Kac'Tic S.A. de C.V. (Unión de Crédito Pajal)

Mexico

American Forests

U.S.A.

Econergy International Corporation (EIC)

U.S.A.

Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC)

Multilateral

University of Edinburgh

Scotland

International Energy Agency (IEA)

England

UK Darwin Initiative

UK Overseas Development Administration Forestry Research Program

Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA)/Fédération Internationale Pour l'Isolement du Carbone (FIPIC)

Belgium/France

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

El Colegio de la Frontera Sur

Name of organization (English)

Acronym (original language)

ECOSUR

Acronym (English)

(Same as above)

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project development, technical assistance, monitoring/verification

Street

City

San Cristóbal de las Casas

State

Chiapas

Post code

29200

Country

Mexico

Telephone

Fax

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

de Jong

First name, middle name

Ben

Job title

Direct telephone

52-967-81883

Direct fax

52-967-82322

Direct e-mail

bjong@sclc.ecosur.mx

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Unión de Crédito Agropecuario e Industrial de los Estados de Chiapas y Oaxaca, Pajal Ya Kac'Tic S.A. de C.V. (Unión de Crédito Pajal)

Name of organization (English)

Acronym (original language)

Acronym (English)

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project implementation, financing, technical assistance

Street

Av. Pantaléon de Domínguez #40

City

San Cristóbal de las Casas

State

Chiapas

Post code

29500

Country

Mexico

Telephone

Fax

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

Taylor

First name, middle name

John

Job title

Direct telephone

52-967-82295

Direct fax

52-967-82295

Direct e-mail

pajal@sclc.ecosur.mx

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

American Forests

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

None

Acronym (English)

(Same as above)

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Financing

Street

1516 P Street NW

City

Washington

State

District of Columbia

Post code

20005

Country

U.S.A.

Telephone

Fax

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

Di Nicola

First name, middle name

Tony

Job title

Direct telephone

202-955-4500

Direct fax

202-667-7751

Direct e-mail

dinicola@amfor.org

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Econergy International Corporation

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

EIC

Acronym (English)

(Same as above)

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Financing

Street

1925 K Street NW, Suite 230

City

Washington

State

District of Columbia

Post code

20006

Country

U.S.A.

Telephone

Fax

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

Moscarella

First name, middle name

John Paul

Job title

Direct telephone

202-965-6177

Direct fax

202-965-6049

Direct e-mail

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Commission for Environmental Cooperation

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

CEC

Acronym (English)

(Same as above)

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Financing

Street

City

State

Post code

Country

Telephone

Fax

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

http://www.cec.org

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

University of Edinburgh

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

None

Acronym (English)

None

Department

Institute of Ecology and Resource Management

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Project development, project administration, technical assistance

Street

Darwin Building, Mayfield Road

City

Edinburgh

State

Post code

EH9 3JU

Country

Scotland

Telephone

Fax

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

Tipper

First name, middle name

Richard

Job title

Direct telephone

44-131-650-5422

Direct fax

44-131-662-0478

Direct e-mail

Richard.Tipper@ed.ac.uk

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

International Energy Agency

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

IEA

Acronym (English)

(Same as above)

Department

Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Financing

Street

CRE Stoke Orchard

City

Cheltenham

State

Post code

GL52 4RZ

Country

England

Telephone

Fax

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

Ormerod

First name, middle name

Bill

Job title

Direct telephone

44-1242-680753

Direct fax

44-1242-680758

Direct e-mail

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

UK Darwin Initiative

Name of organization (English)

Acronym (original language)

Acronym (English)

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Financing

Street

City

State

Post code

Country

Telephone

Fax

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

UK Overseas Development Administration Forestry Research Program

Name of organization (English)

(Same as above)

Acronym (original language)

FRP

Acronym (English)

(Same as above)

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Financing

Street

City

State

Post code

Country

Telephone

Fax

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Item

Organization

Name of organization (original language)

or

Name of individual if unaffiliated with any organization

Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile/Fédération Internationale Pour l'Isolement du Carbone

Name of organization (English)

International Automobile Federation/International Carbon Sequestration Federation

Acronym (original language)

