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NEW KEY DOCUMENTS FROM ADP CO-CHAIRS IN ADVANCE OF THE UNFCCC NEGOTIATING SESSION IN OCTOBER 
 

Governments are in the process of negotiating a new universal climate change agreement, which is set to be adopted in Paris in 2015 and enter into effect in 2020. Based on views and proposals from governments, the Co-Chairs of the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action (ADP), the body tasked with the negotiations, have made key material available in advance of the next negotiating session from 20 to 25 October 2014.

The material that Co-Chairs Mr. Kishan Kumarsingh and Mr. Artur Runge-Metzger have published includes a note that reflects on progress made at the previous ADP session, as well as a paper presenting views and proposals of governments on the elements for a draft negotiating text for the 2015 agreement. The material further includes a draft decision on information that governments will provide when they communicate their contributions to the 2015 agreement and a draft decision on continuing important mitigation-related work in the period up to 2020.

The material captures the collective progress that has been made thus far on the road to Paris. It aims to further facilitate the understanding of issues and options on the table. 

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