FIA/FIPIC

Acronym (English)

IAF/ICSF

Department

Function(s) within the AIJ project activities

Financing

Street

City

State

Post code

Country

Belgium/France

Telephone

Fax

E-mail

World Wide Web-URL address

Administrative Officer Responsible for the Project

Surname

First name, middle name

Job title

Direct telephone

Direct fax

Direct e-mail

Contact Person for AIJ Activities (if different from the Administrative Officer)

Surname

Ward

First name, middle name

David

Job title

Direct telephone

322-282-0810

Direct fax

322-280-0744

Direct e-mail

5. Description of AIJ project activities

Item

Type of Project

Sector(s)

Land-use change and forestry

Primary activity(ies)

Agroforestry, reforestation, sustainable harvesting, silviculture

Project Location

Country

Mexico

Exact location (city, state, region)

The Tzeltal (lowland) and Tojolobal (highland) regions of northeast Chiapas, a southern state bordering Guatemala, and additional areas yet to be identified

Key Dates and Current Stage of Project

Project starting date (month/year)

June 1997

Project ending date (month/year)

May 2027

Project lifetime (years)

30

Current stage of project

In progress

General Project Description and Technical Data


Scolel Té (which means "growing trees" in Tzeltal and Tojolobal) is a forestry and land-use project that will assist farmers primarily in nine Mayan indigenous communities with developing small agroforestry and forestry enterprises. The objective of the project is to promote carbon sequestration and sustainable farming practices by providing local farmers with technical assistance and financial incentives to shift from agriculture to agroforestry, convert pastures to plantations, restore degraded forest, and better manage natural forest. The carbon benefits generated by these enterprises are expected to range from a minimum of 55,000 metric tonnes (t) of CO2 (15,000 t C) up to 1.21 million t CO2 (330,000 t C), depending on funding. In addition, this project is expected to contribute to the social and economic welfare of these communities as well as the preservation of the region's rich biodiversity.

Approximately 75% of the project's inputs will be directed to five Tzeltal (lowland Mayan) villages located at about 800 meters (m) above sea level and located in the municipality of Chilón, and four Tojolobal (highland Mayan) villages located at about 1,500 m above sea level and split between the municipalities of Comitán and Las Margaritas. The remaining 25% of the project's inputs will be directed to other groups that have yet to be identified. The area of the nine participating villages totals 13,289 hectares (ha), of which 41% is forest, 26% is used for maize, 14% is fallow, 7% is pasture, 4% is used for coffee, and 9% is used for other purposes. Of the 13,289 ha, approximately 2,000 ha will be involved in the Scolel Té project, with 400 ha located in the Tzeltal region and 1,600 ha located in the Tojolobal region. Within each region, the project area will be split evenly between agroforestry and other forest/land management projects. An additional 400 ha will be added to the project area as other participants are identified.

The project's pilot phase will last three years, during which time local farmers will develop and register their own land management plans and begin to receive technical and financial assistance. The land that is registered during the three-year pilot phase will accrue carbon benefits for the ensuing 27 years. The sale of "proto-carbon credits" in anticipation of these carbon benefits will be used to finance implementation of the project, which will eventually become self-sustaining.

6. Cost

(a) Explanation of methodology for calculating cost data

Methodology for Calculating Cost Data


As part of the research and development activities for this project, the project team developed a cost model to derive carbon sequestration costs as a function of land use and biomass growth rates. This model incorporates multiple factors for each land-use type, including (1) site quality and expected wood production, (2) capital and recurrent costs of implementation (e.g., establishment, maintenance, silvicultural treatments, and harvesting), (3) opportunity costs of land and labor diverted to forestry/agroforestry, and (4) potential income from forestry/agroforestry products. Discount rates are applied to the costs. The project's target mean cost is US$10/t C.

The exact project costs will be dependent upon the nature of the land-use projects, which have yet to be developed. In the proposal, the project developer provided estimated costs for agroforestry and plantation projects ranging from US$2.32/t C-ha (live fence) to US$3.98/t C-ha (enriched fallow) for the Tzeltal region, and US$2.50/t C-ha (live fence) to US$11.15/t C-ha (plantation) for the Tojolobal region. These cost estimates are based upon an intermediate level of production intensity and a discount rate of 5%. By raising the discount rate to 10%, these cost estimates shift to US$1.84/t C-ha to US$2.71/t C-ha for the Tzeltal region, and US$1.47/t C-ha to US$8.89/t C-ha for the Tojolobal region, respectively.

(b) Cost data-Project development

Itemized Project Development Costs

Image

(c) Cost data-Project implementation

This information is not yet available.

7. Monitoring and verification of AIJ project activities and results

Item

Party(ies) that will be monitoring project activities

(1) Participating farmers, (2) a technical team composed of trained professionals and local promoters, and (3) a research team composed of researchers from ECOSUR and the University of Edinburgh

Party(ies) that will be externally verifying project results

This information is not yet available.

Date when the monitoring plan became (or will become) operational (month/year)

This information is not yet available.

Types of data that will be collected

Biomass density, biomass growth rate, tree species and age class, soil carbon content, documentation of land ownership and approval of forest plans, participation of women and impact of projects on women, comparative economic productivity, biological diversity, impact on water quality and watershed integrity, and availability and affordability of technical training

Description of Monitoring and Verification Activities and Schedule for Implementation


Three groups will conduct monitoring and verification activities: farmers, the technical team, and the research team. The participating farmers will be responsible for reporting the performance of their individual projects; these reports will serve as the basis for the payment of annuities to the farmers. The technical team, composed of trained professionals and local promoters, will be responsible for (1) evaluating the proposed projects, (2) training farmers to implement the projects and record the performance of their projects, (3) estimating the carbon fluxes for each project, and (4) assessing overall project impacts. The research team, composed of researchers from ECOSUR and the University of Edinburgh, will (1) develop carbon flux models for each category of project system within each ecological region, and (2) train the technical team to assess project viability, carbon fluxes, and project impacts.

Monitoring will be conducted in four stages. The first stage consists of evaluating the progress achieved by project promotion and training activities. The second stage consists of evaluating the documented working plans submitted by farmers in order to develop estimates of carbon fluxes resulting from the projects. The third stage, which follows project implementation, consists of data collection by the farmers and internal verification of this data collection through the random sampling of project participants by the technical team. The fourth stage involves similar data collection activities that continue as projects are maintained, expanded, and/or upgraded.

In addition to data relating to the measurement of carbon fluxes, indicators of project sustainability will be monitored. These indicators will be used to assess project impacts in areas such as the participation of women, comparative economic productivity, biodiversity, water quality and watershed integrity, and the long-term availability and affordability of technical training. These criteria were reviewed and developed by several international organizations, including UNCED and the Forest Stewardship Council.

B. Governmental approval

Item

Please check one of the following.

This report is a first report.

or

This report is an intermediate report.

or

This report is a final report.

Please check one of the following:

This report is a joint report. Letter(s) of approval of this report from the designated national authority of the other Party(ies) involved in the activity is(are) attached in Section J, Annex.

or

This report is a separate report.

Additional comments (if any):

C. Compatibility with, and supportiveness of, national economic development and socioeconomic and environmental priorities and strategies

Compatibility with Economic Development and Socioeconomic and Environmental Priorities


The Scolel Té project seeks to promote forestry and agroforestry projects that are designed and implemented by indigenous communities to meet their economic development needs and increase the sustainability of their land-use management practices. These projects will be implemented on both privately-owned and communal land.

According to a technical paper prepared by the project team and included in the proposal, "Based on the 1992 land reform, Mexico has sought to implement a progressive forest policy, particularly in tropical areas which contain the most important forest extensions of the country. This policy has been underlined by a number of activities: the development of a National Tropical Forestry Action Plan (SARH, 1994), - the establishment of the headquarters of the Forest Stewardship Council in Oaxaca, southern Mexico, - the elimination of subsidies and credit for extensive cattle ranching in the tropical states, - [and] the government support to various community controlled forest management projects....The 1992 change in the Mexican Land-Tenure Law (Articulo 27) gives legal title to the rural communities for the land they manage as an ejido [productive grouping of people with land given in common ownership after the 1917 revolution] or community. This allows rural farmers legal status to establish joint ventures with investors, so that capital can be invested in alternative land-use systems."

D. Environmental, social/cultural, and economic impacts of the AIJ project

Non-Greenhouse-Gas Environmental Impacts of the Project


This project is expected to contribute substantially to the preservation of biodiversity, both within and outside the project area. Within the project area, the genetic diversity of valuable tree species will be preserved through reforestation and agroforestry activities, including planned seed collection. In addition, the reforestation of degraded land and pasture will reduce forest fragmentation, offer expanded forest habitat for fauna within the project area, reduce soil erosion, and improve watershed integrity. By providing a sustainable source of timber and fuelwood, the project is expected to reduce harvesting of wood from the cloud forest in the Tzeltal area, which supports rare endemic species. The project's economic development opportunities may also slow the migration of local residents to the "agriculture-forest frontier" of the Lacandon rainforest, thereby helping to conserve its biodiversity and other resources.

The project developer identified the increased use of agrochemicals by farmers as one possible result of the higher incomes generated by the project. It is also possible that farmers may be able to purchase agrochemicals that are of higher quality and less toxic, and upgrade their spraying equipment. The project team plans to work with the agricultural advisory team of the Unión de Crédito Pajal to monitor and address this issue.

Social/Cultural Impacts of the Project


The project developer has incorporated specific measures into the project to improve the welfare of women in the participating communities. These measures are based on the needs and wishes expressed by local women during the feasibility study, and include women's participation in the production of fruit trees and ornamentals and the tending and management of tree nurseries. The project team will also pursue efforts to place a significant portion of incentive payments in the hands of women, when appropriate.

Economic Impacts of the Project


Initial funding for the projects will be provided through the sale of "proto-carbon credits." The projects are expected to become self-sustaining after approximately 18 years, and the sale of timber products should provide sufficient income for the farmers to enter into a new cycle of tree growth and harvesting after the end of the project. The project developer expects that additional local economic development will result from the stimulation of forest-based enterprises, including carpentry shops, ecotourism, and the sale of non-timber forest products.

E. Greenhouse gas impacts of the AIJ project

1. Scenario description

Item

Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

1 of 9

Site name/designation

Yaluma (Tojolobal)

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

The Yaluma village comprises 3,085 ha in the Tojolobal (highland) region. The primary land uses in this village are forest (19%), fallow (13%), pasture (8%), maize (49%), and other (11%).

Additional information is not yet available.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Item

Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

2 of 9

Site name/designation

Lomantan (Tojolobal)

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

The Lomantan village comprises 2,900 ha in the Tojolobal (highland) region. The primary land uses in this village are forest (52%), fallow (26%), maize (14%), and other (9%).

Additional information is not yet available.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Item

Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

3 of 9

Site name/designation

Palma Real (Tojolobal)

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

The Palma Real village comprises 819 ha in the Tojolobal (highland) region. The primary land uses in this village are forest (12%), pasture (49%), maize (37%), and other (2%).

Additional information is not yet available.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Item

Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

4 of 9

Site name/designation

Jusnajab (Tojolobal)

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

The Jusnajab village comprises 3,800 ha in the Tojolobal (highland) region. The primary land uses in this village are forest (68%), fallow (5%), pasture (3%), maize (16%), and other (9%).

Additional information is not yet available.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Item

Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

5 of 9

Site name/designation

Alan Cantajal (Tzeltal)

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

The Alan Cantajal village comprises 180 ha in the Tzeltal (lowland) region. The primary land uses in this village are forest (11%), fallow (13%), pasture (1%), maize (19%), coffee (38%), and other (18%).

Additional information is not yet available.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Item

Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

6 of 9

Site name/designation

Chapullil (Tzeltal)

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

The Chapullil village comprises 300 ha in the Tzeltal (lowland) region. The primary land uses in this village are forest (12%), fallow (22%), pasture (22%), maize (11%), coffee (30%), and other (3%).

Additional information is not yet available.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Item

Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

7 of 9

Site name/designation

Segunda Coloteel (Tzeltal)

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

The Segunda Coloteel village comprises 245 ha in the Tzeltal (lowland) region. The primary land uses in this village are fallow (27%), pasture (5%), maize (24%), coffee (41%), and other (3%).

Additional information is not yet available.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Item

Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

8 of 9

Site name/designation

Jolcacuala (Tzeltal)

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

The Jolcacuala village comprises 1,220 ha in the Tzeltal (lowland) region. The primary land uses in this village are forest (41%), fallow (11%), pasture (1%), maize (33%), coffee (6%), and other (8%).

Additional information is not yet available.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Item

Site Designation

Site number (order of presentation in this report)

9 of 9

Site name/designation

Muquenal (Tzeltal)

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Reference Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Has the reference scenario changed since the last report? (If yes, explain any changes below.)

Yes

No

This is the first project report.

Description:

The Muquenal village comprises 740 ha in the Tzeltal (highland) region. The primary land uses in this village are forest (14%), fallow (27%), pasture (7%), maize (14%), coffee (27%), and other (12%).

Additional information is not yet available.

Predicted Project Scenario

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

Actual Project

Primary activity(ies)

This information is not yet available.

Description:

This information is not yet available.

2. GHG emission/sequestration calculation methodology

GHG Emission/Sequestration Calculation Methodology

Site number

Live-fence projects-Site numbers to be determined

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Reference Scenario


This information is not yet available.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Project Scenario


The simulation model CO2FIX was used to calculate net carbon emissions/sequestration. Total carbon sequestration was calculated for a 150-year period, equivalent to five rotations (30 years per rotation) of Tojolobal land and six rotations (25 years per rotation) of Tzeltal land, to avoid overestimation of carbon stocks in short-rotation forest systems. Annual averages for carbon sequestration were derived from carbon sequestration totals for the first rotation. Tree growth was assumed to be linear.

In the Tojolobal region, live fence was assumed to consist of Pinus oocarpa , P. michoacana , or Cupressus sp. planted at a distance of 3 m. Production levels for poor, medium-fertile, and fertile sites were assumed to be 3.2, 4.0, and 4.8 m3/ha-yr. For these production levels, average annual carbon sequestration was calculated to be 0.96, 1.25, and 1.54 t C/ha for a period of 30 years.

In the Tzeltal region, live fence was assumed to consist of Cedrela odorata planted at a distance of 3 m. Production levels for poor, medium-fertile, and fertile sites were assumed to be 4.8, 6.0, and 7.2 m3/ha-yr. For these production levels, average annual carbon sequestration was calculated to be 1.66, 2.19, and 2.72 t C/ha for a period of 25 years.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Actual Project


This information is not yet available.

GHG Emission/Sequestration Calculation Methodology

Site number

Coffee/shade tree projects-Site numbers to be determined

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Reference Scenario


This information is not yet available.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Project Scenario


The simulation model CO2FIX was used to calculate net carbon emissions/sequestration. Total carbon sequestration was calculated for a 150-year period, equivalent to six rotations (25 years per rotation) of Tzeltal land, to avoid overestimation of carbon stocks in short-rotation forest systems. Annual averages for carbon sequestration were derived from carbon sequestration totals for the first rotation. Tree growth was assumed to be linear.

In the Tzeltal region, Cedrela odorata or Cordia alliodora were assumed to be planted as shade trees in coffee plantations at a distance of 10 x 10 m. Production levels for poor, medium-fertile, and fertile sites were assumed to be 6.0, 7.5, and 9.0 m3/ha-yr. For these production levels, average annual carbon sequestration was calculated to be 2.11, 2.76, and 3.41 t C/ha for a period of 25 years.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Actual Project


This information is not yet available.

GHG Emission/Sequestration Calculation Methodology

Site number

Taungya projects-Site numbers to be determined

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Reference Scenario


This information is not yet available.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Project Scenario


The simulation model CO2FIX was used to calculate net carbon emissions/sequestration. Total carbon sequestration was calculated for a 150-year period, equivalent to five rotations (30 years per rotation) of Tojolobal land and six rotations (25 years per rotation) of Tzeltal land, to avoid overestimation of carbon stocks in short-rotation forest systems. Annual averages for carbon sequestration were derived from carbon sequestration totals for the first rotation. Tree growth was assumed to be linear.

In the Tojolobal region, Taungya was assumed to be planted with Pinus oocarpa , P. michoacana , or Cupressus sp. at a distance of 4 x 4 m. Thinnings of 25% of total stands were expected to occur in years 8 and 16. Production levels for poor, medium-fertile, and fertile sites were assumed to be 8.0, 10.0, and 12.0 m3/ha-yr. For these production levels, average annual carbon sequestration was calculated to be 2.61, 3.31, and 4.01 t C/ha for a period of 30 years.

In the Tzeltal region, Taungya was assumed to be planted with Cedrela odorata at a distance of 10 x 3 m. Thinnings of 25% of total stands were expected to occur in years 8 and 16. Production levels for poor, medium-fertile, and fertile sites were assumed to be 11.9, 14.9, and 17.9 m3/ha-yr. For these production levels, average annual carbon sequestration was calculated to be 4.71, 6.00, and 7.23 t C/ha for a period of 25 years.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Actual Project


This information is not yet available.

GHG Emission/Sequestration Calculation Methodology

Site number

Enriched-fallow projects-Site numbers to be determined

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Reference Scenario


This information is not yet available.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Project Scenario


The simulation model CO2FIX was used to calculate net carbon emissions/sequestration. Total carbon sequestration was calculated for a 150-year period, equivalent to five rotations (30 years per rotation) of Tojolobal land and six rotations (25 years per rotation) of Tzeltal land, to avoid overestimation of carbon stocks in short-rotation forest systems. Annual averages for carbon sequestration were derived from carbon sequestration totals for the first rotation. Tree growth was assumed to be linear.

In the Tojolobal region, enriched fallow was assumed to be planted with Pinus oocarpa , P. michoacana , or Cupressus sp. at a distance of 7 x 2 m. Thinnings of 25% of total stands were expected to occur in years 8 and 16. Production levels for poor, medium-fertile, and fertile sites were assumed to be 8.0, 10.0, and 12.0 m3/ha-yr. For these production levels, average annual carbon sequestration was calculated to be 2.61, 3.31, and 4.01 t C/ha for a period of 30 years.

In the Tzeltal region, enriched fallow was assumed to be planted with Cedrela odorata, Cordia alliodora, or Calophyllum brasiliense at a distance of 10 x 2 m. Thinnings of 25% of total stands were expected to occur in years 8 and 16. Production levels for poor, medium-fertile, and fertile sites were assumed to be 11.9, 14.9, and 17.9 m3/ha-yr. For these production levels, average annual carbon sequestration was calculated to be 4.71, 6.00, and 7.23 t C/ha for a period of 25 years.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Actual Project


This information is not yet available.

GHG Emission/Sequestration Calculation Methodology

Site number

Reforestation, sustainable harvesting projects-Site numbers to be determined

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Reference Scenario


This information is not yet available.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Project Scenario


The simulation model CO2FIX was used to calculate net carbon emissions/sequestration. Total carbon sequestration was calculated for a 150-year period, equivalent to five rotations (30 years per rotation) of Tojolobal land, to avoid overestimation of carbon stocks in short-rotation forest systems. Annual averages for carbon sequestration were derived from carbon sequestration totals for the first rotation. Tree growth was assumed to be linear.

In the Tojolobal region, plantations were assumed to consist of Pinus oocarpa , P. michoacana , or Cupressus sp. planted at a distance of 2 x 3 m. Thinnings of 33% of total stands were expected to occur in years 8 and 16. Production levels for poor, medium-fertile, and fertile sites were assumed to be 8.0, 10.0, and 12.0 m3/ha-yr. For these production levels, average annual carbon sequestration was calculated to be 2.58, 3.27, and 3.97 t C/ha for a period of 30 years.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Actual Project


This information is not yet available.

GHG Emission/Sequestration Calculation Methodology

Site number

Forest preservation, silviculture-Site numbers to be determined

Project sector

Land-use change and forestry

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Reference Scenario


This information is not yet available.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Project Scenario


This information is not yet available.

Description of Calculation Methodology for the Actual Project


This information is not yet available.

3. GHG emission/sequestration data

(a) Reporting of GHG emissions/sequestration

Annual estimates are not yet available. Cumulative GHG benefits of the project are anticipated to range from a minimum of 55,000 t CO2 up to 1.21 million t CO2, depending on funding.

(b) Additional information on GHG emissions/sequestration

Indirect or Secondary GHG Impacts (Positive and Negative)


The implementation of agroforestry and forest preservation projects may result in some leakage of project benefits if agricultural activities are displaced to other areas. The assessment of opportunities for leakage will be included in monitoring activities during the first year of the project. The project team plans to offset leakage by assisting farmers with intensifying production in areas not used for agroforestry and forestry.

It is possible that local farmers who do not officially participate in the project may be influenced by the results achieved by project participants and decide to adopt forestry and agroforestry measures on their own accord. This could result in a secondary GHG benefit.

By providing a sustainable source of timber and fuelwood as well as local economic development opportunities, this project may reduce extraction of timber and fuelwood from other areas outside the project, particularly the cloud forest in the Tzeltal area and the Lacandon rainforest conservation area. This could result in an indirect GHG benefit.

Factors That Could Cause the Future Loss or Reversal of GHG Benefits


Natural disasters such as fire and pestilence could cause the loss of GHG benefits. In addition, both internal and external sociopolitical factors could cause the loss of GHG benefits. Internally, the level of farmers' participation in project activities for the duration of the project and the quality of farmers' land management activities will affect the long-term success of the project. Externally, political unrest in the vicinity of the project, such as the recent Zapatista uprising, could impact the management of communal areas.

Strategy for Reducing the Risk of Future Loss or Reversal of GHG Benefits


The project team will advocate land management practices that reduce the risk of fire and pestilence. Internal social divisions and other problems will be taken into account and managed by the project team to the extent possible. The project team reports that the communities involved in the project have remained intact and relatively peaceful despite the recent Zapatista uprising. In addition, the land tenure in these communities is secure and well established, which will help to reduce their vulnerability.

F. Funding of the AIJ project

1. Identification of funding sources

(a) Funding sources for project development

Funding Source

Country of Funding Source

Amount($US)

Percent of Total Funding(%)

UK Overseas Development Administration Forestry Research Program

213,200

56

UK Darwin Initiative

65,600

17

Commission for Environmental Cooperation

Multilateral

20,000

5

International Energy Agency's Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme

England

82,000

22

Total

380,800

100

(b) Funding sources for project implementation

Funding Source

Country of Funding Source

Amount($US)

Percent of Total Funding (%)

Is This Funding Assured? (Y/N)

Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile/Fédération Internationale Pour l'Isolement du Carbone (FIPIC)

Belgium/France

150,000

5

Y

Undetermined

3,150,000

95

N

Total

3,300,000

100

2. Assessment of additional funding needs

Current or Planned Activities to Obtain Additional Funding


The current level of funding will support sequestration of 15,000 t C out of a possible total of 330,000 t C over the lifetime of the project. American Forests and EIC will arrange for the sale of additional "proto-carbon credits" to support project activities. The current sale price of these credits is US$10/t C, which was used to calculate total funding needs of US$3,300,000.

G. Contribution to capacity building and technology transfer

Contribution to Capacity Building and Technology Transfer


Participating farmers will receive technical assistance in conducting agroforestry and silviculture activities and monitoring project results.

H. Recent developments, technical difficulties, and obstacles encountered

Recent Project Developments


This information is not yet available.

Technical Difficulties and Other Obstacles Encountered


This information is not yet available.

I. Additional information

Additional Information


None.

J. Annex

1. Host country acceptance of the AIJ project

Country/Project Title

Name, Title, and Government Agency of the Designated National Authority

Date of Approval(day/month/year)

Scolel Té: Carbon Sequestration and Sustainable Forest Management in Chiapas

Dr. Carlos Gay, Coordinator of the Unit for International Cooperation and Agreement, National Ecology Institute (INE), Secretariat of the Environment, Natural Resources, and Fisheries (SEMARNAP)

10 February 1997

2. Letters of approval of this AIJ project report

See attached concurrence form.


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